Landcruiser Sucks in Snow (1 Viewer)

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Jul 21, 2003
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Wilmington, NC
Well, I finally got my new shocks and tires on last week( Pro compXterrain). A local club was doing a X-mass tree run Sat. and I decided it would be a good time to check out the new tires in the snow. I will get right to the point...I got shuck more times Sat. then I have ever been stuck!! The landcruiser would just not go in the snow. It was about 2 to 3 feet deep and I would just sink!! I watched Toyota trucks with the same size tires just walk right over where I was framed out. My lockers seemed to do nothing, becuase most of the time I was sitting on the frame. Why was my L/C not going good? Was it because of the weight? Or should I have gotting some wider tires (I have 285). I got the cruiser because I thought it would be a good snow machine. I really made it my LC look bad sat. I just could not believe how much better the other people did in the snow.

Tim
 

woody

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in snow, air pressure is everything....I run 2-3 psi with my SX's, ran 10-12 with my old 33" MT's.
 
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In 2-3' of snow you're gonna need chains and to air down, I haven't heard good things about those tires in the snow either, Brad.
 

ginericLC

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Tires could be part of the problem. What air pressure did you run? I've found that running unlocked in snow is usually better. Also, you are pushing a lot more weight than a Toyota truck. You need to drive differently than they do to do the same section.
 
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Ill second or third or fourth or whatever on the airing down. on the x terrains I would probably run 15-18 psi in snow and the ultimate key to any snow wheeling in a vehicle this heavy is slow down. you will be far ahead of the game if you just stay off the throttle. also once you start to spin let off back up and try again. the gas pedal is your enemy in snow take it easy and you will be better off.
Dave
 
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Thanks for all the input. I did not air down. And I was on the gas pretty hard. I am from NC and not use to this snow stuff. Now that I think about it I mostly got stuck by nailing the gas and just sitting on the frame. I guess it takes some practice to wheel in the deep stuff. Next time I will air down to about 10 PSI and take it slow. Thanks for all of your help. I hope next time I do better so everybody doesn't laugh at my Cruiser suck in the snow!! I will post some stuck pics in a few days. It just made me so Pissed to see those toyota trucks glide right over the snow while I just sank!!!! :-[

Tim
 

landtank

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I haven't mounted my X-Terrains yet but my BFG ATs had no problem with 3' deep snow. But I have 315s and it wasn't trail use either. Trouble with speed is instead of plowing your way through you start to pack it down and ride up on it. As far as the other trucks, with the same tire and their lighter weight they are going to float a little better as well.
 
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I was not sure if I shoule have locked the front and rear or not. I had them locked up and It did not seem to do any better than trucks that had no lockers. so I guess you are saying do not use lockers in the snow????

Tim
 
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[quote author=landtank link=board=2;threadid=8803;start=msg75947#msg75947 date=1071510515]
I haven't mounted my X-Terrains yet but my BFG ATs had no problem with 3' deep snow. But I have 315s and it wasn't trail use either. Trouble with speed is instead of plowing your way through you start to pack it down and ride up on it. As far as the other trucks, with the same tire and their lighter weight they are going to float a little better as well.
[/quote]

With the snow wheeling knowledge I have gained living in Montana for the last 6 years, I have found that speed is key, when applicable,, with deep powder my 62 seems to do best in 4 hi and hitting it at a decent clip. This allows the heavy cruiser to do just what you say is bad,, ride up on it and pack it down. Application of 4-low has always ended up digging me down to the frame rails. Think about it, lighter trucks have an easier timme because they do just that, float and compact, this is also the reason you want to air down your tires. Granted there are somme scary situations where speed will kill you, but I have found speed is the one thing that keeps me going farther and everytime I stop, I dig till I can get back on top. Just my long winded .02cents.
 

ginericLC

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The answer to this question is not obvious for all conditions. In Montana powder on smooth roads, speed works. Especially to get through the the drifts. On a trail especially in wet snow, speed is just going to break stuff and get you stuck. Before living in Idaho I lived in Montana and when I was up there I drove a mini with skinny tires 9.50s. Speed was the only way I could get to work. 12 miles of unplowed gravel roads is what I had to travel each morning that would drift up to 6 feet deep. But, speed also kicked my butt a time or two. I have pictures of my Subaru 4wd wagon buried over the hood. I hit a drift at 60mph and didn't make it through. I had to crawl out the hatch because the doors wouldn't open and the snow was above the window. Another thing I've found useful when on non paved roads is to not fight the steering wheel. If there is enough room let the vehicle go and let your momentum carry you even if you aren't on the line you wanted. Slowing down and fighting the wheel sometimes gets you stuck. It is pretty hard to have a tried and true method in snow because there are so many variables.
 

Vlad

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"Snow", "Deep Snow", and "Deep Wet Snow" are three very different animals.

I would say technique matters most, so...it is you. :flipoff2:

This is why I moved to Georgia....6 inches in the mountains and everyone buys out the milk and bread 30 miles away.
 
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If you are talking about an 80 series, they are almost too heavy in the snow unless you go with some really big tires.

Think about this- the 80 weighs double what a mini truck weighs. In the super deep stuff, the minis, sammis and willys can pull the valve core out and run at 0 pressure.

I have a lot of fun in my 40, and have taken my 80 out too - but the 80 weighs 2000 lbs more than the 40, and I have wayyy bigger tires on the 40. I can also tell you I have stuck the 80 in snow up to the doorhandles! :doh:

I won't say that an 80 can't snow wheel (look at the Icelandic trucks) but they need a whole lot more mods to deal with the weight -(look at the Icelandic trucks)

Jim

Jim
 
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[quote author=TLCObsession link=board=2;threadid=8803;start=msg76002#msg76002 date=1071514681]
I won't say that an 80 can't snow wheel (look at the Icelandic trucks) but they need a whole lot more mods to deal with the weight -(look at the Icelandic trucks)

Jim

Jim
[/quote]

Ok , I can't resist JimJim .. was all that doublespeak ?? :D
 
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[quote author=Tyler link=board=2;threadid=8803;start=msg76055#msg76055 date=1071520127]
Ok , I can't resist JimJim .. was all that doublespeak ?? :D
[/quote]

Nope just what I said:

If you look at the Icelandic trucks - they can wheel in the snow.

If you look at the Icelandic trucks - they are heavily modified.

Here is a linked pic - not from my run, but one in the same conditions:
jackspass-59.jpg
http://www.broncoii4x4.com/jackspass/jackspass-59.jpg
 
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Yo bro :flipoff2:, the reason why the artic fag trucks do so well in the snow is cause of their big mofo tires. Float :doh:ation rules in the snow. The 80's weigh more than Junk's momma, but only by a few pounds. The pickups and other light junk can do ok in 2-3 feet of snow because they are lighter and won't sink to the bottom. Basically, you were bottoming out on the frame rails - you can't win that way. In packed down stuff etc you will rule, but there are times when the 80 is not perfect. Most of the time it is, but no all. :doh: :banana: :banana:
 
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I don't recall his name , but I believe a member of 80cool from Iceland stating on an Actic trucks type thread that the ideal snow truck would be a Suzuki samurai on floater tyres ... went on to state laughingly that if you ever did get stuck , why you'd simply have to kick out the passenger to lighten the load and give a 'lil push ...
 
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Lockers off in the snow. When you turn even slightly, then all 4 wheels are fighting each other (each wheel travels a different arc and therefore a different distance - locking them eliminates their ability to turn at diff speeds). Technique is everything on the snow. Getting a feel for when the wheels are starting to spin and instantly stopping, then popping it in reverse before the vehicle actually stops so you can use that slight lurch to initiate rearward movement and pack a carlength. Then go forward until the same thing happens.

Of course, airing down is absolutely essential in snow to achieve a bit of flotation. Deep trail snow is also a good way to lose or break your mudflaps, BTW. I remove them as they're getting really abused dragging along the sides of the tire trenches since they're wider. Trickery-wise, it's best to be the 2nd vehicle in a snowy trail run, BTW. The first truck is breaking trail but by the time the 3rd or 4th vehicle goes by the tire tracks are getting deeper and deeper.

DougM
 
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Sorry to hear this Tim..
The club I belong to as most others here as well, would have shared this info while you were up there. No secrets or a lack people wanting to help others. That's what makes a group or club so helpful when people first start out. Also for additions this is an area where a winch wins out again... sorry slider guys. :flipoff2:..... ;)
 

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