Quick time help--in the middle of 3B compression test

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Finished with first cylinder (400 psi) on my '83 3B with ~240k. Cheap Harbor Freight compression tester air relief valve didn't work so I just pulled the quick coupler at the glow plug adapter, likely a BIG mistake. I planned on returning the tester and getting a new one, either from HF or a better one so I aborted the test. Unfortunately, I can't get the #1 glow plug back in. Looked at the compression test adapter and saw this. Second pic is of different adapter (what the first should look like). The end of it broke off and I'm assuming is now essentially welded in place do to the heat.

What do I do and/or am I f#*cked?

Please help. This is my daily driver.

Thanks
image-1316098594.jpg
image-121345297.jpg
 
I'm not sure what I'm seeing in the first pic? They look the same to me?

Don't panic though - there isn't enough heat here to weld anything in place, even if the engine was running.
 
Yeah, the pics suck. Essentially there is a small rim of metal from the compression test adapter stuck down in the glow plug hole. I can catch the lip of it with a small wire but it won't come out. The rounded end of the glow plug won't go past it so I can't get the threads started.

Glad it's not welded in place but what do I do?

Guess I could drill it out but don't want to leave metal shavings behind.

Any ideas?
 
Pick at it with a dental pick?

Pack the hole with vaseline and then twist a drill bit at it by hand?

Start the engine and blow it out?
 
snowboardonsnow said:
crap, that sucks... surgery, can you see it?

Yes but it's not loose in there. That's why I was worried the heat welded it in
 
Guess I could drill it out but don't want to leave metal shavings behind.

Any ideas?

Attach a straw to a vac cleaner and suck ithe shavings out or use a telescopic magnet (check its magnetic 1st)
 
it should be the full ring down there right? do you thing you broke/crushed it trying to get the glow plug in? what in of metal is it?
I think amuarer is right if its the full ring still just turn the engine over and hope it flies out. maybe will picking at it. I like the drill bit idea to or a "out"? I don't know what they are called reverse twist and tapered... I call them outs.
 
snowboardonsnow said:
it should be the full ring down there right? do you thing you broke/crushed it trying to get the glow plug in? what in of metal is it?
I think amuarer is right if its the full ring still just turn the engine over and hope it flies out. maybe will picking at it. I like the drill bit idea to or a "out"? I don't know what they are called reverse twist and tapered... I call them outs.

Based on the appearance of the adapter tip I think it's a full ring stuck in there. I'm pretty sure I didn't break/crush it since the plug wouldn't even begin to seat in the threads. As for metal, my only response is cheap. Not sure if it's magnetic but will try everything suggested.

I'm reluctant to try again with the same compression kit if I exchange it but don't want to spend $$$ on a high end kit that I'll use a few times

Thanks for all the help
 
It should be pretty easy to find which way the ring "unrolled" from the adapter by poking around with an awl or wire... so find if the proper tool to unscrew it is a conventional drill bit or a reverse drill (I suspect the latter) and then have at it.

In truth I doubt it will do the engine any harm if a sliver of steel does fall in the cylinder, but if you're nervous I suspect it'll be safe to pack the entire precup with vaseline to act as a barrier. Just turn the engine over a few times before putting the plug back in to blow the vaseline/shavings out.
 
Can you get in there with a surgeon's pliers/forcepts. They may be skinny enough for you to get in there. Then just apply pressure against the ring and spin it out. This is the type tool I am suggesting:

kocher-surgical-forceps-straight-438196.jpg


You can often find them in places that sell tools or even in flea markets and they come in many different lengths and thicknesses.
 
not to be a smartass but...
yah get what you paid for ...
a headache.

i think the magnet would be the best bet...
 
not to be a smartass but...
yah get what you paid for ...
a headache.

i think the magnet would be the best bet...

After reading the post I went straight out and checked my compression tester adapters LOL.
All one piece,nothing to come loose
 
roscoFJ73 said:
After reading the post I went straight out and checked my compression tester adapters LOL.
All one piece,nothing to come loose

Mine was one piece too. The metal sheared off.
 
crushers said:
not to be a smartass but...
yah get what you paid for ...
a headache

Surprised no one said this sooner. I knew it was a risk with the purchase but didn't envision using it more than a couple times. Leave it to Crushers to call it like he sees it.

After buying a magnet that was too big and picks that didn't work I risked the drill bit technique and I got it out.

Thanks for the help mudders
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