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Linoleum

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Critter, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. Critter

    Critter

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    Anyone installed linoleum before?

    How difficult and what are the steps involved with removal of old linoleum, preparation, and installation of new linoleum.

    Are the squares worth a crap? Seems as though they would be easier to install…

    For reference this is for a 20 year old trailer one of my friends lives in. We are looking for something decent not super nice.
     
  2. Jman

    Jman

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    Technically, I don't think it's called linoleum--true linoleum is oil-soaked paper and hasn't been used for decades--I think you're talking about vinyl or composite flooring (commonly called linoleum though).

    Vinyl composite squares are pretty easy to install and give the area a nice retro look. Two things, though: any imperfections in the subfloor--seams, dents, etc. will show through after a while, so you need to fill them in before installing to make a nice smooth subfloor; and, you need to HEAT the tiles before cutting them (torch works fine, but beware the fumes).

    I've seen subway cars with the squares in them--they can really take a beating.

    I think the the sheet vinyl flooring is too soft and tears easily, so I'd avoid it.

    Good luck.
     
  3. patride71

    patride71

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    i would avoid the squares because they seem to pop loose too much from what i have seen. at least in a glue down application they do. those squares that Jman is referring to were probably applied with a heavy mastic and are probably VA tiles that can take a huge beating. i think sheet vinyl is ok depending on how thick it is. it will tear fairly easily, but only if dragging things across it....
     
  4. Jman

    Jman

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    Here's the stuff I put down:

    [​IMG]

    http://www.congoleum.com/com-products.php?product_line=choices

    Commercial grade Congoleum squares, and I had to apply the adhesive with a trowel. Eight years later, still looks pretty good, and this is a HIGH traffic area. I got a few scratches, was able to sand them out with a little emory paper.

    Don't do the peel and stick stuff, that's crap.
     
  5. BLKDOG40

    BLKDOG40

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    I'd stay away from the self sticking tiles. The glue down ones do pretty well if you prepped well enough and the floor is smooth & level

    sheet vinyl - The better wearing & thicker = more expensive of course

    prep-
    Fill cracks & holes on the subfloor with a self leveling compound - smooth out any lumps or ridges with a scrapper.
    Get the area very very very clean. No dirt, dust, bits of crud or you will have it under your new floor and it might not stick too well or you'll get a little rock poking though.

    installing isn't too hard and two people makes it a bit easier.
    read the directions on the glue- use the recommended trowel

    Installing sheet vinyl may involve joining seams - use the recommended seam sealer for the product you are installing or your seam might discolor or pop up.
     
  6. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Moderator

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    Sheet vinyl is of the devil. Unless you've done it before or know someone who has, I wouldn't recommend installing it yourself.

    The self stick tiles are great. Nothing but good luck with them. I've helped two friends redo kitchens and mud rooms with them. Best thing about them, if one gets damaged, you just peel up that tile and replace it (buy a dozen extra).

    Most of the time you can just apply the tiles right to existing vinyl, just clean it good before.
     
  7. Critter

    Critter

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    Yea the more I am looking into sheet vinyl looks like a pain in the ass.

    I may look into the squares cause A) its cheap and B) it atleast looks easy.

    It's up to her since it is her trailer though... thanks for the help.
     
  8. 72FJ40LandCruiser

    72FJ40LandCruiser

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    The self-stick squares are a cinch, but like previously mentioned, you must make sure the surface is prepped properly. It must be smooth, and clean of course.

    I'm a big fan of the ceramic type tile. Sure it's a lot more expensive, but it will last for a very, very long time. You just gotta be sure to seal the grout and keep it clean. It bugs me when businesses install ceramic tile in restrooms and don't seal the grout and keep it clean. Around the edges of the bathroom the grout is the original light color and everywhere else it's dark and nasty. It bugs the s*** out of me. OK, so I'm weird.