Oil Pressure Gauge

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Hi All!

I want to install an extra oil pressure gauge on my rig and I'm thincking of installing it inline with the OEM sensor.

My questions are, the OEM sender is 1/8, am I right?
Regarding the install what's the best solution/ adapter/ fitting or what does fit? Follows some examples

1668054948372.png


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1668055054872.png


1668055207028.png



Thanks!
 

mudgudgeon

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I used a steel T on my 1HZ to set up an oil feed for a turbo..

I used the T so it turned the oil pressure sensor 90⁰ or parallel to the block to keep it ticked and not sticking out a long way.

I used steel as I want confident brass would hold up to the weight hanging off it with vibrations over the long term

IMG_20170527_150759.jpg
 

jellis

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I thought that fitting in the block was BSP, not NPT?!?

I agree on the steel, but be careful because it'll strip out those BSP threads easier than brass!! =P

I setup a brass T arrangement but never actually installed it with the OEM sending unit exactly because I was worried about it breaking. Just running my multigauge sensor for now.
 

mudgudgeon

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I thought that fitting in the block was BSP, not NPT?!?

I agree on the steel, but be careful because it'll strip out those BSP threads easier than brass!! =P

I setup a brass T arrangement but never actually installed it with the OEM sending unit exactly because I was worried about it breaking. Just running my multigauge sensor for now.
I believe for automotive stuff, BSP is typically used for water and gas fittings.
NPT for pressurised oil fittings.

No doubt there's exceptions. So I'm happy to be wrong.

The two are almost interchangeable in that size. (Don't do this)

Regarding stripping threads, I used teflon tape, and go easy on the strong arm torque wrench. Screw it in enough to get decent thread engagement, and compression on the teflon tape so you get a seal and that's it. Theoretically, no tape required to seal a tapered fitting, but using tape means you don't need to over tighten.
 
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I believe for automotive stuff, BSP is typically used for water and gas fittings.
NPT for pressurised oil fittings.

No doubt there's exceptions. So I'm happy to be wrong.

The two are almost interchangeable in that size. (Don't do this)

Regarding stripping threads, I used teflon tape, and go easy on the strong arm torque wrench. Screw it in enough to get decent thread engagement, and compression on the teflon tape so you get a seal and that's it. Theoretically, no tape required to seal a tapered fitting, but using tape means you don't need to over tighten.
agreed, but I have been favouring liquid teflon thread sealant goop in preference to tape now. Don't want tape blocking up oil or fuel lines.
 

ToyotaMatt

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Hi All!

I want to install an extra oil pressure gauge on my rig and I'm thincking of installing it inline with the OEM sensor.

My questions are, the OEM sender is 1/8, am I right?
Regarding the install what's the best solution/ adapter/ fitting or what does fit? Follows some examples

View attachment 3163967

View attachment 3163968

View attachment 3163969

View attachment 3163978


Thanks!


how about a correct JDM / J.I.S. pipe taper Y Fitting like i think you need ?


- stainless steel

- also includes a OEM TOYOTA JID JDM service cap / PLUG too .......

- you can use my JIS fitting as a manual cap on cap off service and TESTING Gauge port too ..... :cool:

- you will simply apply TOYOTA Black FIPG to the male threads CAREFULLY

or

Traditional Aviation sealant


- Teflon tape sucks in my opinion and also insulates the needed ground side circuit of the OEM BELL shape sensor sender too
 

mudgudgeon

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how about a correct JDM / J.I.S. pipe taper Y Fitting like i think you need ?


- stainless steel

- also includes a OEM TOYOTA JID JDM service cap / PLUG too .......

- you can use my JIS fitting as a manual cap on cap off service and TESTING Gauge port too ..... :cool:

- you will simply apply TOYOTA Black FIPG to the male threads CAREFULLY

or

Traditional Aviation sealant


- Teflon tape sucks in my opinion and also insulates the needed ground side circuit of the OEM BELL shape sensor sender too
Well, you know what they say about opinions? :hmm: :lol:

I know of several plumbing companies that don't allow the use of liquid thread sealing pastes as they are unreliable if not carefully applied.

I personally prefer teflon tape as it's semi solid and you can control where it's located in the threaded section more reliably. It stays were you put it. Pastes can be pushed out of the joint as it's screwed together

As a plumber, use of silicone sealants on threads was frowned upon. Silicone is slippery, and stays lubricious in a joint.

If you use a small amount of teflon, you'll still get metal on metal thread contact.


Interesting you raise JIS tapered thread.

Below is from Ryco website.

Screenshot_20221115-130315.png
 
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good points, just paranoid. presently have tape on the oil connections but used hylomar on the secondary fuel filter line, seems ok..
 

ToyotaMatt

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Well, you know what they say about opinions? :hmm: :lol:

I know of several plumbing companies that don't allow the use of liquid thread sealing pastes as they are unreliable if not carefully applied.

I personally prefer teflon tape as it's semi solid and you can control where it's located in the threaded section more reliably. It stays were you put it. Pastes can be pushed out of the joint as it's screwed together

As a plumber, use of silicone sealants on threads was frowned upon. Silicone is slippery, and stays lubricious in a joint.

If you use a small amount of teflon, you'll still get metal on metal thread contact.


Interesting you raise JIS tapered thread.

Below is from Ryco website.

View attachment 3168246


what can i say , im a purist mr. mudgudgeon :cool:
 
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I used a steel T on my 1HZ to set up an oil feed for a turbo..

I used the T so it turned the oil pressure sensor 90⁰ or parallel to the block to keep it ticked and not sticking out a long way.

I used steel as I want confident brass would hold up to the weight hanging off it with vibrations over the long term

View attachment 3164016
It is better not to use fittings of this type. There were cases when the fitting broke from shaking and vibration on the thread.
 
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Better way to install aux gauge

270A0E68-BDC1-4403-9CDC-0A1CB0E0D661.jpeg

High pressure hose metric thread m10*1. One side to stock gauge port, on another side т or + fitting for stock and aux sensors
 

mudgudgeon

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Better way to install aux gauge

View attachment 3168327
High pressure hose metric thread m10*1. One side to stock gauge port, on another side т or + fitting for stock and aux sensors

So you'd introduce a rubber hose to your pressurized oil system, but a steel T is too risky?

I'll stick with a steel T. 👍
 
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So you'd introduce a rubber hose to your pressurized oil system, but a steel T is too risky?

I'll stick with a steel T. 👍
Steel T broke through the thread at the engine block from driving on bad roads. Maybe there was a low-quality fitting, but it was.
AC1B8B1B-F04E-4C69-8E96-1EC4D337F596.jpeg


This high pressure hose that works up to 2000psi. There can't be such pressure in the car. I installed more than twenty such kits and there have never been any problems
 

jellis

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Considering that it occurred to me naturally that adding a T with that big sender on the end might be a bad idea from a reliability standpoint, I don't think that Obrokoff's approach of adding in the pressurized flex line is necessarily a liability.

It's definitely NOT an M10x1 thread in the block though, it's a tapered thread:

....but apparently JIS and not BSPT! Which make sense....
 
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It's definitely NOT an M10x1 thread in the block though, it's a tapered thread:

On all Toyota cars, a pressure sensor with tapered threads м10*1
 

jellis

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Looking into this more it appears as though ISO metric tapered threads are based upon BSP and therefore identical in form to both BSP and JIS so I think we're actually ALL correct!
 

mudgudgeon

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it occurred to me naturally that adding a T with that big sender on the end might be a bad idea from a reliability standpoint,

Anything man made can fail.
Often the failure is through operator error.

The sender canister weighs a couple of hundred grams, hanging off a 3/8 / 10mm steel pipe fitting.
I suspect whether a T is brass or steel, failure here is more likely due to an error in installation process.
I chose steel because it's gonna have a lot higher tensile strength than brass, and I figure it will stand up to vibration much better.

As always there's many ways to skin a cat.
 

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