Lightforce install on the new Slee Bumper

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I recently finished installing my dimmable lightforce 170s on the Slee shortbus bumper and finally got to use them in a real situation. I'm pretty happy with this setup.

First a picture of the front end:

lightforce.jpg



My goal was to provide very bright wide angle lighting, with the added ability to provide softer area lighting for setting up camp at night. I also wanted to be able to set the aux lights come on only with the high beams, along with manual on and off.

I went with the lightforce 170s, and added the wide angle lenses. They provide lots of light, and give great wide angle visibility at night.

Since the Slee bumper has so much room in the winch box, I decided that while I was at it I'd add a power station up front, with both 12v cig style connector and a high current connector as well.

I decided on this basic schematic, although some connections, i.e. switch illumnation, are not shown:

lightwiring.jpg


**EDIT** I had to make one change after I drew this schematic. It turns out that the hot leads at the high beams go hot whenever the high beams or the mains are on. It's the path to ground that is controlled by the OEM high beam switch. I had to make a "not" gate to compensate for the high beam mirror mode to work.

I used the Blue Sea 7505 20 amp digital dimmer:

dimmer.jpg


It's digital, and I know it's using pulse modulation because of the slight humming I hear at low output. It should be very efficient, in spite of the big heat sink. Marine electric designs are always very conservative.

I used extra rear heater and antenna up/down switches for in-dash control:

lightcontrol.jpg


The camera flash makes the buttons look a bit sloppy, but in real life the color matches pretty well. I used vinyl self-adhesive film and an inkjet printer.

And I used a generic water-tight plastic box to house the connectors. I used a 40 amp trolling motor connector for the high current, and added the matching plug to my high current devices. This gives me a quick and easy way to connect my compressor, an extra inverter, etc. The trolling motor connector seemed like the most convenient physical shape that provided a high current connection. The cig connector is there for anything else up to 15 amps.


power.jpg


I added a 8 guage wire with a 50amp fuse to run power from my 2nd battery to a blue sea fuse box, and distribute the power from smaller fuses in the box.

fuses.jpg


I used part of the slee upgraded wiring harness to tap into the high beams and send it to the control switch.


This project turned out to be a lot more difficult than I thought, and I ended up installing it twice. I got it working with the first install, but it was a bit of a birds nest. I then re-did the controls with some seven strand marine signal wire, and essentially built a harness.

Even though it was a bit of a bitch, and it turned out to be pretty expensive, I'm happy enough with the results that I think it was well worth it.
 
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Thats one nice setup, I like the idea of dimming the driving lights for camp/worklights. Two uses in one.
 
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I have the same bumper and would not mount any large lights above that hoop. My wheeling last weekend showed me just how vulnerable that position is. I think if I ever mount bumper lights to it they will be much smaller, and hang below the tube.

Just be careful with those nice lights!
 
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I have the same bumper and would not mount any large lights above that hoop. My wheeling last weekend showed me just how vulnerable that position is. I think if I ever mount bumper lights to it they will be much smaller, and hang below the tube.

Just be careful with those nice lights!

How exactly is this location vulnerable? It seems you'd have to conciously drive right into something directly in your line of sight in order to break them.

Note that they do not extend forward of the bumper.

Anything hanging below the tube would have to stick out well foward of the bar, and they'd become your bumper. You'd also have space conflicts with the winch.
 

NorCalDoug

problems solved daily...
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Doc spent a bit of time sliding in mud last week...

I have a pair of 240s on my ARB and they stick out a bit in front of the bumper. As long as you're not sliding into something, you should be fine with your set up...

I used to believe fervently that lightforces were indestructible, but after how desertdude's 240s shattered last year...I'm less than sure now.




That's a very nice set up. :cheers:
 

Cruiserdrew

On the way there
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I used to believe fervently that lightforces were indestructible, but after how desertdude's 240s shattered last year...I'm less than sure now.

That's a very nice set up. :cheers:


Now Doug-The fact that DesertDude shattered his lightforces was not exactly a random act of god! It had something to do with a non-random collision with an immovable object, ie the Hanna bumper on the back of David's (Yep) truck.

Since then DD has gone on to make a career of similar incidents!:D
 
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Doc spent a bit of time sliding in mud last week...

Not only that, but if you drop down into a big 'ol pit of mud those lights will get dipped. Also, the lights become your spreading points for branches that hang across the trail.

I'm not saying you can't mount your lights there, I'm just saying you have to be aware that they are not as protected as with other bars on the market.
 
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Sooo... How much for a kit? LOL! Hey i'm not an electrical kind of guy.... Im more mechanical. if anything..... Oh and don't 4get to include your labor in price.:D:cheers:

I didn't keep close track, but this ended up being too expensive to be commercially viable. I used all marine grade stuff and Toyota OEM, so it could be done cheaper, but I probably put $500 into this not counting the lights themselves.

This also sucked up a lot of hours, as turning the schematic into a nice clean implementation was a bitch.

So... my contribution to the efforts of others was taking the pictures in this thread, and in a few other threads where I was figuring out part numbers for the switches and the proper termination.

Good luck. :flipoff2:

T.
 

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