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kerosene in diesel

Discussion in 'Diesel Tech / 24 volts' started by beninborneo, Feb 25, 2007.

  1. beninborneo

    beninborneo

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    I was reading through some other posts and read about kerosene mixed into diesel. I read that this does not cause any problems.

    I live in Indonesia in the middle of no where and we have fuel brought in and sometimes it gets mixed with kerosene(kerosene is cheaper here) but I have noticed a decrease in power in my bj60 and also the generators we use act up when the fuel is mixed. So why would you want to mix the two? Can someone explain this please? Thanks
     
  2. nmbuckaroo

    nmbuckaroo

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    i don't know why in indonesia but back in the 1980's the deisel we got in texas would freeze or gel at about 20 deg. F. we would add about 1%-2% kerosene to prevent the gelling. i suppose the diesel we get now has additives already added because my diesel has not gelled in a few years and it gets 10-15 degrees a few times every winter.
     
  3. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

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    Kerosene thins it out. Probably not good for the injection pump to use in a hot location. But in the arctic, sure.....
     
  4. beninborneo

    beninborneo

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    so it helps in from freezing in cold temps but here it averages 36C everyday. So could it potentially thin the fuel too much. I don't think they mix in 1-2% either probably more like 15-20% there is a big price difference between the two and the will do whatever it costs to save a buck.

    Should i just add more pure diesel or is there another additive that would be better? I have seen a stp diesel additive sold here. If it clogs the injectors is there a way to clean them without pulling them apart?
     
  5. lshobie

    lshobie

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    I used Jet A-1 for years in my BJ60, ran fine. Only cost me 29 cents a litre - so it was a no brainer.
     
  6. roscoFJ73

    roscoFJ73

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    Shady dealers also add heating oil which is an impure of version of diesel but a lot cheaper.

    I don't think the injectors on these are meant to be cleaned as they have a Teflon coating on the nozzle and any attempt to clean will damage the coating and ruin the spray pattern.
    My advice is to find a reputable diesel supplier to save your fuel pump from wear
     
  7. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

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    Yah move ahead 20 yrs eh..... I pay 1.25 a litre now for Jet A1 and have had it as high as 1.50........

    And yes Jet a1 runs nice. Abeit, I think its dryer, so I put conditioner in it all the time in a diesel.
     
  8. brownbear

    brownbear Mod in Hibernation Moderator

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    Good idea to put some lubrication in there, like additive. It should say, "lubricates the injection..." on it. Add a bunch.

    Or add some vegetable oil in there. M john Galt on here might have some numbers to add for that.
     
  9. M John Galt

    M John Galt

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    2% to 5% veg oil provides all the lubrication required.
     
  10. xtremitys

    xtremitys

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    i have been reading up heaps lately on diesel technology/mechanics , etc as have a performance Diesel build coming up , i do remember reading something about this a few weeks ago in a big book called " Diesel tecnology " , as i remember its common to thin down to 50% diesel to 50% Kerosene for extreme cold , as diesel additives only work down to a certain temp like -5c , then the diesel gells . there are othe ways like using a diesel fuel heater , pretty much a Bio diesel inline heater that heats it to like 60- 80c . there would be other ways too , just have to have to go the library and read up .
     
  11. M John Galt

    M John Galt

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    Kerosene = #1 Diesel

    Kerosene, #1 winter grade Diesel, Arctic stove oil, and Jet-A, are all the same product, with slightly different additives for the specific use. The ULS Diesel fuel we burn all winter is kerosene plus lubricity additives. It's cloud point is temperature is -37°C.
     
  12. Dingo Chaser

    Dingo Chaser

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    would definitely not recommend it unless in the arctic or extreme cold. Definitely not for Indonesia. No wonder youre engine is having problems!!
     
  13. xtremitys

    xtremitys

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    Dingo chaser >>> maybe you need to chase your tail a few more times around in circles - lol its easy to make quick judgements about people when you know s*** yourself - nothiing personal , might pay to do a bit of investigation 1st , before you ridicule others .

    I have some very technical Diesel books that i borrowed from the library sitting at home ,that i am reading and they all say similar , one that i am reading now is called "Internal combustion Engine Fundamentals "its about 700 pages long , so go read that book & find out the truth for yourself .
     
  14. bigbrowndog

    bigbrowndog

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    Cheers Beni, I thought you blokes would be topping up with Palm Oil not Kero. I can remember the big Palm Oil Plantations in Borneo and Sumatra.I think your diesel comes from Singapore the same as ours in Northern Australia it may be added locally. cheers

    http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_SVO-palm.html
    http://dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/FAQ/diesel_fuel.htm
     
  15. beninborneo

    beninborneo

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    it is definitley added locally as the dealers are trying to water it down.

    So basically I should try and find a better supplier and until then add some sort of conditioner.

    The government is working on starting biofuel but with so much corruption here everything takes a long time. I read the other day that one fuel station in Jakarta now has bio fuel so hopefully they will make some more steps in that direction. I think some of the big oil companies are trying to stop the bio fuel as they think palm oil plantations will cause to much competion. That's what I have heard anyways.

    Thanks for all the help
     
  16. Technikev

    Technikev

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    Diesel fuel and heating oil (at least here in canada) are the same thing. My dad drives truck and for a number of years hauled fuel to filling stations and bush camps. He said they both came out of the same tank. The only difference is that the heating oil has purple dye added to it. So The Man can tell if you are using it in your truck. Heating oil is cheaper because there is no road tax applied to it.

    As M John Galt indicated, Kerosene, jet fuel and diesel are all very similar to one another. Up in the cold northern areas, kerosene and jet fuel is often used because it is readily available (lots of helicopters in the north) and it clouds at a lower temperature.

    Fuel additives work for temps well below -5C. Half the trucks in this area would not work if that were the case (its -10C now ). There's likely 50 000 diesel trucks in this city (pop. about 1 million) and most guys don't add anything other than whats in the fuel out of the punp. Edmonton isn't even that far north.

    -kevin
     
  17. roscoFJ73

    roscoFJ73

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    Heating oil here is less refined and not processed to the Australian Standards like diesel.
    It causes diesel engines to spew out more pollutants and lose power.
    Last service station here got caught after complaints from road train operators because they could feel the loss of power.
     
  18. beninborneo

    beninborneo

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    That's what I have noticed with my 60 more smoke and a lot less power. Also, the generators we have have been spewing smoke and the voltage goes all over the place or they won't start. You pull the fuel line of the injector and nothing comes out when you turn it over. Take it apart ,clean it and put it back in and then you have to do it all over again in just 2or3 days.

    So will the injectors in my 60 eventually clean themselves out when I start using better fuel or do I need to do something to clean them out?
     
  19. roscoFJ73

    roscoFJ73

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    Generators must have air leaks.Bad fuel wouldnt cause fuel to disappear from the injector line;)

    Good fuel certainly wont hurt your injectors. A long drive at high speed would probably burn any deposits off.
    It wont help if the nozzle on the injector is worn
     
  20. 100 TD

    100 TD

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    As noted previously, Jet A1 (kerosene) is used in diesel engines, 100% in the antarctic in the winter, no problems. I also recall all the tugs at the airport I used to work at would run straight jetA1 as the fuel tanks on planes had to be drained every so often, and the old fuel can not go back in the planes so was used in the diesel tugs. I have heard that kerosene is abrasive though, and may wear out your pump and injectors faster. I expect the problem you are having with the 4by and gensets is not to do with the kerosene but more to do with the other crap they are mixing with it.