My Ignition Broke!

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Olathe, KS, USA
I went to restart my 96 Land Cruiser (1FZ-FE) and the switch turned on, but it wouldn't start. The key flopped all the way to the right , but wouldn't return and there was no "spring" back from the start position.
I noticed that my radio had power, my ABS light was on (because it's always on), and my blower fan was running, regardless of where I put the key or removed it from the ignition.

What this is:
The Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod broke internally.
I am going to show what happened and how to fix it. This is common on the 100 Series, but NOT on the 80 Series. I found that there appears to only be one other with a similar failure that has posted on 'Mud. I will link other threads for references.
(Assume for the FAQ section)

What this is NOT:
This is NOT a lock cylinder failure where you cannot get your key out or where the key comes out no matter what position its in.
This is NOT about the ignition SWITCH failure where it wouldn't start.

Key words:
Ignition Switch
Ignition Rod
Ignition Key
Key Lock
Lock Cylinder
Key Cylinder

My truck:
1996 Toyota Land Cruiser 1FZ-FE
331,011 Miles (135,000 miles done by me)

This happened with ZERO warning. I was going to move the truck to another place and when I jumped in, turned the key like I always do, and everything turned on like I expected, then when I rotated to the "START" position, nothing happened and the key stayed in that position. I then turned the key to the "OFF" position and I was able to remove the key. That's when I noticed that everything was still on, but the truck didn't start. The steering wheel didn't bind, the key didn't turn hard, and I had no prior indications that something was ready to give up.
(I was lucky it happened at my work warehouse so I had a place to put it)

My first thought was that the ignition switch failed and that's why it didn't spring back. Usually that will engage the starter and it STAYS engaged, but that was NOT the case here.

So, I realized that my first step was to disconnect the battery so it didn't kill the battery, so I rolled up the windows (fortunately the switch was on enough to operate the windows)

I disconnected the battery so I could start the diagnosis.

My key stayed in this position. I could move it back and remove it, but the dash lights stayed on and the blower kept running.

IMG_20220712_203358508 (Medium).jpg


Tools Needed:

Flashlight or Headlight
1/4" drive ratchet
10mm socket, hex, 1/4" drive
9/16" combination wrench (for the battery post)
Narrow 1/8" flat screwdriver, about 6" long
1/4" flat screwdriver, about 9" long
#2 Phillips (or JIS bit) screwdriver about 10" long
#2 Phillips (or JIS bit) screwdriver about 6" long
#2 Phillips (or JIS bit) screwdriver about 2" long
Dental pick
Mirror (to see the screw on the back of the ignition switch)
6" needle nose pliers
Tube of dielectric grease
FSM (Note that all the information and diagrams are in the "SR-009 Components Tilt Steering Column" section of the FSM)

Parts Needed:
Used Column that has a good Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod


IMG_20220712_220300264 (Medium).jpg


1) Disconnect the NEGATIVE post on the battery and isolate the cables so they cannot touch the post during movement or shaking of the vehicle.
2) Using the Phillips screwdriver, remove the Instrument Lower Finish Panel. Pay attention to screw sizes, types, and location, as well as count.
3) Using the 10mmsocket and ratchet wrench, remove the Lower Finish Panel Steel Crash Plate, behind the Instrument Lower Finish Panel (not shown below) Pay attention to screw sizes, types, and location, as well as count.
You do NOT need to disconnect the hood and fuel door cables, nor the throttle cable (if installed)
You do NOT need to remove the steering column clam shell or the steering wheel.

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4) Remove the Instrument Upper Finish Panel (Just above the steering column clamshell, but below the gauge cluster). This piece has multiple push-in pins and tabs to hold it in place.
You do NOT need to remove the gauge cluster.
5) Using one of the Phillips screwdrivers, remove the one screw that holds on the ignition switch lighted ring around the ignition key lock.
6) GENTLY persuade the lighted ring off the key cylinder.

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7) Using one of the Phillips screwdrivers, remove the two screws that hold on the Key Interlock Solenoid on the bottom of the Column Upper Bracket (the aluminum barrel looking thingy with the leg or post that hangs from the steering column)
8) Per the FSM, insert the key into the Key Cylinder, and turn it to the "ACC" position.
9) Using one of the Phillips screwdrivers, push UP on the pin in the bottom of the Column Upper Bracket below the Key Cylinder to release the Key Cylinder from it's location.
10) Pull the Key Cylinder from the Column Upper Bracket Housing.

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11) Using a pair of Needle Nose Pliers, grasp the flat blade inside the barrel of the Column Upper Bracket and GENTLY twist CCW as you GENTLY pull outward to remove the Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod, or whatever pieces there are of it. (MAKE NOTE OF THE ORIENTATION HOW IT IS WHEN YOU STARTED AND WHEN IT IS RELEASED) (MAKE NOTE OF WHEN YOU TURN CCW AND CW)
 
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IMG_20220712_203111922 (Medium).jpg

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12) Using the LONG Phillips screwdriver, remove the one screw from the back of the ignition switch. This can be a bit of contortion as the screw is on the BACK of the switch and you may have to do this blindly.


IMG_20220711_211914018 (Medium).jpg


13) GENTLY persuade the switch towards the front of the truck to remove it from the barrel. The wiring harness will resist a LOT. Go slow and gentle so you don't break anything. This is the only reason you removed the Light Ring and the Key interlock because otherwise the wires on those would prevent you from pulling it out of the barrel.
14) Look into the slot on the ignition switch to see if there is a piece of the Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod stuck in there. Mine broke off the 1/4" tip of the rod.
15) If there is a piece in there, use the handle of the screwdriver to bump the face of the switch to cause the piece to work it's way out. I also used the pick here to finish the job.

IMG_20220712_201447620 (Medium).jpg
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Last edited:
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16) Using the 1/4" flat blade screwdriver, actuate the switch through it's complete cycles from CCW all the way CW into the START position against the spring and back to confirm smooth operation of the switch itself. If it is not smooth and feels crunchy or the spring is broken, then this is the time for a new switch.

IMG_20220712_201940976 (Medium).jpg


17) Using a lint-free rag, wipe out the barrel interior to remove all the old key shavings and grease and dirt.
18) Clean up and prepare your replacement Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod. Using the Dielectric Grease (silicone grease), lube the end of the Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod, making sure to get it on the high wear areas. Don't get carried away with the lube. It doesn't need much.

IMG_20220712_202305818 (Medium).jpg

19) Using the Needle Nose Pliers, gently slide the replacement Rod back into the Barrel. Make sure to start in the correct orientation (I think it was upside down) and insert part way, then rotate CW, then insert a bit more, rotate CCW, then insert a bit more, then rotate CW until the tab is at the bottom and the tab is against the "shelf" inside the barrel.


IMG_20220712_203130721 (Medium).jpg
IMG_20220712_203022525 (Medium).jpg


IMG_20220712_203111922 (Medium).jpg


20) Clean up and lubricate your Key Cylinder. You can use electrical connection cleaner to spray in there, then after it dries, you can spray in silicone lubricant or spray dry graphite into the tumblers. The tumblers are on the TOP of the Key Cylinder, so turn it upside down to lubricate.
21) Insert the key into the Key Cylinder multiple times to work in the lubricant.
22) Smear a tiny bit of Dielectric Grease on the tip of the Key Cylinder "bayonet" where it inserts into the barrel.
23) Set the key to "ACC" in the Key Cylinder
 
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24) Insert the Key Cylinder into the barrel until it is seated properly. DO NOT FORCE IT. THIS SHOULD BE EASY AND SMOOTH.
25) You MAY have to re-orient the Rod so the flat tab that mates into the back of the Key Cylinder is about 30° left of straight up and down.

IMG_20220712_203311361 (Medium).jpg


IMG_20220712_203219061 (Medium).jpg


26) Actuate the key through full cycles CCW to CW and remove and reinsert the key and repeat multiple times to confirm smooth operation of the Key Cylinder and the Rod.
27) Feel around the back of the barrel to confirm the Rod tab is protruding out the back of the barrel. With the key still in the ACC position, it may not match the switch.

IMG_20220711_212415743 (Medium).jpg


28) Gently reinsert the Switch into the back of the barrel, taking note of the cutout in the switch body and how it was oriented when it came apart and the screw holes line up. You MAY have to rotate the key with one hand while placing gentle, firm pressure to the back of the switch to get the switch to seat onto the back of the barrel.
29) Insert the one screw into the back of the switch and snug it tight. Do not overtighten.
30) Install the Key Interlock Solenoid with the two screws and snug the screws. These can be tight since everything is metal, but don't twist off the screws. So....good and snug.
31) Insert the key into the Key Cylinder and actuate the key, cylinder, and switch multiple times to make sure there is smooth, quiet operation through the entire range, with the "stops" in the correct detents of the switch.
32) Clean up the lighted key ring with soap and water, dry it, and gently install it over the end of the Key Cylinder. Make sure to properly orient the one screw hole and wiring harness.
33) Insert the one screw into the lighted key ring and tighten it snugly. Do not overtighten, as it will crack the plastic assembly.
34) Install the Instrument Upper Finish Panel (Just above the steering column clamshell, but below the gauge cluster). This piece has multiple push-in pins and tabs to hold it in place. Make sure they are lined up before pressing each pin into its place. This piece fits snugly over the lighted key ring.

IMG_20220712_211854006 (Medium).jpg


35) Attach the Negative Battery Cable. Clean the posts and connections if necessary.
36) Cycle the key from OFF to RUN three times, pausing for 5 seconds in the RUN position each time. This helps with the start-up idle issues.
37) Start the truck. Confirm everything operates as it should.
38) Shut off the truck.
39) Install the Lower Finish Panel Steel Crash Plate, behind the Instrument Lower Finish Panel. Pay attention to screw sizes, types, and location, as well as count.
40) Install the Instrument Lower Finish Panel. Pay attention to screw sizes, types, and location, as well as count.

IMG_20220712_203802565 (Medium).jpg

41) Clean up and put away your tools, clean up your area, put all the payments in the swear jar.
42) Enjoy your truck, after all, 42 is the answer to everything.
 
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Additional Reference Pics:

IMG_20220711_211859908 (Medium).jpg
IMG_20220711_211925031 (Medium).jpg
IMG_20220711_211933307 (Medium).jpg
IMG_20220711_211948493 (Medium).jpg

IMG_20220712_204504226 (Medium).jpg
 
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Messages
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This is how my Ignition Lock Cylinder Barrel Rod broke. Original broken one is on the TOP in the first pic and on the RIGHT in the second pic.

In my case, I obtained a complete steering column section and figured out that all I really needed was the GUTS of the Key Lock Cylinder Barrel.

I actually ordered the following:
(Qty 1) Column Upper Bracket (Toyota P/N 45280-60290 ($173.96))
(Qty 2) Column Bolts, Toyota P/N 45897-12020 ($3.66 Each))

Toyota tells me they are currently on Nationwide Back Order and has no idea when they may be available. The bolts are in stock, but if you look closely, they are a torque-to-shear head bolt, so you MUST cut, drill, modify the head on the old ones to get them out. NOT an easy task. I was prepared to pay the price, gut the new part to install it on my truck.


IMG_20220711_212800995 (Medium).jpg



IMG_20220711_212843463 (Medium).jpg



Good Luck!

I hope if yours broke, it is somewhere close to home or in your driveway where you can get to it!

My MANY thanks to the folks near me that got me on the right track, in a hurry, as they are always my go-to guys:
@2fpower
and
@cjmoon

Either one usually has parts or parts trucks available and both are a WEALTH of knowledge. They are among the few that I would trust to work on MY truck.

Additional threads used for reference here:


From the 100 series threads:

I picked up an entire steering column section to make sure I had all the parts I might need. See below:
IMG_20220711_211956628 (Medium).jpg
 
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Less keys and 'stuff' hanging off your keychain would be something your ignition switch would thank you for :) All that mass helps to wear the key & key mechanism away as you bounce bounce bounce down the road mile after mile....

I had to replace the ignition switch on my oz patrol years ago, fortunately I had a new in box complete ignition switch along with the silly torque to shear bolts. After replacing, I was careful NOT to shear the silly bolts - it certainly doesn't prevent a thief stealing your vehicle and is just another pain in the rear end to deal with in the future. So, my hint is, don't shear the new ones or just used compatible bolts that are 'normal'.

cheers,
george.
 
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Less keys and 'stuff' hanging off your keychain would be something your ignition switch would thank you for :) All that mass helps to wear the key & key mechanism away as you bounce bounce bounce down the road mile after mile....

I had to replace the ignition switch on my oz patrol years ago, fortunately I had a new in box complete ignition switch along with the silly torque to shear bolts. After replacing, I was careful NOT to shear the silly bolts - it certainly doesn't prevent a thief stealing your vehicle and is just another pain in the rear end to deal with in the future. So, my hint is, don't shear the new ones or just used compatible bolts that are 'normal'.

cheers,
george.
In this case, it is not the load of the keys, as it is quite obvious from the tiny shard remaining in the ignition switch itself that it was due to the twisting motion against the spring of the switch itself.

I'll get a picture of the little shard and the end for better failure analysis by all.

Thanks George!

Your info will help others!
 
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In this case, it is not the load of the keys, as it is quite obvious from the tiny shard remaining in the ignition switch itself that it was due to the twisting motion against the spring of the switch itself.

I'll get a picture of the little shard and the end for better failure analysis by all.

Thanks George!

Your info will help others!

Yep, understood that the internal guts broke, I'm just mentioning that wear and tear on the key 'teeth' and tumblers etc are what all that 'metal dust debris' is and excess weight hanging of the ignition key doesn't help. Of course I have too much crap hanging off mine too :)

I crazy mate in oz has even a small crescent wrench hanging on his keys. He has enough keys that one probably would open fort knox. His reasoning for all the stuff is that it makes it harder for him to lose the keys - yet seems to spend 10 minutes before we leave looking for the keys since there's too much stuff to fit in his pocket and he drops them on a table, shelf, somewhere on entering the house. Dumb bastard :slap:

Great write up you put together for what appears to involve way too many steps versus a couple of bolts and unplug a connector on my old patrol. Designers of modern vehicles appear to love complicating stuff. I hate to imagine the madness in a newer 200 or 300 series. If one ever breaks down in one of them out bush it's probably best to just set fire to it and hope it is spotted by search and rescue :)

cheers,
george.
 

ToyotaMatt

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it's a good darn thing i am now fully stocked on these 🤔

- i CAN
RE-KEY / RE-CODE ANY 80 series 91-97 lock cylinder







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90999-00164  90999-00164 - Copy.jpeg




1619353648274.png
 
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it's a good darn thing i am now fully stocked on these 🤔

- i CAN
RE-KEY / RE-CODE ANY 80 series 91-97 lock cylinder


ill have new OEM
3pc and 4pc ALL matching keys lock cylinder sets also very very soon , :cool:









View attachment 3058656



View attachment 3058657
Too bad a lock cylinder won't fix this!
 

ToyotaMatt

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Too bad a lock cylinder won't fix this!


i can see that ,

but if you going to all the wonderfully outlined steps by steps you have archived , the chances of this unique but indeed ongoing occurring scenario would

strongly suggest both worn badly OEM or aftermarket keys & a worn badly and very very sloppy ignition lock cylinder with enough age and time normal use free-play ,

especially after the 200K + mileage range , that the above issue that you have perfectly outlined the repair for would in-part or whole be helped to its DOOM factor by

a said above badly worn out ignition lock cylinder , thus should they not be replaced as a NEW matched set if i can use that term since they directly mechanically


engage one another , metal to metal contact , magnesium to magnesium female to male slotted profiles ?



again AWSOME write up ! :) :beer:


matt
 
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wow, good work.

since you are now the resident expert on all things ignition switch, i'm wondering if you can help shed some light on why i can remove my key from the cylinder with the truck in gear OTHER than Park. in more detail, i can turn the key CCW and hits a stop at ACC, but pushing straight in on the cylinder allows me to continue to rotate to OFF and remove the key.

existing post: Ignition key can pull out of tumbler while in drive - https://forum.ih8mud.com/threads/ignition-key-can-pull-out-of-tumbler-while-in-drive.651792/post-14428427

i have the key interlock solenoid hanging, and can feel the solenoid pin extend during the test scenarios. the solenoid seems to give up some of its strength after ~1sec, and i can push it back in with little effort (which seems to match the FSM test cases). it passes a resistance check per the FSM. i can push up on the spring-loaded stop pin manually, and can't remove the key, but i'm not sure how far the solenoid pushes this stop pin.


so my question to you is, does removing the cylinder give visual access to the spring-loaded pin that the solenoid engages? might just be gummed up?i shot some wd-40 in there but it didnt help.

is removing the cylinder as easy as pushing in the stop pin and pulling the cylinder out? i still have the ignition trim installed (includes key warning switch, light housing, etc).
 

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