How to use a tire plug kit? (1 Viewer)

re_guderian

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I'm looking for advice on a good plug kit to carry, and some info from those of you who've used them.

Are they suitable for repairing rock-induced flats, or more for nails/screws etc..?

How easy to use? Can a novice tire repairman like me get good results on the first time?

Recommendations on brands? I saw one link to a product while searching, but that was it.

I'm planning a trip to Toroweap Overlook on GC, and want to be prepared with more than just the spare.

Appreciate any input.
 

spressomon

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I carry one I bought from 4x4 Connection (don't remember the name though)...haven't had to use it yet thanks (touch'n wood now) to my MT/Rs. In addition to the plug kit, as you surely know, you have to have an air source...
 

rusty_tlc

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The kits are pretty straight forward to use, just follow the directions. I've only used the Monkey grip brand and that was years ago.
Like spressomon said you will need On Aoard Air to go with that kit.

If by "rock induced" you mean sidewall, they may kind of work. I've heard of people stuffing three or four into a small sidewall hole and making it off the trail.
 

re_guderian

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Got a compressor. Just with my FJ60, when I hit the boonies, I carried two spares. My MTR's are getting a little worn, and I like to be better safe than sorry... I know, I should just get new tires, but not this month :frown: . I have a good spare, just looking at ~150mi of dirt/rock road.
 
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Don't be intimidated because the plug kits are very easy to use. Just follow the instructions and you should be on your way rather quickly unless you incurr a large puncture or a nasty sidewall puncture. If the puncture is large, you can try two or three plugs in the "wound". I recently used my kit for the first time on a rock puncture between the tread and it was easy and straightforward. Don't forget to use the lube that comes with it...the lube makes it slide in so easy : ) Some plugs can be performed without removing the rim/tire from the axle, some not. Be sure to carry both a bottle neck jack and a hi-lift in order to get it up in all and any situations. You should also carry a couple of sharp razor blades for trimming the plug that remains outside the tread. I'm still driving on my plugged tire 5k later....it's all good so far. Any other tips/advice out there?
 

NorCalDoug

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The kits work great. Cruiserdrew was nice enough to lend me his kit to plug a puncture in one of my MTRs during last year's Death Valley trip.

I need to pick up a kit for myself and keep it in the rig.



no need to go with anything as fancy as this kit from Safety Seal, but it's a very nice kit -- a bit spendy...but nice.


DSC03500340.jpg
 

Brentbba

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Haven't used one yet, but like you, probably need to get one for saftey preparedness (boy scout in me!).

I did see Silvercruiser stuff 3-4 of them in a sidewall slice on Miller's. It was enough to get him to a safe flat area where he could put his spare on. The section of the trail he sliced the sidewall would have made for a very difficult change out with either his bottle jack or his hi-lift. Very effective use of a kit like this on his part!

FYI - there's another thread on these in Outfitting that a quick search will probably find with a link to what appears to be a good kit also.
 
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Ok, let me put on my ex tire changer hat.

First, plugs are more for punctures than tears because the rubber of the tire has to squeeze the plug a little.

Step 1, put some glue on the tool pictured on the right by Mr. Norcaldoug and insert that into the hole and twist it around some. repeat this a couple of times so that you get a small amount of glue into the hole, and you open up the hole "a little" (too much is no good)

Step 2, put a plug onto the plug inserter pictured on the left. put a little glue onto the plug. insert the plug so that about 1/2 inch is inside the tire. Slide tool out while leaving the plug in.

Hints- don't skimp on the quality of the tools, cheap ones will bend.
For bigger holes, use the plugs that have the patch combined with a plug.
 

re_guderian

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Steve C said:
Ok, let me put on my ex tire changer hat.

First, plugs are more for punctures than tears because the rubber of the tire has to squeeze the plug a little.

Step 1, put some glue on the tool pictured on the right by Mr. Norcaldoug and insert that into the hole and twist it around some. repeat this a couple of times so that you get a small amount of glue into the hole, and you open up the hole "a little" (too much is no good)

Step 2, put a plug onto the plug inserter pictured on the left. put a little glue onto the plug. insert the plug so that about 1/2 inch is inside the tire. Slide tool out while leaving the plug in.

Hints- don't skimp on the quality of the tools, cheap ones will bend.
For bigger holes, use the plugs that have the patch combined with a plug.

Thanks. That's what I'm looking for. Having never used one, or seen one done, I had no idea what's involved. Come to think of it, I've got an old BFG AT sitting outside the garage. I think I'll go practice. It seems to me to be one of those "when you need it, you really need it" type of things.
 

bkfj40

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I had to use it on two separate occasions on my old fj60. once when I was out in the middle of wyoming and I caught an old spike...

really straight forward, most recommend that you take it to a tire shop afterwards and get a patch put in, but I ran that plug in one tire for quite a few more miles before I finally got new tires...

well worth it

bk
 

lowenbrau

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I also agree with Doug.

That safety seal cord inserter with the collar is much easier to use, especially if you have a really big sidewall puncture.

I put a root through a sidewall in AK one time and needed about 6 plugs to stop it up. There was no time to let the glue set up though and as I drove the 4000km home the plugs would spit out about once a day. I'd quickly pull over, stuff a sharp stick that I whittled for the occasion in the leaking hole in order to save as much air as possible and then went to work stuffing plugs in. If you have that collar you can catch the end of the plugs as you push them in and then pull the thread back out. This allows you to get four cords in the hole at a time.
 

re_guderian

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bkfj40 said:
I had to use it on two separate occasions on my old fj60.

Phew. I thought you were going to say you'd plugged the MTR's on your old 80 a couple of times... ;)
 
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FYI, in the recent Sept. 2005 issue of Off-Road Adventures pp 72-79 (a magazine I get becuase of an order I placed with somone - but I am sure can be store bought) there is a great article on this very issue. how to use these kits, and fixing punctures and longer cuts withh a plug kit. good visuals and such. Plus, all kinds of reviews and how-to's on Google search.
 
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You can buy bulk boxes of plugs and large bottles of adhesive. You can also buy the tools seperately. I repaired a 3 inch slice that went straight across the tread by inserting a boat load of plugs side by side. Repair held up in a overloaded vehicle for the hour plus drive from a very remote location to the closest service station. Repairs made in this manner are strictly temporary and are not at all suitable for continued use.
 
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you also have to remember not to push the plug all the way inside the tire or you will loose the plug inside the tire...I had a buddy of mine when I was in highschool "help" me when I was plugging one of my tires. well after he pushed all but the last plug inside my tire I decided it was better to do it myself and I plugged it up. they are really simple to use.

I picked up a screw in one of my tires on the wife's ride (02 Durango 4x4) and the tire shop here in northern NY only plugged the tire. they charged 12 bucks for one plug. I was pissed so I went and bought another plug kit for the future..
 

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