Nippondenso A/C Compressor and Clutch Assembly

cbmontgo

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I just picked up an OEM compressor and clutch assembly for the 60 yesterday and need to get the two assembled tonight. The clutch comes in several pieces and also has several "shims" that Toyota gave me.

Are there any tricks to putting this together? I am not able to pull my old clutch off the compressor to see how it goes together, even with the center nut removed. I need to get this put together so that I can get it installed and charged with refrigerant.

I also need to install the service valves on top of the compressor body, but that looks pretty simple.

Assembly advice appreciated for this clutch.
 
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haven't replaced an AC clutch in a while but i believe you're going to need some special tools like this:

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/CPS-CTK1300A.html

the shims are so you can set the airgap between the pulley and the clutch. i have the FSMs at home so i can check the spec. after work unless somebody chimes in before that.

make sure you know whether the compressor came filled with oil; some are shipped dry; you don't want to over or underfill the AC system.
 

cbmontgo

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haven't replaced an AC clutch in a while but i believe you're going to need some special tools like this:

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/CPS-CTK1300A.html

the shims are so you can set the airgap between the pulley and the clutch. i have the FSMs at home so i can check the spec. after work unless somebody chimes in before that.

make sure you know whether the compressor came filled with oil; some are shipped dry; you don't want to over or underfill the AC system.

Damn. I don't have those tools. This is getting to be expensive.

I am not sure (neither was Toyota of Dallas) if they are shipped with oil or not. I am guessing that they aren't. How do you know how much it needs? Does it just pour into the ports at the top?
 

John McVicker

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haven't replaced an AC clutch in a while but i believe you're going to need some special tools like this:

http://www.thetoolwarehouse.net/shop/CPS-CTK1300A.html

the shims are so you can set the airgap between the pulley and the clutch. i have the FSMs at home so i can check the spec. after work unless somebody chimes in before that.

make sure you know whether the compressor came filled with oil; some are shipped dry; you don't want to over or underfill the AC system.

Shim.... Be certain to use the shim.

I was doing the same thing you are getting ready to do...mate the clutch w/the compressor, on my 60...did not use the shim & fried the compressor in about 2 mins. what was I thinking ?? Clutch was still good but the compressor was
toast.

John
 
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cbmontgo,

couple of questions...

why are you replacing the compressor? if it's because the old one grenaded, be sure to flush out all of your AC lines. any pieces of a grenaded compressor floating around in your AC system can potentially eat up your new compressor. (not to mention clog up your lines, expansion valve, etc.)

i'm assuming you're retrofitting to R134A? if so, be sure to use the correct oil. the R12 systems used a mineral based oil. you'll want PAG oil if you're using 134A.

if the compressor doesn't say if it's filled with oil, then you'll have to tip it over and see what comes out; be sure to measure how much comes out and pour the same amount back into the compressor, (on the low side.) if it's dry, you'll have to guestimate how much to put in. TOTAL system oil capacity should be 5.2 to 6.2 oz. (around 100cc) TOTAL 134A capacity should be 800g., or 90% of the R12 capacity.

generally speaking, if you're changing the compressor, it's a good idea to also change the receiver drier at the same time.

not to doubt your ability, but AC work is something you may want to farm out. to do AC work properly you'll need a bunch of special equipment. if you pay someone to do it, then they'll have to warranty their work which is good for you should something go awry. (be careful though; some shops will not warranty any job if the customer brings his/her own part.)

if you have more questions, post 'em and i'll try to help. (i'm a mechanic by trade and have retrofitted more cars than i can count.) i have to admit though that my own AC in my 60 is out of commission due to a bad expansion valve, which i have been too lazy to fix.
 
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Damn. I don't have those tools. This is getting to be expensive.

I am not sure (neither was Toyota of Dallas) if they are shipped with oil or not. I am guessing that they aren't. How do you know how much it needs? Does it just pour into the ports at the top?


I bought a new one in oz last year and it came with oil and a small amount of refrigerant to keep the seals moist.
Had a plate across the hole to keep it all in.;)
 

cbmontgo

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cbmontgo,

couple of questions...

why are you replacing the compressor? if it's because the old one grenaded, be sure to flush out all of your AC lines. any pieces of a grenaded compressor floating around in your AC system can potentially eat up your new compressor. (not to mention clog up your lines, expansion valve, etc.)

i'm assuming you're retrofitting to R134A? if so, be sure to use the correct oil. the R12 systems used a mineral based oil. you'll want PAG oil if you're using 134A.

if the compressor doesn't say if it's filled with oil, then you'll have to tip it over and see what comes out; be sure to measure how much comes out and pour the same amount back into the compressor, (on the low side.) if it's dry, you'll have to guestimate how much to put in. TOTAL system oil capacity should be 5.2 to 6.2 oz. (around 100cc) TOTAL 134A capacity should be 800g., or 90% of the R12 capacity.

generally speaking, if you're changing the compressor, it's a good idea to also change the receiver drier at the same time.

not to doubt your ability, but AC work is something you may want to farm out. to do AC work properly you'll need a bunch of special equipment. if you pay someone to do it, then they'll have to warranty their work which is good for you should something go awry. (be careful though; some shops will not warranty any job if the customer brings his/her own part.)

if you have more questions, post 'em and i'll try to help. (i'm a mechanic by trade and have retrofitted more cars than i can count.) i have to admit though that my own AC in my 60 is out of commission due to a bad expansion valve, which i have been too lazy to fix.

I agree; I need to have someone else evacuate and charge the system. I wanted to save some $$ by buying the compressor and clutch myself. I swapped in a used compressor a couple of summers ago, but it only lasted me a year before it started squealing.

I did replace the dryer and o-rings, so at least that is done. I had hoped to have the compressor/clutch already installed when I take it to get evacuated and recharged, as this would save some cash (and I can swap a compressor in about 10 minutes). I think I need to go ahead and accept the fact that I am going to take it in and have this done.

Thank you for the input.
 
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I bought a new one in oz last year and it came with oil and a small amount of refrigerant to keep the seals moist.
Had a plate across the hole to keep it all in.;)

Hey Rosco

noticed that you mentioned you bought a new AC last year out here in WA. I need one for my FJ62 too - was quoted $960 by a place in Welshpool for a new compressor, seals and re-gas (it is still R12 - i think that is the term he used).

Have no idea if that is good, or bad... Where did you go for yours..?

Thanks in advance ~PHIL
 

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