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New CV Axles or reboot...

Discussion in 'FJ Cruiser' started by Axe55, Nov 12, 2017 at 9:14 PM.

  1. Axe55

    Axe55

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    I am sure that this is old news but I need some info...

    2008 FJC TT 6 Speed, just rolling over 90k miles. Moderate off roading when I live in a place that has trails, right now South Carolina and wheelin at Uwharrie, which is awesome! I have not paid enough attention to the CV's and now I feel they are my weakest link.

    I know that the axles have been leaking grease out of the boots for some time and I haven't done anything. I am very much the attitude of replacing something instead of breaking it on the trails....

    My question is should I replace both the axles and carrry an old spare or reboot the current CVs and buy a spare to carry in the truck??


    Truck: All Pro front bumper, full skids, sliders, upper/lower rear LCA, light racing front UCA, Warn 9.5 xp-s, 3 in lift, 33'' Duratracs etc.

    Thanks for the advice

    20171112_114116.jpg
     
  2. 1911

    1911 chupacabra SILVER Star

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    It's not that difficult as a trail repair (if you have the right tools and are mechanically inclined) , so if it were mine I would just carry a spare. In fact, mine are still original with 190,000 miles on them, and I do carry a spare that I have never used.
     
  3. bigredmachine

    bigredmachine

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    reboot and keep a spare, its easy enough to reboot and it dosnt look like youve lost too much grease so the joints should be fine. if you get the boot kit from the dealership ot will come with everything that you need, new boots, clamps and grease
     
  4. Axe55

    Axe55

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    Thanks for the advice fellas, game plan to get the reboot kits and make that a winter project for the front end. Also keep track of the tools I use and make a kit for the trails with a spare axle.
     
  5. BMThiker

    BMThiker I aim to misbehave Moderator SILVER Star

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    Pick up a 35mm impact socket and breaker bar from Harbor Freight. It'll get the job done. All other tools are basic sockets/wrenches: 12mm, 14mm, 17mm, 19mm.

    Realistically, you can do it with just the 35mm socket and the 19mm socket. You'll need small pry bars or large flat screw drivers to pop the inner stub shaft out of the diff.
     
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  6. Axe55

    Axe55

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    Awesome! Thanks @BMThiker That is great info, I'll get it down pat when I do the boots in the garage so I am familiar for a trail repair.

    Any pins or c clips that would need replaced?
     
  7. bigredmachine

    bigredmachine

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    youll get new c-clips with the boot kit but you dont need to replace them if you dont want to. personally i never have in the last 10 years on more axles than i can count and havent had any issues.

    your also going to need a 10mm hex socket so you can refill the diff when the axle is out, your probably going to lose a little gear oil
     
  8. BMThiker

    BMThiker I aim to misbehave Moderator SILVER Star

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    Park truck off camber to your advantage on trail and diff juice stays in ;)

    The key to the two-socket-only method** is swinging the entire spindle arm off the end of the CV assembly while it remains attached to the upper control arm.

    1. Remove 19mm castle nut from outer steering tie rod.
    2. Remove the two 19mm bolts from the lower ball joint bracket.
    3. You can leave the brake caliper and wire sensor still attached.
    4. Then holding the spindle out of the way while you wrangle the axle out of the diff is the next challenge. This goes faster with either a ratchet strap to hold it or even better a buddy to hold it and move it as necessary.

    **If you still have a front swaybar, then that will need to be disconnected (I ditched mine long ago, forgot which size socket that is, 14mm?).

    Pictures are of trail extraction of CV assembly. This was that one time I used a $100 Napa axle - never again! Me and my buddy had this one pulled and replaced within 20 minutes.
    2011-10_Cove (136).JPG 2011-10_Cove (138).JPG
     
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  9. mattv94

    mattv94

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    Things I've learned doing CV axle swaps:

    Puppy pads make a decent way to avoid gear oil from getting everywhere.

    Sacrificial flathead screwdrivers and/or chisels are nice for getting the dust cover off. If you're careful the cover will be reusable.

    The axle may be stuck in the wheel hub assembly. If you're lucky a wack or two with a mallet will break it loose so you can swing the spindle out of the way. I taped the threads before giving it some aggression.

    In my case I wasn't so lucky -- I used my 2 jaw puller to push the axle inwards a bit to break it loose.

    If you're careful you won't damage the seal on the inside of the spindle. But I replaced it anyways. I used National p/n 710573.



    For rebooting I found this guy's video was helpful.

     
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  10. Axe55

    Axe55

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    Awesome info guys, thanks @mattv94 and @BMThiker, I'm going to go home and digest all of the info and build my trail tool kit.

    Glad after this I will feel confident doing a trail repair. I have a Toyota axle as the spare, hopefully avoid @BMThiker s issue. I've got a couple more trails in mind once I have this ready.
     
  11. bigredmachine

    bigredmachine

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    front sway bar nuts are a 14 or 17 mm.

    when you put your axle back in put a little grease on the splines going into the hub so its easier to take it out later
     
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  12. Axe55

    Axe55

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    Good tip, got the boot kits ordered. I learned about fat.parts at my last Wheeling event. Great Toyota part prices, used them for the FJ and my wife's Camry
     
  13. Axe55

    Axe55

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    How does the FJ behave without the sway bar? On road/off road...
     
  14. mattv94

    mattv94

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    I've had my front swaybar off since I installed OME Light and SPC uppers up front.

    Truck behaves fine for me.

    I'd assume having too soft of a spring rate would make being sans swaybar a bit sketchier.
     
  15. Axe55

    Axe55

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    Humm I've got light racing uca and toytec springs, allpro bumper and warn 9.5 so added weight, may consider it more when less of a daily driver.
     
  16. BMThiker

    BMThiker I aim to misbehave Moderator SILVER Star

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    Yeah, once you ditch the OEM coilovers, most aftermarket kits will handle better overall. I find it smooths it out a bit without the swaybar in front, especially when going over off camber stuff like railroad tracks or speed bumps that don't square up with the wheels. When the swaybar is still connected it moves the body around with the suspension on low speed stuff. Without it, it seems to let the suspension soak up the terrain and the body stays flatter. I still have the rear sway connected.