Looking for welding dvd for newb (1 Viewer)

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Aug 11, 2004
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Burlington, VT.
I have been thinking about getting a 110v mig. I really do not have much experence working with metal. I would like to put together my new metal tech cage. Then have a pro weld all of the joints. Since I have lots of animals like chickens, goats, horses and such there is lots of stuff that needs welding around here. Thanks for any advice.
 
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I dont really get the thing about the goats welding. I would just like to get pointed in the right direction. The animals brake a lot of hardware, that could be welded. I just end up replacing everything, and it is expensive. Albee
 
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Feb 9, 2002
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so you have a welder but want a dvd to teach you how to use it?
i'm pretty new to mig-welding, but i found it works best for me to just start welding metal together.
"What Metal?" you ask.... anything i could find. I started by going to a machine shop in town and digging through the dumpster for scrap steel of different thicknesses. Then I started welding 1/4" to 1/4". Then i tried some 3/8 to 3/8. Then I started having fun with 1/16 to 1/4, and so on and so on and.......

if your looking for a welder to get and it has to be 110v, one of those little lincoln 135 units would probably do some light stuff (less than 1/4").
i think miller or hobart or someone makes one that can run 220v and 110v, but it's more expensive.
 
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Jacksonville, FL
I got a couple videos from Eastwood. (www.eastwoodcompany.com). Don't recall off the top of my head which ones, but they were all helpful. Get a video, look at it 2-3 times and then get some scrap metal and practice. It is really pretty easy, but takes a lot of practice to do it well (good penetration on both sides).

Make sure you use gas. I started practice before I bought the gas cylinder, but the gas makes a BIG difference :D
 
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Burlington, VT.
Thanks
I guess I will just jump in and give it a go. It will not be the first thing I have learned by trial and error. If I can spring for the 220v unit I will.
 
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I've heard (an I'm learning also, so no expert by any stretch) that the 220v units are harder to regulate at low currents for doing sheetmetal. They are obviously way better for heavier stuff.

If you are doing a lot of heavy guage steel, 220v will be better. If you do a lot of light stuff, the 110v may be better.

I'm going to be doing mostly sheetmetal, so I got a 110v unit. When I do bigger things, I figure it will take me more passes, but I should still be able to weld heavier steel (ie. it may take me 2-3 passes to do what a 220v unit could do in one pass).
 
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Soul_Man said:
I've heard (an I'm learning also, so no expert by any stretch) that the 220v units are harder to regulate at low currents for doing sheetmetal. They are obviously way better for heavier stuff.


soul Man, I wouldn't agree with that. For thin steel with a powerful welder you just turn down the power and/or use thinner wire. No big deal about it.
 
Joined
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Burlington, VT.
I could not swing the extra funds for the 220 model so I got a Miller 135. I looked around a while and it was the best deal I could find around here. $800 for the welder, 60cu bottle, extra wire, tips, gloves, coat, mask and the benifit of have made friends with the guys that work in the local shop. Miller has a deal that when you buy the welder, you can get a stack of good welding books and a denim coat all for $20. Ready or not welding world here I come. Thanks for the input.
 

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