rear axle hub stud upgrade possibilities

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Feb 12, 2009
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bowling green, ky
i've searched and read about changing the studs to some other series landcruiser studs but what about ARP's? anybody ever gone this route?

i broke 4 of the 6 and sheered the two pins. pretty sure this is lack of maintenance breakage, but i know i don't want to have to easy out broken studs again. and i don't want to have this breakage on the trail and ruin a wheeling trip.

just thought i'd ask and see if anybody has done this or has any input on the idea.

chris
 
I figured I'd bump this to the top since I just sheared off all 6 studs and the 2 locating pins yesterday while having a wheel in the bush.

I did change the studs a few years ago but my 80s is now turbo'ed so there's a lot more stress going through the driveline now.

Of course, the compromise is, what ever you make strong, makes something else weaker - and that's usually harder to fix in the bush. Funnily enough, I had 12 spare new studs, cone washers and nuts, but no drill or ezy-outs (screw extractors)
 
Use 100/105 series 10mm studs and hardware, and add 2 more dowel pins to the rear hub and make the necessary adjustments to the shaft flanges and you will be good to go.
 
You can get some ARP studs, I think Front range off-road sells them, and I think Beno had two extra locating pins added to his rear hub so it has 4, and I think they are larger diameter also.

Edit, wasn't quick enough...
 
Beno: how are the 105 series hub studs different from 80 series parts and are they a direct fit, same cone washers?
 
They're larger. Requires modification.

Seems to be a popular mod in Australia, but you don't hear of it much here on this side of the pond. (And notice the location of the guy who sheared his off...)

I guess it must be due to a different wheeling style or terrain, though I don't know what specifically causes it to happen so much more often in Oz than it does here in the US.
 
I have the arp's in mine, keep them torqued and you will have no problems, I wheel mine pretty hard and even the stock ones never let me down
 
js93cruiser;7399913 keep them torqued and you will have no problems said:
I conquer.

Proper torque is essential. They are easy to over torqued by most mechanics.

LandCrusher80
 
Kernal said:
Beno: how are the 105 series hub studs different from 80 series parts and are they a direct fit, same cone washers?

80 series are 8mm studs.

100/105 are 10mm studs.

Current threaded holes need to be drilled out and rethreaded. Holes oon axle flanges need to be drilled out as well and the correct taper added for the cone washers.
 
I conquer.

Proper torque is essential. They are easy to over torqued by most mechanics.

LandCrusher80



What seems to kill them is when they get loose. When they are kept tight they rarely if ever break. Check them before every trip.

Once the pins have sheared or even loosened in the hole, the're done, and unfortunately you need a machine shop to drill out the hole on both sides bigger to fit a new pin.

The 100 series studs would be a great upgrade, as long as you can work with a machine shop to recut the cone washer tapers properly for you.
 
Thanks guys, good info I have taken on board.

When I removed the hub, I noticed the wheel bearings were rather loose. I believe this is a major contributing factor to shearing the studs and pins.
I've decided to add 2 extra 80s pins and swap the threaded studs for grade 12.9 socket head cap screws that will have the heads drilled and wired together in 3's with saftey wire to prevent them coming loose.

After blunting some quality drill bits trying to remove the locating studs, I suspect an engineering shop might be required to drill the now holes for the extra locating pins - those hubs are as hard as a cat's head!!!

Should do the trick just nicely. Will post some pics in the coming days once I put it together.
 
The el-cheapo hub studs are also junk quality. I've got some in one of my rear hubs right now and they are very hard to tighten without stripping the threads. I'm waiting on locktup4.com.au to get more stock of the ARP hub studs then I'm going to replace studs on both rear hubs.

Fitting larger studs (aka 100/105 series) seems risky as the hub castings don't really have a lot of metal to place with when drilling/tapping the 8 mm holes out to suit 10 (?) mm studs. I've never looked at whether 105 series rear hubs can be retro-fitted to 80's and the axles swaps for 105 series ones, with everything else remaining the same.

Craig.
 
The el-cheapo hub studs are also junk quality. I've got some in one of my rear hubs right now and they are very hard to tighten without stripping the threads. I'm waiting on locktup4.com.au to get more stock of the ARP hub studs then I'm going to replace studs on both rear hubs.

Fitting larger studs (aka 100/105 series) seems risky as the hub castings don't really have a lot of metal to place with when drilling/tapping the 8 mm holes out to suit 10 (?) mm studs. I've never looked at whether 105 series rear hubs can be retro-fitted to 80's and the axles swaps for 105 series ones, with everything else remaining the same.

Craig.
I like that idea!
 
Old thread but i drilled and tapped for 3/8-24 bolts. Since its cast i would probably recommend 3/8-16 instead but either way seems to work. I run L9 bolts and the whole thing works great.
 
Can't really see a need for the upgrade. Among the dozen or so rigs that often wheel together here in the desert, all with 37's, NONE have ever had a problem with loose or broken OEM studs. Maybe that's because we use torque wrenches?
 
No.

It's because you guys know what you are doing.

It's nice to think we git it right at least once in a while. But I must admit it took a couple of learning experiences (trail fails) before we got the hang of proper care and feeding(torque) for the front steering knuckle studs. Lost them all (4) on one rig on a nasty Boulder trail. Backtracked and found 2. Realized 1had snapped off inside, and to keep the remaining grease in the hub, I carved a dowel out of some ironwood along the trail. Eventhough it was driven out In the dark, it made it home OK.
 
Some people put a hi-steer setup on (if they have enough lift for it to work) to overcome many of the issues with the factory steering setup.

As for the rear hub 8 mm studs, I always use a torque wrench set to the proper amount. But the cheapy studs (like the Karson brand aftermarket ones) strip thread when tightening before getting to the proper torque.

That's why I'm hanging out to get a set of the ARP ones.

Craig,
 
Some people put a hi-steer setup on (if they have enough lift for it to work) to overcome many of the issues with the factory steering setup.

As for the rear hub 8 mm studs, I always use a torque wrench set to the proper amount. But the cheapy studs (like the Karson brand aftermarket ones) strip thread when tightening before getting to the proper torque.

That's why I'm hanging out to get a set of the ARP ones.

Craig,

So why not just use OEM studs?
 
I did break a few rear hub studs when I was servicing the rear hub, yes I used torque wrench they they snap well below 26ftlb. So I got full set of studs from cdan when he was supplying parts still and all is well for many miles to come. OEM studs are really cheap if you buy from beno or other mud vendors instead of your local stealership, it was less than 1/4 of what my stealership quoted me!
 

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