One Aftermarket Electrical Harness to Rule Them All (1 Viewer)

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@mingles thanks - good call out. What happens when I’m working on this too late.

I was approaching solar as a plug but will include a switched/ CB as well as well as drop in a few disconnects at front and rear as you said. Especially for solar should this go before or after the converter / regulator?
 

mingles

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... Especially for solar should this go before or after the converter / regulator?

The solar disconnect should go between the panels and the charge controller (some charge controllers may have a disconnect built into them). Treat a solar array just like any other power source. The disconnect (protection) should be as close to the source as practically possible.
 
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Next Update: Now that I have a fair overview of the major pieces, I went ahead and for the time being have dropped the functional layout and reverted to a more traditional 1-line diagram for the entire circuit. I've also started sizing loads and panels and made a few decisions and observations.

1. I went with the Max current for an ARB twin high-output compressor - 69 Amps - on an isolated breaker either in the front or rear of the vehicle as options. While this complicates the design a bit, I've seen folks with either an OBA or plug-in kit ... the current rating might be overkill, but is a worthy consideration.

FWIW, a York 210 setup only costs ~25A for the clutch when it's switched on, for a similar CFM output and similar cost. If you need to save 35 amps in a layout, this is the way to go. Plus you can get a turbo that fits it from @NLXTACY :)

I was leaning towards an ARB pump, but i'm quickly moving back to the York OBA setup instead for the above reason alone.

2. I went with a 12,000 lb winch. Again, overkill, but gives you some nice safety factors throughout for sizing.

3. Not sure if shore power is worth the cost. Most converters that are of reasonable cost after some cursory googling set you back $350-500 and only provide 10A max, which is good for battery conditioning and upkeep, but is expensive and the underhood space could be utilized in other manners - that's a lot of $ for only 10 A.

4. 300W of solar is basically the entire roof of an 80 on a sunny day.

5. I moved all loads less than ~ 20A onto busses (fuse panels) for easier management. The big stuff - OBA, Inverter - have dedicated circuits and breakers for safety. Safety factors across the board are ~1.2-1.3 with some higher, and that's before we step into the distribution point or associated breakers for safety.

6. Some loads, like 12V power in the front, are duplicative with the cigarette lighter, or a 12V dashcam dedicated circuit that could be easily plugged into a USB, for instance. This probably adds 10% throughout. Should I clean these up and strip it down to something more reflective of what we'll typically see on our rig?

In short, I don't think I could've gone more conservative on the estimate ...

1962223
 
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Wow, that’s a sweet schematic you made! Seriously, that’s very close to my current power setup. Id suggest a Redarc BCDC1225d if you haven’t already purchase the IBS.:cool: Also a 27 or 31 deep cycle aux battery will give you that AH you’d want vs a 34. Look at Full River DC105-12. I work in Richmond, we should meet up some time.
 
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Thank you! Actually very glad to hear this is “close” ... the goal is to make a schematic that hits 90% of what folks want in their rigs to simplify aftermarket harness mods and give a step by step guide because most folks get worried about significant electrical mods. This is intended to demystify the process and decisions a bit.
 
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I had a rats nest to wire all the crap that I wanted in the vehicle. Im currently redoing the entire thing. I just wanted to simplify the system as much as possible.

For all lights, lighters, camp lights etc I got the Spod SE system with the touch screen. Just one wire going into the cabin for the touchscreen controller. Everything else goes directly to the Spod unit itself. No additional wires to battery and switches and relays. That cleans things up considerably.

I really do not like the way the solenoids etc work on the IBS unit. There is just too much going on. I recommend that you sell it and go with a Redarc BCDC unit. Simple and effective and offers the option to connect solar panels. I bit the bullet and took it a step further getting the Redarc manager 30. Its a complete battery management system and as simple as can be. Very few failure points, built for rough corrugated roads and incredibly simple to setup. It the future. To the manager 30 you connect the blue sea systems fusebox and connect all the other fun stuff.

CB may be outdated but on the highway its a very effective communication tool with truckers. They are a wealth of info on the road. Plus many events require you to have CB such as Cruise Moab. That being said, HAM is the future. Its superior in every way. Distance, clarity, functionality etc etc. With the right HAM setup you can even send emails. But get licensed for it. Its quick and easy.

As far as compressors go, contact @NLXTACY he will hook you up with everything you need for a nice engine driven compressor. You will be using airtools, the fastest to air up tires etc etc. Nothing but advantages. Im in a diesel so currently I am stuck with a Puma compressor and I know as much about fabrication as a cockroach knows about the space shuttle. Get on it Joey :flipoff2:

Here a connection diagram for the redarc manager 30:

full
 
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@Shoredreamer battery capacity updated in my offline version - thank you

@ZeGerman thanks for the detailed write-up and your feedback ... I should've been more clear, whether someone individually elects to use a Redarc 30 or an IBS DBM system is up to them as the end-user ... it was an oversight for me having dropped the name. I've updated it on my drawing to reflect battery disconnect between the two, options to include Blue Sea, IBS, and Redarc to name a few.

Thanks for the suggestion re: Redarc. I spent some time on their website, as well as checking out SPODs again. Both systems strike me as highly self contained, but somewhat constrained in terms of total Amperage capacity - the Redarc Manager 30 tops out at 30 Amps above demand - which is great for a wide set of LEDs and a handful of USB chargers - but when you add a fridge or some of the extra power demands, it starts pushing what the sytsem is capable of delivering. If there was a Manager100 equivalent, I'd be all over it ... but right now, the amperage capacity is a bit below what I believe the above diagram needs from a load standpoint.

In terms of the SPOD - agreed, a killer unit. It looks like a self-contained 8-channel 12v relay system with an overlaid touchscreen "shield" similar to an arduino board ...

Regardless of what it is, your input is perfect timing to the next design phase, where we start layering on controls for the whole system!

WIth that said - how do people like to control things in their rigs? Switches up front? SPOD type units? relevant switches / outlets as needed around their vehicle close to the loads? Let me know your thoughts, this next one might be a bit more of a lift
 

richardlillard1

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LOL. That's exactly why I bought a Midland CB. The first and last time I used it was at Cruise Moab inspection. For the entire event I was on 2M.

Did the person who let you know your spare tire carrier fell off use a CB or ham to notify you? If they used a ham, did they use the proper protocols?

@Tools R Us was your ham functional at the time his tire carrier fell off on the trail? Did hauling his tire carrier have any detrimental impact on your ability to transmit with your ham?

Maybe Kevin ate a ham sandwich that day for lunch, idk.
 
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Did the person who let you know your spare tire carrier fell off use a CB or ham to notify you? If they used a ham, did they use the proper protocols?

@Tools R Us was your ham functional at the time his tire carrier fell off on the trail? Did hauling his tire carrier have any detrimental impact on your ability to transmit with your ham?

Maybe Kevin ate a ham sandwich that day for lunch, idk.
I'm not sure if there's a point hidden somewhere in that random string of questions, or if you just like to hear yourself talk.

I was notified by CB radio as that was the only radio I had in my truck in 2011. It was my first trip out west to CM, and when I learned first hand that, in areas like Moab, CB radio is just about useless.

I returned to CM again in 2012 with a 2M ham in my truck and was easily able to communicate with our group, regardless of the distance between vehicles. I was also unfortunate enough to be the one to call for an Evac chopper when one of our group got injured on the trail. That wouldn't have happened without a ham radio.

My most recent trip out to CM was in 2017 in my LX450. I made a decision not to install a CB radio at all, and instead stepped up to a dual channel ham unit. Since CM management enforces the CB radio rule, I picked up a cheap hand held unit in order to pass inspection. That radio sits in it's box until needed.

If I can answer any more questions for you, don't be afraid to ask.
 
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richardlillard1

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I'm not sure if there's a point hidden somewhere in that random string of questions, or if you just like to hear yourself talk.

I was notified by CB radio as that was the only radio I had in my truck in 2011. It was my first trip out west to CM, and when I learned first hand that, in areas like Moab, CB radio is just about useless.

I returned to CM again in 2012 with a 2M ham in my truck and was easily able to communicate with our group, regardless of the distance between vehicles. I was also unfortunate enough to be the one to call for an Evac chopper when one of our group got injured on the trail. That wouldn't have happened without a ham radio.

My most recent trip out to CM was in 2017 in my LX450. I made a decision not to install a CB radio at all, and instead stepped up to a dual channel ham unit. Since CM management enforces the CB radio rule, I picked up a cheap hand held unit in order to pass inspection. That radio sits in it's box until needed.

If I can answer any more questions for you, don't be afraid to ask.

Well you seem to like to hear yourself talk about how much better your radio choice is in a thread which has nothing to do with radio choice, so I wanted to give you that opportunity.
 

richardlillard1

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@richardlillard1 the radio discussion was actually quite valuable for the purpose of sharing that two wiring set-ups should be considered, so both CB and 2m can be operated both simultaneously if needed. Prior to, I was only considering CB, so @jonheld clued me in to even considering 2m.

Fair enough, but it could also have been done without using it as an opportunity to pontificate his beliefs on radio superiority; a stupid argument, in my opinion.

Bottom line when it comes to radios is the importance of having what everyone else is using in your group, not what you believe is best. Both setups have their positives and negatives, but I use a CB because I go out with dozens of trucks who use them. I also keep a small handheld ham in the truck for the times I’m out with guys who use ham. If the majority of guys I wheeled with had ham radios, guess what would be hardwired into my truck instead of the CB?

I care less about which radio is the coolest and badassest and more about being able to talk to my group. I rarely have an issue with communication over distances and through undulating terrain with my CB and even if I did, I would be putting up with it because that’s what everyone is using in my group. For what it’s worth, I’ve also been in a straight line in a canyon with half a dozen guys on ham radios and they’ve had issues with communication. So problems can also happen with any radio.

But I’m not going to sit in the truck picking my nose like like Ralph from the Simpsons going on and on about how much better my radio setup is, talking to only myself about it.

I’m glad he was able to offer medical attention but there’s also a lot of context missing there. Down in some of the canyons in Utah, I don’t care which radio you have, you’re not getting a signal out. Period. In those locations, it’s just as important to have a grasp on how to get to cell phone service as it is to have a working radio.

I’ve also been out with guys who use race radios, FM business radios, and walkie talkies. It just depends.
 
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I think what's important to consider for this thread is not necessarily the CB-vs-HAM stuff (my take is perhaps it ought to be '&' instead of 'vs'...), but the routing layout, and running stuff thru the firewall. As far as I understand it, the accepted recommendation for HAM radios is to run positive and negative wires straight to the battery, with a fuse in each and close to the battery. Antenna cables are worth consideration as well: PL259 connectors are bulky and don't pass easily e.g. through firewall grommets; it is often better to run the cable as is, and solder/attach the connector after the tip of the cable has passed the points of restriction. Might be worthwhile to consider antenna location(s) now, and include the antenna cable(s) in the routing plan. I don't think I would include the antenna cables in a harness, wrapped together with other stuff.

CB and HAM radio are different tools. For short distance, on-trail communications, CB works fine. Personally, the folks I run with have CB in their vehicles; we're in the habit of running as a close group, and CB is ok. I also find that the spring-mounted Firestik CB antenna is more durable than the 1/4-wave 2m, or the 1/2 wave 2m antennas I currently have for my HAM radios. My current solution is CB for everyday trail communications, and there's a 50W HAM setup (in my K5, as well as in the '93' 80; haven't gotten to the LX so far... ) with mag-mount antenna (Diamond NR-770HB) for the roof if necessary.

Disclaimer: in the do-as-I-say-not-do-as-I-do-department, I actually have one 'mobile' HAM setup - 2m/70cm, 25W/20W, mag-mount antenna - powered from the cig lighter socket...
 
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Hmm. I haven’t added my system up for peak amps since I know I will never run everything all at once.

Here’s what I have added:

  • Blue Sea Systems ML-ACR 7622 12V DC 500A Automatic Charging Relay with Manual Control (dual battery control) with 2/0awg welding cables

I would recommend using tinned battery and primary cable, not welding cable. Welding cable (while very flexible) often does not have the chemical resistance and corrosion protection you would likely desire for a "rule them all" (high-end) harness set-up. Quality wire designed for boats and vehicles has those features:

 
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SmokingRocks

I bought a Cruiser to keep miles off my Cruiser
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I think 50 amp hours for the AUX battery is vastly undersized, even with solar. It will work fine if you have daily solar but two dark days without charge from the engine or solar will drag the battery down to damaging levels. Ask me how I know ;)

Also your loads are estimated on the high side which I understand why but your actual load will be a fraction of what you have noted in your one-line

I have thought about shore power but never went that route. My rig sits outside in colorado and gets daily sun which is more than enough to keep everything topped up. It tops off my rear battery (its there to take the cycles of both fridges and rear accessories like the water pump and lights), then when that battery floats a blue sea 7600 links it to the starter battery. Floats that then it links all three batteries and floats the standby battery. I think combined I have close to 200 AH. All are marine deep cycle AGM batteries, you can use a 'starting' battery if you want to but modern marine deep cycles work just fine for starting and offer better capacity.

The only reason I continue to think about shore power is when I have the rig in the garage for multiple days while doing work. If I leave one or both fridges on it will tank my third battery. I either just turn my fridges off or I hook up a trickle charger.
 
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SmokingRocks

I bought a Cruiser to keep miles off my Cruiser
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I would also suggest adding several spare runs for future expansion in your wiring loom.

300w of solar is a huge amount. I have a 100w panel and it is enough, it will soon be replaced by a 230w single panel which will occupy most of the roof. You will need a nice MPPT controller (Not PWM) to capitalize on anything more than a 100w panel.

I'm interested to see how this turns out, let me know if you have any questions
 
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I would recommend using tinned battery and primary cable, not welding cable. Welding cable (while very flexible) often does not have the chemical resistance and corrosion protection you would likely desire for a "rule them all" (high-end) harness set-up. Quality wire designed for boats and vehicles has those features:


On the list and noted - especially for the major F/R run. Thanks!
 
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Ok ... next update, where the the real fun starts in terms of positioning et al. I've added in all the switches and associated relays et al as far as I can tell; I've also included a list of switches and relays.

For overall switch philosophy, I decided to stick with mid-90s OEM look and go with the trusty fog-light switch (00550-35976) relabelled following @LandCruiserPhil 's sandpaper and sticker method for the majority. This is for two reasons - first, I like keeping it classy to the mid-90s Toyota OE look, and second, I like both the 21A switch capacity and the grounded pole for illuminating the LED inside. For the central switch cluster (6-8 switches in the middle), I am designing with the intent of toggle and winch power switches from 12voltguy, largely to minimize space consumption in the dash area. Based on what I read, I'm not sure if a SPOD could handle everything I want to throw at it (S02, S06-S07, S10-S12, S13) but please correct me.

After looking at the circuit for the rear to power the compressor, I decided that I'll build a small electrical control panel to sit inside the rear window. I plan to include a 3-position rotating selector switch to toggle between circuit branches 1, 2, and 0, as well as additional switches / plugs as needed for things like tent power, and an air coupling to plug in when airing up. This might take the form of a Blue Sea Panel 360 mounted against MDF or similar. Has anyone ever done something like that? Thoughts on this approach?

@ChaseTruck ... I've decided I will run the coax or similar radio cable to antennae on either the front or the rear. Gamiviti and YotaTEQ have nice mounts for antennae bases and they seem effective for what I want to accomplish, but I've admittedly not given it as much thought as I have the rest of the design - i'm definitely open to ideas / feedback.

As always, keep the feedback rolling!

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