Long term part storage

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serenity

serenity

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So I’ve been looking at my collection of 80 series parts over the weekend and it got me thinking about the best way too maintain them long term. I already spray preservative on anything bare steel, but what about gaskets, seals and other assorted items?

@OGBeno are there any recommendations from Toyota?

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ToyotaMatt

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So I’ve been looking at my collection of 80 series parts over the weekend and it got me thinking about the best way too maintain them long term. I already spray preservative on anything bare steel, but what about gaskets, seals and other assorted items?

@OGBeno are there any recommendations from Toyota?

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there is indeed one way or path forward that Barret Jackson both recommends and critiques .......

ongoing as we speak towards completion ...







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22   Copy   Copy
 
matty_sunn1

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Started out with a shelf that looks similar. Now it's all Plastic bins. Everything gets cleaned up if it's used, smaller items get bagged. Label everything what it came from (year/model) and year it came off/bought . New parts seperate from used. One of my struggles was throwing away my "spare parts" I don't need 10+ worn belts just incase I need 1 band new set of belts.
Next thing I want to do is make an inventory book. Half the battle is knowing what you have. I know we get used to spending 2 hours rummaging to find that one part, but that means potential damage or misplacing other parts.
 
Comet

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I prefer cardboard boxes in unconditioned garages with either cement or dirt floors. Hydrostatic pressure when it rains is also a great opportunity to recatalog your parts. I joke but that was my SOP for years.
 
jpoole

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Half the battle is knowing what you have

This is the main piece of this that I'm still trying to figure out. I rushed my initial storage (plastic bins) and inventory lists (paper lists taped to side of the bins) and over time I have moved things around enough to make the lists out of date. My lists were mostly of the larger parts so I dig for the smaller bits I sometimes need. I'm installing new shelves for these parts now and am going to move from the larger bins to smaller boxes so that I don't have to dig as much when I want to find something. Not sure if I'll use labels on the boxes again or number the boxes and create digital lists or just group things by what they are for and hope for the best. Hopefully someone will drop some great ideas here that are easy to implement and maintain.
 
serenity

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HVAC controlled whenever possible.

Or, just sitting on the ground with you walking around them all the time.

That works too. f*** it.

I’ve run that method, as well as the leaving them to float around in the back of the car for 2 years method, neither were ideal.
 
serenity

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serenity

serenity

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This is the main piece of this that I'm still trying to figure out. I rushed my initial storage (plastic bins) and inventory lists (paper lists taped to side of the bins) and over time I have moved things around enough to make the lists out of date. My lists were mostly of the larger parts so I dig for the smaller bits I sometimes need. I'm installing new shelves for these parts now and am going to move from the larger bins to smaller boxes so that I don't have to dig as much when I want to find something. Not sure if I'll use labels on the boxes again or number the boxes and create digital lists or just group things by what they are for and hope for the best. Hopefully someone will drop some great ideas here that are easy to implement and maintain.
I’ve gone and individually bagged and tagged items such as seals with their oem part numbers and description.

Bolts I currently have sorted by size, they are an easy one.

The worst part is genuine gaskets for the 1hd-ft, a lot of them are a sandwiched metal style and I’ve had the metal warp in some of them while they were sitting on the shelf.

Also had the rubber boots perish on a new set of fj60 brake slave cylinders.
 
DSRTRDR

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Started out with a shelf that looks similar. Now it's all Plastic bins. Everything gets cleaned up if it's used, smaller items get bagged. Label everything what it came from (year/model) and year it came off/bought . New parts seperate from used. One of my struggles was throwing away my "spare parts" I don't need 10+ worn belts just incase I need 1 band new set of belts.
Next thing I want to do is make an inventory book. Half the battle is knowing what you have. I know we get used to spending 2 hours rummaging to find that one part, but that means potential damage or misplacing other parts.
you are behind the curve: I have an Excel spreadsheet

and I pack used parts into boxes, all labeled - and new parts that I intend to stand one of these days are in open trays; the kind you get from your friendly Toyota dealer :D - I have one tray for the 80, and another for the LX

but there are still parts that need to be sorted into final resting places . . .

my system works reasonably well: even though they hadn't made it into the spreadsheet yet, it took less than 2 minutes to find the used booster/master assembly for the 40 that had come off in 2015, and I also managed to find the "hot feet gasket" for the LX, in the "new-parts-for-the-LX tray", in no time :grinpimp:
 
DSRTRDR

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Kevin taught me that rubber can be conditioned for storage with brake fluid

and then there's also this Honda rubber cream . . . which I just ordered but haven't applied to anything yet :hmm:
 
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Generally, new parts are in the bags/boxes they were sent to me in. I keep a record of what I've ordered so I know what I have on hand. I don't keep endless stockpiles of belts, gaskets and things like that, just enough to cover the next service then I'll order some more, oil filters and the like being the exception that I tend to keep a few extra on hand. Where I replace an old part for new that's not totally shot, it goes back into the bag/box the new one came out of, and onto a different shelf. That's for your basic daily items.

When it comes to some bigger metal items I have in long-term storage, like spare diff centres, axles, hubs, things like that, I pick a day without much humidity, slather them with a heavy engine oil, and entomb them a wide plastic roll, basically clingwrap. Pretty comfortable with that long term.
 
leonard_nemoy

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SOP LC-ZJ80-A1

Proper storage of spare parts storage

1.Scope: The purpose of this SOP is to set a standard for the proper storage of spare FZJ80 Toyota Land cruiser Parts.

2. Definitions: For the purpose of this SOP the term parts refers to all hard and soft parts commonly used for maintenance on 80 series Toyota land cruisers.

3. Procedure:

3A: All spare parts for Toyota FZJ80 land cruisers will be stored in a climate controlled building. Temperatures are not to exceed 80 degrees F and shall be maintained above 40 degrees F. Humidity levels shall not exceed 60% and humidity levels shall be maintained above 20%.

3B: The storage building used will have three forms of temperature and humidity recording devices that can track temperatures and humidity levels. One of these devices must be capable of sounding an alarm when parameters are out of range.

Alright, that's all I got.

This is what happens when you work in a lab and read SOP's all day long lol.
 
dsmud4u

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SOP LC-ZJ80-A1

Proper storage of spare parts storage

1.Scope: The purpose of this SOP is to set a standard for the proper storage of spare FZJ80 Toyota Land cruiser Parts.

2. Definitions: For the purpose of this SOP the term parts refers to all hard and soft parts commonly used for maintenance on 80 series Toyota land cruisers.

3. Procedure:

3A: All spare parts for Toyota FZJ80 land cruisers will be stored in a climate controlled building. Temperatures are not to exceed 80 degrees F and shall be maintained above 40 degrees F. Humidity levels shall not exceed 60% and humidity levels shall be maintained above 20%.

3B: The storage building used will have three forms of temperature and humidity recording devices that can track temperatures and humidity levels. One of these devices must be capable of sounding an alarm when parameters are out of range.

Alright, that's all I got.

This is what happens when you work in a lab and read SOP's all day long lol.
Or in the Army…checks out.
 
LINUS

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I’ve used Rubbermaid containers kept inside / no sunlight that whole wall for all my random crap.

If you really want to get crazy you could do used military tank projectile canisters & number them / keep a list either on paper or in Excel. :meh:
 
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Nemesis1207

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I feel dirty and unworthy :frown::oops:
Don't, the way I wrote about the way I store stuff, you're probably imagining some kind of neat categorised storage system, with everything sorted by size and function in their own little bays. In reality, it's a bunch of unsorted crap in boxes sitting on a shelf, that I spend far too long rummaging through looking for that one part I need, while muttering obsenities to myself. I'm just more careful with the large metal parts nowadays because after having engines apart in the past, and having to clean up surface rust when I had things out longer than I planned and didn't store them properly, I force myself to take more care now because my lazy ass doesn't want to deal with the consequences later.
 

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