Oil pan and gasket question

Joined
Mar 20, 2020
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BALLSTON LAkE, NY
Good morning all, I have a question I hope someone can chime in on before I install my new oil pan.
I bought a new oil pan 12101-61013 and gaskets 12151-61010 and later 12151-61011 as they both are listed as compatible. Here are some pics of the new and old gaskets, neither seem to fit right. I know you need to add some FIPG to the corners. I am curious if the small gaps are expected and will disappear once torqued down? The first couple of pictures are with the 61011 gasket and the last is with the 61010 gasket. I have the orientation marks on the front half too. I flipped the gaskets both ways and the gaps are still there.
Let me know what you think and let me know if I am missing something.
Thanks

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Joined
May 6, 2020
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Seattle
It looks ok in some of your pics and sort of bent in others, so, is the pan lip flat?

If you flip the pan over on a flat surface, does it lay flat or is it curled up or bent? I wouldn't expect this on a new one, but from prying off a used one, depending on how well it's adhered, the lips tends to bend up and requires some work to get it back flat. Maybe you got a wonky one.
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2005
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Southern Colorado
Those gaps look normal to me. With FIP and proper installation, you should be fine.

Suggestion: I used thin/cheap zip ties (those worthless 6" long ones that are 1/8" wide) in every other pan hole to keep the gasket in place during install. After the pan is lightly snugged up to the block, you cut the zip ties and remove them. You may also want to cut the heads off long bolts (same size as your oil pan bolts) and and use those as guide studs during the pan install. Watch that the 'hoop' part of the gasket (at each end) doesn't fall into or out of the pan as you install it. It's a bit of a 3 ring monkey circus as you do the installation, so be patient.
 

77mustard40

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^^^ Definitely a big help when installing the pan. Get the FIPG evenly distributed on both sides of the gasket, then you can raise the pan into place and hold it there with about six of these as you install the final hardware. These clips are screwed into place and removed with a flat screwdriver. When I did mine I snugged the bolts but no more, let the FIPG cure and then torqued to spec. No runs or drips here and its been a few years. Don't over-torque, that will deform the cork increasing the chance of leaks.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
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Iowa
Yeah, it works.
Just installed it on one of 1972 fj40. Works great no leaks, and I'd recommend getting someone to help or get a jack/wood to hold it in place
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2004
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NY and AZ
i ordered two because i thought mine were messed up somehow because of the gaps. Ended up installing and somehow the gaps closed up. i think mine looked similar to yours.
 

1911

chupacabra
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Parker County, Texas
^^^ Definitely a big help when installing the pan. Get the FIPG evenly distributed on both sides of the gasket, then you can raise the pan into place and hold it there with about six of these as you install the final hardware. These clips are screwed into place and removed with a flat screwdriver. When I did mine I snugged the bolts but no more, let the FIPG cure and then torqued to spec. No runs or drips here and its been a few years. Don't over-torque, that will deform the cork increasing the chance of leaks.

What @77mustard40 said. The torque spec is in inch-pounds, so get a an inch-pounds baby torque wrench and don't over tighten, or you will squeeze the cork gasket out and it will leak.
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2020
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BALLSTON LAkE, NY
Many thanks for everyone chiming in and all of the suggestions. I had planned on using the Poser technique of strings to hold the gasket in place, of course the small zip ties would work too. I also planned on using the jack and some blocks to get it up in place cause I dont want to share beer until its over. And of course its colder than hell in NY and no one would come over to help on a cold day. I did plan on setting it in place, waiting a day or two before torquing and then another day or two later adding oil. Its not like I can drive it now anyways, the salt on the road is quite thick. I assumed the 61011 gasket would smoosh in to place with the new pan and I appreciate the feedback. The old pan has a big dent and the rear seal drips daily from the lip of the pan. I dont see any seepage up higher so I hope the rear main is good, I will swap it out later when changing the transmission.

thanks again!
 

Steamer

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Except for two on opposite corners, I hung all the pan bolts in the pan with the gasket in place, by using clips made of bent leader wire. When ready, I hung the pan with two really extra-long bolts in those empty corners. Then I simply raised the pan, pulled one clip, and started in a bolt a few threads. Once I had two in, my hands were free to pull clips and screw in all the bolts one by one. You just need to put the clips near the end of the bolts so the bolts hang down out of the way till ready to go in. With all but two bolts pre-installed in their holes, the gasket was held in place quite well. Easy one man install.
I only used sealant in the corners. The rest was Never-Seez on both sides of gasket.

PanBolt.jpg
 

Steamer

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never heard of Never seize on the gasket before
Not promoting it, but It’s just my thing. I hate cleaning glued on gaskets when I take something apart. I agree, sealants are added insurance against leaks, but I don’t have any issues. Anything I take apart goes back together with Never-Seize. I use it on the side cover, differentials and covers, timing plate and cover, t-stat housing, water pump, tranny top plate, However, a few years back, on a tip from a Mud member, I switched from Never-Seize to Sil-Glyde, a silicone grease. I Still use Never-Seize on the manifolds. I do use sealant on the backing plate when I install a new water pump, but it’s Never-Seize between the pump and block. And sealant on the oil pan gasket corners. I use Permatex to bond the valve cover gasket to the cover and Never-Seize between the gasket and head. It makes for easy valve adjusting re-using the gasket over and over. I only replace the gasket if I decide to repaint the cover.

I’m sure it was risky on the timing plate and cover. It would have been a pain to re-do it for a leak, but I got away with it. I meant to, but I forgot to put sealant on those timing plate bolts that go all the way through, but I have no leaks there.

Not trying to convince anyone. It’s just my thing and I’m happy with the results.
 

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