old screw and bolt removal HELP ! (1 Viewer)

Joined
Aug 30, 2005
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Brevard, NC
 
 
soak in pb blaster or kroil for a day or so before atempting removal. use a box end wrench whenever possible. Buy a couple of broken screw extractors for when you torque a head off. Buy a tap 1 size larger than bolt so you can drill out and re-thread when all else fails.

You'll need beer. Lots of beer.
 
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Jun 25, 2004
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Portlandand Bend, Orygun
Kroil soak for a couple hours, heat with a propane torch (go easy!), tighten a bit with a six-point socket, then zip them out with the impact wrench! I usually "starve" the wrench with lower psi than is called for, to soften the hammer action, and to lower the torque. Stupid thing is rated at 625 ft-lbs of torque at 90 PSI, which is enough to snap most bolts, if they are stuck, but running it at 30-35 PSI works the magic. I don't know if that will work with other wrenches...

For the few that break (hah!), center punch, then drill out with progressively larger reverse-twist drills - I've never had to resort to a one of the ^%#$&^$$!!! screw extractors since I started using the reverse-twist drills - the threaded remnants will ride the drill out. Hate those screw extractors - if you break one (and you will!), they are harder than Kelsey's nuts, and you cannot drill them.

Chase the holes with a bottoming tap and tapping fluid. Clean the hole, and, if there is any rust, dose it with ortho-phosphoric acid, which turns self-catalyzing red rust into harmless black rust. Rinse, lather, repeat.

Use anti-seize or anaerobic locker when you put the bolts/screws back in - the next owner will sing your praises.

HTH

Kirk
[who has reached restoration nirvana - every bolt on my FJ40 has been out, the hole chased, and a non-rusty bolt put in and properly torqued - now I can die happy...]
 
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No. Ogden, Utah
 
 
 
 
The all time best broken bolt remover is a welded on nut to the broken surface. It heats up the area and gives you a nice place to put a wrench on. The hole in the nut provides the perfect place to put your weld.

Um... do you have a welder? If not, reverse bits are the best. Just don't break off any EZ outs, they are a pain to drill through. Good luck.
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2004
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coastal empire
Sometimes it is just better to break them off and replace with new.

Drill out those phillips heads.

Screw extractors suck. You will end up breaking them off in the fastner and then your "screwed".
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2004
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I learned this from a rodder. Heat the frozen bolt/screw, when possible, then apply parafin wax. Due to capillary action, the wax will travel along the threads. Wait till it cools then remove.
 
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Jun 16, 2003
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Hull, Mass
 
 
 
hansolo said:
I learned this from a rodder. Heat the frozen bolt/screw, when possible, then apply parafin wax. Due to capillary action, the wax will travel along the threads. Wait till it cools then remove.
I do the same thing, but spray it with PBlaster after I heat instead of soaking it beforehand. As it cools, it will allow the blaster to soak in as the bolt cools. Give it a short turn to tighten, wait a bit, then back it out. Usually pretty effective.
 

brew8

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Apr 4, 2004
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Use a hand impact driver especially for the phillips screws, then just hammer them out, BTW get a good phillips screw bit that fits the screw.
 
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Jan 19, 2003
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Get a set of left hand drill bits. As you drill through the
center of the screws the bits catch and loosen the screws.

Sometimes.
 
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Mar 14, 2003
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Between Here and There
 
 
 
brew8 said:
Use a hand impact driver especially for the phillips screws, then just hammer them out, BTW get a good phillips screw bit that fits the screw.

That's been my path working on my 64..

I soak the bolt/phillps head and where ever I can reach the threads with PB or other penetrating oil. I usually hit them for a few days prior.

Then the proper size phillips/socket. The Phillips will usually get going with the pound or two from and impact screwdriver. IF that doesn't work vise grips will get them off but the head is usually toast.
 
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Portlandand Bend, Orygun
B6i6K6e6R6b6O6y said:
i use my easy outs all the time never any. maybe becasue there craftsman.
Exactly the opposite of my experience, both with current Craftsman tools, and with ez-outs in general.

Craftsman tools have been going downhill since they started waffling on their lifetime warranty in the late 1970's. Last time I went to exchange a 3/8 ratchet wrench that had broken, they wanted to "see my receipt" - for a tool I bought thirty years before!

Had a serious discussion with the sales manager. They finally replaced it with current stock (which is what the warranty promised), but I find the quality of the new wrench to be poor. They used to sell rebuild kits for their ratchet wrenches, and would rebuild them while you waited. Those days are gone.

In the meantime, my grandfather's Craftsmen automotive tools that he bought in the early 1950's, when he was a Sears manager, toil on with a cousin - no plating (never had it), but that set has never had a part break. Probably a collector's item, by now.

Kirk
 

gladly

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Apr 16, 2005
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hammer and cold chisel, whackthe chisel into the bolt head a few times to make a "tooth" then angle it so that as you hit it turns out, works often, after soaking, heating, rounding, swearing, but before drilling or grindering.
e-z outs work sometimes, but aren't worth the chance you take on having to remove a broken e-z out.
 

Coolerman

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Jan 5, 2004
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Paint Lick, KY
 
 
 
Home made air powered shock tool, heat and lube :) I made the tool shown last year from a description of one on the LCML. Works unbelievably well on phillips screws and small nuts. It's an air chisel equipped SST. A 3/8" 3" extension welded to a 401 shank and an old screw driver handle welded at a right angle. To use, first, when possible, heat the screw head. You can use a large soldering iron to apply heat it you don't want to set the truck on fire. Then turn the air down to 30-45 psi, put a phillips bit in the bit holder, press the bit hard into the screw, pull the trigger and rotate the screwdriver handle. The screws usually come right out. ALWAYS use a bit that fits the screw.
P3200003M.jpg
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
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VANCOUVER BC
 
Ummm rusted bolts... you guys talk about heating up the bolt and putting PB on it, Am fresh into replacing bolts on my 42, what is PB...does WD40 count as a penetrating oil? And How should I go about heating the bolts with out buying another tool........hairdryer?...joking.....Hot iron?....not joking.
regards.
J
 

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