Looking for a good pic of the inspection stamps on heaters, like the one below

Tanker120

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I am going to see if I can get a stamp made, I know the top part and middle, but can't make out the bottom
20211212_123403.jpg
 
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Not sure if it helps, but this was the paper flavor that went on things like the rear seats and front seatback guards.

I think the top roughly translated to "Inspected", and the smaller block was along the lines of manufacture-date. If you can figure out what it's supposed to say, it's easier to then just render the actual Japanese vs trying to make an image from the stamp. It's pretty smeary, but it does look like the upper symbol on the stamp is the same as the first on the paper version:

Screen Shot 2021-12-12 at 6.25.51 PM.png
 
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I am going to see if I can get a stamp made, I know the top part and middle, but can't make out the bottom
View attachment 2863336
This is an interesting effort. The date on this corresponds to Showa year 52 which is 1977 in the western calendar. Japanese dates are usually year-month-day, so this one is October 14, 1977. Are you thinking that any inspection stamp which you build will just have a random date on it? Or maybe some date that has particular significance for you? The bottom is hard to read, but it is very likely the katakana last name of the inspector. It would be the most authentic if you figured out how to spell your own last name in katakana and had that put on the stamp. These stamps are readily available in Japan at any hardware or department store and only cost about $20 US. I have one of my own but it just has my name on it. They can be custom ordered with whatever you want on them. Do you have anyone you know currently residing in Japan who could have one made for you?
 

Tanker120

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This is an interesting effort. The date on this corresponds to Showa year 52 which is 1977 in the western calendar. Japanese dates are usually year-month-day, so this one is October 14, 1977. Are you thinking that any inspection stamp which you build will just have a random date on it? Or maybe some date that has particular significance for you? The bottom is hard to read, but it is very likely the katakana last name of the inspector. It would be the most authentic if you figured out how to spell your own last name in katakana and had that put on the stamp. These stamps are readily available in Japan at any hardware or department store and only cost about $20 US. I have one of my own but it just has my name on it. They can be custom ordered with whatever you want on them. Do you have anyone you know currently residing in Japan who could have one made for you?
Thanks for the info, that is a great Idea, I do not know anyone in Japan, but will see if I can get one made here in the states-thanks again!
 
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Something to consider, is that Japanese industrial inspection stamps don't necessarily follow a consistent pattern, even within the same production facility. Their purpose was purely functional, so as long as you could reference it back to a particular inspector, on a particular date, then it fulfilled its purpose. You can see from the above photos that the inspection stamps differ within a few short years. Sometimes the date stamp refers back to a particular crew of 10-20 people, and the corresponding number stamp (i.e. 12 or 13 in the above photos) corresponds which person in that crew was the actual inspector. Other times, the date stamp itself refers to a single person. Since Japanese is not my first language, I will try to send some of the above photos to my people in Japan and see if I can get a better translation. UPDATE - I just flew the request for a translation to one of my industrial engineers in Japan. I don't expect to hear back until maybe Wednesday at the earliest, so standby.
 
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Ok, I got my response from my Industrial Engineer in Japan. Basically, everything I said in the above two posts still holds true. The top Kanji in all the above photos translates directly to "Inspection". If an inspection stamp has three numbers in the middle row, then the numbers refer to Year-Month-Day. 52-10-14 translates to October 14, 1977. If there are only two numbers in the middle row, then it's just Month-Day with no year shown. One of the later model heaters in the photos above looks like 1-23 which is January 23, and the other looks like 3-8, which is March 8. No year shown for either of these. The bottom number in your stamp (it's super blurred) is likely not kanji, nor katakana, but the western number 10 or maybe 13. Any number that stands alone such as 10, 13, 19, etc. as well as the extra stamp with just this number in it, likely refers to a specific inspector or crew of 10-20 people, but it's difficult to know exactly unless you work at that facility, because they differ from plant to plant. I attached a better picture of the kanji if you'd like to replicate it. Hope this all helps.

Kanji for Inspection.gif
 

middlecalf

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52 = 77 ?

Looks like inspector 19 was busy.

I see the letter L then a number (e.g. 23, 8) in a couple of those. December? That’d be like the Aisin carb dating, letter (year) then number (month).
 
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Showa 52=1977. It’s the Showa era which refers to Emporer Hirohito. 1926 until 1986 if I remember correctly. Then it started over with Heisei. EDIT Hirohito died in 89 not 86 so Heisei started in 1989.
 
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52 = 77 ?

Looks like inspector 19 was busy.

I see the letter L then a number (e.g. 23, 8) in a couple of those. December? That’d be like the Aisin carb dating, letter (year) then number (month).
Good eye. I didn’t mention it before but we talked about that very stamp and my engineer said that what looks like an L is more likely a 1 with a period after. That would be consistent with the 3 in the other picture. Your theory is sound however.
 

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