LX450 integrated phone options

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by skywalkerguy, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. skywalkerguy

    skywalkerguy

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    Has anyone done anything cool with the stupid built-in Lexus phone?

    Can you use the hook-ups for a modern day phone, like a Nextel i730?

    Mine has the controls on the steering wheel as well. It seems to have signal, but obviously no servcie provider. When you hit the big buuton on the steering wheel it takes it off hook to start dialing. i'm sure this was all prety cool in 1896, I mean 1996...
     
  2. skywalkerguy

    skywalkerguy

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    Here's the steering wheel controls...
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2007
  3. Bob_Garrett

    Bob_Garrett

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    I'm pretty sure that those were analog phones and the analog systems, except for rural areas of the country, have been replaced with newer digital systems and the Lexus won't work with those and it definately won't work on Nextel's network.

    In theory, if there is a car kit for the i730 and you had a wiring diagram of the Lexus system, it *might* be possible to build an interface between the two so that you could use the Lexus controls. Seems like a lot of work for the reward, since in all likelyhood, you'll get a new phone within a couple of years anyway.

    Bob
     
  4. skywalkerguy

    skywalkerguy

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    You are so right about analog vs. digital. I hadn't thought of that aspect. So, anybody want to buy an awesome Lexus integrated phone??? LOL
     
  5. RWD

    RWD SILVER Star

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    Thanks for posting the pic. I've always wanted to know what they look like. I feel left out because I don't have one....
     
  6. Cattledog

    Cattledog

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    I have the phone too. 911 still works and the analog system puts out about 3 watts. The phone typically has service all the time. I have kept it for emergancies.
     
  7. 97 FZJ80

    97 FZJ80

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    If you can use your digital phone, stay with it for those 911 calls. The dirty little secret in the wireless industry is that they can pinpoint your cell phone location with amazing accuracy, especially on the digital networks. This is helpful for the dispatcher to quickly get help to your location.
     
  8. Bob_Garrett

    Bob_Garrett

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    That is the case for virtually all phones built within the last couple of years. For older analog phones, that's not true. The new digital phones (and networks) have accurate locating capabilities which was mandated by the FCC. Also, analog networks are primarily only used in rural areas. The rural areas consist mainly of widely spaced, very tall towers, which maximize the coverage of each cell. While the cell phone company can pinpoint which tower you're using , that cell may be covering an area of over 700 sq mi.

    The older analog phones (which operate at higher power levels) will give you greater coverage in rural areas, but don't count on the phone company being able to pinpoint your location well enough to find you in an emergency.

    Bob
     
  9. Cattledog

    Cattledog

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    I understand and agree your point with digital 911 location service.

    I typically drive with my family in the winter in vermont along rt 89 near Burlington. The anlog service has been great vs the crappy at best digital service. 99% of the time I know where I am in Vt, so having any service more important to me than being digitally located. :cheers:
     
  10. Harridig

    Harridig

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    I have got a Motorolla phone box hidden under the carpet on the PS of my 80. I don't have the cool controls like that though!!

    Been wanting to yank mine phone out! Would pulling the wires cause any problems that I need to be aware of?

    Anyone done this before?

    Any benefits of leaving it in there?

    Derek
     
  11. skywalkerguy

    skywalkerguy

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    My happens to be mounted in the top center console. Talk about taking up room. And the controls on the steering wheel get in the way of my knee while driving, drinking coffee, talkinging on the phone, looking stuff up, writing stuff down...

    The transmitter is in the left rear storage area with an inside mounted antenna on the rear glass panel.

    I'm just trying to figure out whether I should leave any of wiring in place as well. Although having an analog phone that will dial 911 while in the rurals is a nice idea, I'm not much on losing the storage space or hearing the phone turn on everytime I start the truck.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2007
  12. Harridig

    Harridig

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    Dang that is crazy! I tried to google the model and make of my phone base, but found nothing.

    I will have to look more into this when I get home. I don't have any actual phone like you do though. I am leaning towards pulling mine out. You definately have more to worry about though!!

    Thanks for the pictures!!!

    That sure does take up all your room to carry a sidearm though! :D

    Derek
     
  13. Bob_Garrett

    Bob_Garrett

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    Current FCC rules require that by the end of 2005, 95% of each wireless company's customers have digital phones containing chips that allow emergency operators to pinpoint a person's location when a call is placed to 911. The FCC has also told the cellular companies that they can phase out analog service by 2008. I suspect that once all of their customers are switched over to digital, they will soon phase out the analog service to avoid maintaining seperate systems. Once that happens, the analog phones will be unusable, even for 911 calls.

    If you travel to areas that don't have sufficent coverage with the newer digital/analog phones, I would keep the old analog phone for now. Over time it is likely that the digital coverage will fill in many of the current coverage holes as the cell companies build more towers and improve coverage from existing ones.

    Bob
     
  14. Cattledog

    Cattledog

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    Thanks for the info Bob. I had no idea that the FCC was going to allow the phase out of analog service.
     
  15. 97 FZJ80

    97 FZJ80

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    Hi Bob,

    Seeing that you're from Kansas, I would hazard a guess that you have some knowledge of how Sprint works their E911 location systems. This is a thread hijack to post some reference information on the E911 phase II mandate for locating a wireless handset.

    * For network-based solutions: 100 meters for 67 percent of calls, 300 meters for 95 percent of calls. This is implemented by almost all the GSM carriers using E-TDOA technology. (e.g. AT&T/Cingular, T-Mobile)
    * For handset-based solutions: 50 meters for 67 percent of calls, 150 meters for 95 percent of calls. This is implemented by almost all the CDMA carriers and Nextel using GPS/aGPS technology (e.g. SprintPCS, Verizon, Alltel, and Nextel).

    What does this all mean? The FCC mandates only require the wireless carriers to locate a handset within the the statistical average stated above, and the wireless service providers have no obligations (nor liability) to provide a fault-proof system for everyone. This could mean that when YOU dial 911, you fall under the other 5% and they cannot pinpoint your location. Here are my recommendations:

    * For people who used their wireless phones mainly in the densely populated areas, stick with a digital phone. The CDMA system and GSM systems each has its own advantages and disadvantages, so I consider them a wash.
    * For people who live to travel often to the sparsely populated areas, I recommend getting a dual mode digital/analog phone.
    * If you are still having reception problems due to the distance from the antenna towers, I recommend getting a repeater/amplifier.
    * The TY and other Canadians, I recommend Bell Mobility, as they are the only carrier in Canada that could meet the accuracy mandate of FCC today.
    * For the other 5%, I recommend H&K ;)

    John
     
  16. Bob_Garrett

    Bob_Garrett

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    Good Info, John. The only thing that I would add is that I think that all of the CDMA phones currently on the market have both digital and analog capabilites. Sprint also has a phone that can do GSM as well. It's primarily designed for folks that travel overseas.

    Bob
     
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