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Powder Coating thirds

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by Radd Cruisers, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. Radd Cruisers

    Radd Cruisers

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    I have been working out the details to how I can powder coat axles.

    They have to be hot tank or else the oil will bleed through the powder coating when it hits the oven.

    Can I put a third in minus the seals at 400 degrees for ten minutes or will that wreck the Ring and Pinion?

    Rob
     
  2. Poser

    Poser Oh...Durka Durka Durka. s-Moderator Supporting Vendor

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    It should not hurt the RP, as many have to be heated in order to fit them over the carrier.

    Go for it!

    Post up some pics when you are done!

    Good luck!

    -Steve
     
  3. The Dude

    The Dude

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    Well one way to deal with the leaching is to bake the part before powder coating. This is often done on cast parts.

    I don't think the 400 degrees will hurt anything but with most powders you can use a lower bake temperature for a longer time. For some of the PPG powders I spray it is 300 for 30 mins, but that is dependant on the powder. I don't know if going to all that trouble on a third is worth the effort. There are a lot of liquid epoxies that will out perform most powders.
     
  4. Poser

    Poser Oh...Durka Durka Durka. s-Moderator Supporting Vendor

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    I have a buddy that swears by that POR15 stuff...uses it on many things...

    I have no personal expierence with it.
     
  5. The Dude

    The Dude

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    I would like to get my hands on some of the POR product and send it through our labs again. I believe it only hit about 200 hours salt spray on B1000 test panels.

    Trem-clad goes over 300 :-\

    generally your average powder hits 700

    speciality powders can get over 1000

    good epoxy over 1000

    As a side note I just finished some testing of Zinc powders, they went over 5000 hours, which is great!! Solves a lot of warpage issues that are associated with hot dip galvanising....
     
  6. fjcruiser

    fjcruiser

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    I am going to perfrom a little experiment with the por-15.
    I painted up my frame and rear axle housing with por-15. I painted over the rear housing with a rust resistant (like rustoleum) and painted the front housing with a primer and the same rust resistant paint.
    I want to see which lasts longer, the front or rear axle housing.
    Steve
     
  7. Radd Cruisers

    Radd Cruisers

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    [quote author=Big_Blue link=board=1;threadid=12979;start=msg119817#msg119817 date=1079066036]
    I would like to get my hands on some of the POR product and send it through our labs again. I believe it only hit about 200 hours salt spray on B1000 test panels.

    Trem-clad goes over 300 :-\

    generally your average powder hits 700

    speciality powders can get over 1000

    good epoxy over 1000

    As a side note I just finished some testing of Zinc powders, they went over 5000 hours, which is great!! Solves a lot of warpage issues that are associated with hot dip galvanising....


    [/quote]

    Good to hear first hand expierence, I was floored by the POR15 salt spray test.

    The zinc sounds like the best product for durability, only problem with any of these products is nothing will creep into the voids.

    After a year on one of our frames we started seeing rust marks on the powder coating. It was coming out from between two frame parts that overlap.

    I think I will epoxy coat our axles as we did on our first restoration. The powder looks way better than the epoxy? Could this be due the product we used Clovathane?

    Thanks
    Rob
     
  8. The Dude

    The Dude

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    When you say looks better do you mean shinier, less orange peel (smoother) better color????

    Typically epoxy has very little UV protection and needs a top coat. If it doesn't have a top coat, it tends to chalk. It also tends to have a higher viscosity and needs to be thinned accordingly to reduce orange peel.

    Powders are typically not as glossy (as liquid top coat, not epoxy) and have higher orange peel. The thing with powder is you get what you get. You can't thin it down or greatly improve the coating with application technique.

    Seems suck. There are a couple ways to combat this. If powder coating PPG makes a caulking that goes under the powder and is used to seal seems. It can be powdered over wet but should not be used as a "filler" You can also use caulking under liquid, but in my experience you are best to let it fully dry before painting. It always seems to shrink leaving a void between it and the paint.

    My reccomened solution is to stripe the problem areas with a stiff bristle brush using highly reduced epoxy or zinc or both. Let dry, and then use caulking suitable for coating to be applied. This will prevent bleed out from the problem areas.
     
  9. Radd Cruisers

    Radd Cruisers

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    [quote author=Big_Blue link=board=1;threadid=12979;start=msg121583#msg121583 date=1079387741]
    When you say looks better do you mean shinier, less orange peel (smoother) better color????

    Typically epoxy has very little UV protection and needs a top coat. If it doesn't have a top coat, it tends to chalk. It also tends to have a higher viscosity and needs to be thinned accordingly to reduce orange peel.

    Powders are typically not as glossy (as liquid top coat, not epoxy) and have higher orange peel. The thing with powder is you get what you get. You can't thin it down or greatly improve the coating with application technique.

    Seems suck. There are a couple ways to combat this. If powder coating PPG makes a caulking that goes under the powder and is used to seal seems. It can be powdered over wet but should not be used as a "filler" You can also use caulking under liquid, but in my experience you are best to let it fully dry before painting. It always seems to shrink leaving a void between it and the paint.

    My reccomened solution is to stripe the problem areas with a stiff bristle brush using highly reduced epoxy or zinc or both. Let dry, and then use caulking suitable for coating to be applied. This will prevent bleed out from the problem areas.


    [/quote]

    The powder coating was a much higher gloss and went on very smooth, the guys who shot the epoxy put it on heavey and made it run and sag.

    I would like another shot at the epoxy and shoot it myself, after viewing thier work I was not impressed.

    Can you oven bake epoxy and if so is it going to be a tougher surface?


    Rob
     
  10. The Dude

    The Dude

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    [quote author=Radd Cruisers link=board=1;threadid=12979;start=msg121639#msg121639 date=1079395528]
    The powder coating was a much higher gloss and went on very smooth, the guys who shot the epoxy put it on heavey and made it run and sag.

    I would like another shot at the epoxy and shoot it myself, after viewing thier work I was not impressed.

    Can you oven bake epoxy and if so is it going to be a tougher surface?


    Rob
    [/quote]

    Ya, that's just application error, well the runs and sags are. To be glossy you need to top coat the epoxy.

    Go ahead and bake it. Just make sure there is no open flame becuase you have thinners flashing off and those can be potential dangerous. Powder is essentially dried liquid coating pounded into a fine dust (oversimplified, but it's close), and then heated to crosslink. The alure to powder is that it is hard and dry as soon as it cools down. If you give a comparable liquid the same heat, and let it cure out properly, it will perform as good or better then powder.
     
  11. lagwagon

    lagwagon

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    Big_Blue, Do you know what kitchen appliances like stoves are coated with? I watch my kids hit the stove with cast iron pans and don't even scratch it.
     
  12. The Dude

    The Dude

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    the majority of it is PPG powder!! :D

    but, it doesn't see the sun, is designed for indoor use, only comes in white, almond and biege,(the majority) has lower gloss (usually), gets multiple stage wash in labratory condition, is on cold rold steel..........
     
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