Rear brake caliper replacement, what else do I need? (1 Viewer)

StaticTorque

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I had a rear brake caliper blow out this weekend, so I need want to replace the whole caliper. The other side has some sea-page as well, so I will be doing that one as well. I was wondering what else should I get? Should I get new break lines? Anything that would make sense. Might be looking into the e brake stuff as well because my break light came on and PO said it needed adjustment. I will also be replacing the flange studs, cone washers, washers, and bolts. Any input would be greatly appreciated, need to order parts in the next couple days.
 
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Calipers can be rebuilt using OEM parts or you can go with OEM remanufactured ones.
If the soft lines on your truck are now 25 years old, I would replace them.
 
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I replaced my calipers recently instead of rebuilding, as the piston bores were a rotted mess. If you want to look at rebuilding, use an air chuck with a rubber nose, seal it to the bleed orifice and use air pressure pop the piston out of the bore, watch your fingers. This will get you a good look at the bore to see if its worth rebuilding. The rebuild parts are really affordable.
The brake light is incidental with the e-brake shoes needing adjustment, it's triggered by the handle position in the cab. If there isn't enough tension on the e-brake cable/spring holding it down, it can bounce and trigger the light to flash. The tension on the cable is adjusted at the handle in the cab, after adjusting the e-brake shoes at the drums.

As for other parts?
Soft brake lines if they show surface cracks when flexed.
Is the LSVP leaking, squeeze the rubber protection boot and see if it pees on your hand. They are like a toad in that respect.
If the rear hats are worn, they are cheap to replace.
E-brake bells, and associated parts, cables, springs etc. if they are corroded and sticky.
Dust covers if they are rotted out or otherwise mangled.
 
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Yeah, I'd lean toward replacing the soft lines, too. Except I found mine in pretty good shape (vs the front ones which I replaced last year, which are much more exposed) and decided to put it off until the next time the truck is in the shop, as my tech is better equipped to deal with a recalcitrant hard line in case breaking things loose causes issues with it.

A new caliper comes with a new bracket. You'll probably want a set of the slide bolts, too, to make everything spiffy for another quarter-century. My old ones broke off in the old bracket, so things would've been a PITA if I hadn't had these on hand.

One of my rear calipers was hanging up and the other almost that bad. Once I got things R&Red, brake performance was vastly improved. The 80 series is often said to have soft brakes, but I suspect it's lack of recent service is often the issue. Very, very happy with the improved performance after doing the rears.
 
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One of my rear calipers was hanging up and the other almost that bad. Once I got things R&Red, brake performance was vastly improved. The 80 series is often said to have soft brakes, but I suspect it's lack of recent service is often the issue. Very, very happy with the improved performance after doing the rears.
Agree completely, after the full rebuild the brakes will put you through the windshield. They are not touchy, very progressive and easy to get along with, but when pressed like you mean it, the old girl STOPS!
 
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brettk

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I replaced my calipers recently instead of rebuilding, as the piston bores were a rotted mess. If you want to look at rebuilding, use an air chuck with a rubber nose, seal it to the bleed orifice and use air pressure pop the piston out of the bore, watch your fingers. This will get you a good look at the bore to see if its worth rebuilding. The rebuild parts are really affordable.
The brake light is incidental with the e-brake shoes needing adjustment, it's triggered by the handle position in the cab. If there isn't enough tension on the e-brake cable/spring holding it down, it can bounce and trigger the light to flash. The tension on the cable is adjusted at the handle in the cab, after adjusting the e-brake shoes at the drums.

As for other parts?
Soft brake lines if they show surface cracks when flexed.
Is the LSVP leaking, squeeze the rubber protection boot and see if it pees on your hand. They are like a toad in that respect.
If the rear hats are worn, they are cheap to replace.
E-brake bells, and associated parts, cables, springs etc. if they are corroded and sticky.
Dust covers if they are rotted out or otherwise mangled.
Rear dust covers are NLA. Last I check everyone wanted $400-600 for a pair.
 

StaticTorque

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Calipers can be rebuilt using OEM parts or you can go with OEM remanufactured ones.
If the soft lines on your truck are now 25 years old, I would replace them.
I’m going to go with remanufactured ones. I have heard its a pain in the ass to rebuild them, I’m also limited on tools.

The brake light is incidental with the e-brake shoes needing adjustment, it's triggered by the handle position in the cab. If there isn't enough tension on the e-brake cable/spring holding it down, it can bounce and trigger the light to flash. The tension on the cable is adjusted at the handle in the cab, after adjusting the e-brake shoes at the drums.
This makes a lot of sense! I went on a small wheeling trip and I hadn’t aired down just to see the difference between airing down and not. It was really shaky and uncomfortable. It started coming on and off after that trip. Thank you for your input on other things to look at. I was thinking about getting new bleed plugs, and rubber plugs. Just in case I couldn’t get old ones out, and don’t want to have to wait for more parts.
Yeah, I'd lean toward replacing the soft lines, too. Except I found mine in pretty good shape (vs the front ones which I replaced last year, which are much more exposed) and decided to put it off until the next time the truck is in the shop, as my tech is better equipped to deal with a recalcitrant hard line in case breaking things loose causes issues with it.

A new caliper comes with a new bracket. You'll probably want a set of the slide bolts, too, to make everything spiffy for another quarter-century. My old ones broke off in the old bracket, so things would've been a PITA if I hadn't had these on hand.

One of my rear calipers was hanging up and the other almost that bad. Once I got things R&Red, brake performance was vastly improved. The 80 series is often said to have soft brakes, but I suspect it's lack of recent service is often the issue. Very, very happy with the improved performance after doing the rears.
Yeah the 80 hasn’t been the best “stopper” so to speak lol. I’ll keep that on my mind too, that’s why I’m doing this because I know it’ll last another quarter century,
Agree completely, after the full rebuild, the brakes will put you through the windshield. They are not touchy, very progressive and easy to get along with, but when pressed like you mean it, the old girl STOPS!
I hope this does help the braking of the 80!
 
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I’m going to go with remanufactured ones. I have heard its a pain in the ass to rebuild them, I’m also limited on tools.
SNIP
If you haven't priced OEM, it's worth checking on that price vs reman. Caliper prices seem to have moderated since I did my fronts, enough so it made sense to go with new Toyota from Partsouq when it came time to do the rears.
 
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Check your rotors too. I was going to have my turned, but they were way outta spec. Have an O'rielly's check them at least. If they had turned them it was only $15 ea. new ones were about $45-60 ea.

A short 10mm flare wrench is a MUST for the brake lines, a few are in tight spots and not a lot of swing room. Getting the clips off the brake lines is a pain, and needed a combo of a drift, hammer and channel locks depending on the locations.

I ended up with new Slee stainless lines (cheaper than OEM soft lines), new pads, calipers, rotors. new OEM caliper bolts x4. I also rebuilt a lot of the hardware inside the ebrake inside the drum because one side exploded when I took the rotor off (that was fun, pad was locked in the rotor hat). The ebrake kit has like 2 dozen parts in it...and was only like $25

I did the same on the fronts too, that said I spent 2x on all the front brake components.

Only thing I did not replace was the ebrake shoes, they still had a ton of meat on them.

BLEEDING WAS A PITA!!!! ask me about that later!
 

StaticTorque

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If you haven't priced OEM, it's worth checking on that price vs reman. Caliper prices seem to have moderated since I did my fronts, enough so it made sense to go with new Toyota from Partsouq when it came time to do the rears.
I priced them and OEM reman rear calipers were about $154 a piece.
Check your rotors too. I was going to have my turned, but they were way outta spec. Have an O'rielly's check them at least. If they had turned them it was only $15 ea. new ones were about $45-60 ea.

A short 10mm flare wrench is a MUST for the brake lines, a few are in tight spots and not a lot of swing room. Getting the clips off the brake lines is a pain, and needed a combo of a drift, hammer and channel locks depending on the locations.

I ended up with new Slee stainless lines (cheaper than OEM soft lines), new pads, calipers, rotors. new OEM caliper bolts x4. I also rebuilt a lot of the hardware inside the ebrake inside the drum because one side exploded when I took the rotor off (that was fun, pad was locked in the rotor hat). The ebrake kit has like 2 dozen parts in it...and was only like $25

I did the same on the fronts too, that said I spent 2x on all the front brake components.

Only thing I did not replace was the ebrake shoes, they still had a ton of meat on them.

BLEEDING WAS A PITA!!!! ask me about that later!
I am replacing rotors and pads as well, I have break dust all over one of my wheels so I’m just going to replace them both. I have the Slee stainless steel braided extended brake lines as well. Where did you buy the stuff for the e brake?
 
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I priced them and OEM reman rear calipers were about $154 a piece.

I am replacing rotors and pads as well, I have break dust all over one of my wheels so I’m just going to replace them both. I have the Slee stainless steel braided extended brake lines as well. Where did you buy the stuff for the e brake?
Rockauto 1997 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER 4.5L L6 Parking Brake Hardware Kit | RockAuto - https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/toyota,1997,land+cruiser,4.5l+l6,1276703,brake+&+wheel+hub,parking+brake+hardware+kit,10289
 

Irish Reiver

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New (not reman) OEM calipers are less that $150. I did mine in October. Mine is a '94 don't know if there are differences through the model years.

P/N 47730-60110 & 47750-60110​

New rotors weren't too expensive as i recall. Don't forget pads and fit kits, banjo bolts and copper washers.
 

StaticTorque

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New (not reman) OEM calipers are less that $150. I did mine in October. Mine is a '94 don't know if there are differences through the model years.

P/N 47730-60110 & 47750-60110​

New rotors weren't too expensive as i recall. Don't forget pads and fit kits, banjo bolts and copper washers.
Copper washers?
 
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Step one. (Solo method).
clean the reservoir, fill it up. Leave the cap off. Protect the paint on the fender.
your mission is to not let that resi suck dry!!!! Ever. I did and it sucks!!!!!!

I bought 5-7 quarts of fluid. But I F’d up. :). Don’t be me and suck the resi dry!!!! Nuff said.

I did the “Gatorade” bottle. Clear tube (might be 5/16”) on the bleeder port, the tube runs above the port then down into a hole in the cap of the bottle. Use a zip tie on the tube right below the hole in the bottle cap so the tube doesn’t pull out of the bottle. The bottle should have 1/4 of brake fluid in it, end of the tube has to stay below the “waterline”. Set up like this keeps air from sucking back in.

Use the 10mm wrench to crack the bleeder port on the tap (like a 1/2 turn). Go pump the brakes. I put some Teflon tape on the threads too. This method doesn’t require you to keep locking off the port between pumps. Did I mention don’t let the resi run dry!!!!!

Pump brakes 10- 20 times. Count’em. Top off resi. Check overflow bottle. Look at color of fluids. If rusty...brown or stinky. Repeat.

Order. RR, LSPV, LR, RF, LF.
 
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I priced them and OEM reman rear calipers were about $154 a piece.

SNIP
New Toyota calipers (with bracket included) were $175.59 from partsouq last July. I figured it was worth the difference to go new over reman. IIRC, Toyota remans were hard to find in the US at that time, which sort of clinched the deal.
 
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I went with all new OEM calipers from Toyota last fall. Mud is full of reports of crappy rebuilds, both Toyota and Napa/O'reilly, etc. It was about $165/corner new, as I recall. Money well spent, to me.
If you replace the soft lines it's very nice (maybe even necessary) to have the Irwin brake Vise Grips in sizes 4 and 7. Some of the fittings even on my rust free SoCal truck were so frozen that flare wrenches would just flex open and round them off.
Amazon productGood luck.
 

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