How critical are these repairs? (2 Viewers)

Joined
Aug 30, 2020
Messages
47
Location
Atlanta
Hey guys -
I have a 2003 LX 470 with 258K miles I bought about 6 months ago. Truck runs great and looks new. I took it into a highly reputable service center to get oil change/tire rotation plus have them give her a look. Overall, they said it was a really clean truck but noted the following. I have no idea how critical these are to do so need some help. They gave me a list based on their view of what is urgent plus price - for context i am in Atlanta.

Heater T's - $214
Battery - $209 (failed to meet min.level)
Rear Main Seal (moderate leak) $1621
Leaking Power Steering Rack - $1781 (What if I just changed the fluid?)
Differential & Transfer Case 0- $390
Door Lock Actuators - $1718 (dumb)

They note that power steering fluid and transmission fluid is due to be changed - but no idea if just changing the fluid is easy enough and worth doing alone.

Anyway, any help overall would be much appreciated!
 

js47

SILVER Star
Joined
Sep 18, 2018
Messages
183
Location
New York, New York
Heater T's - $214
Very easy and very cheap to do yourself. Also, very important.

Leaking Power Steering Rack - $1781 (What if I just changed the fluid?)
Flush the fluid (takes ATF) and add some AT-205 and check back after a few thousand miles. Very easy and very cheap.

Differential & Transfer Case 0- $390
Cheap and easy to do yourself.
 

94SRUNNER

GOLD Star
Joined
Oct 9, 2006
Messages
3,857
Location
Dayton, OH
Hey guys -
I have a 2003 LX 470 with 258K miles I bought about 6 months ago. Truck runs great and looks new. I took it into a highly reputable service center to get oil change/tire rotation plus have them give her a look. Overall, they said it was a really clean truck but noted the following. I have no idea how critical these are to do so need some help. They gave me a list based on their view of what is urgent plus price - for context i am in Atlanta.

Heater T's - $214
Battery - $209 (failed to meet min.level)
Rear Main Seal (moderate leak) $1621
Leaking Power Steering Rack - $1781 (What if I just changed the fluid?)
Differential & Transfer Case 0- $390
Door Lock Actuators - $1718 (dumb)

They note that power steering fluid and transmission fluid is due to be changed - but no idea if just changing the fluid is easy enough and worth doing alone.

Anyway, any help overall would be much appreciated!

Don't go with them. Research on the forum here and do it yourself:
Heater T's are critical. Do them yourself. They are less than $25 in parts.
Battery you can easily do yourself.
I would question the rear main seal and suspect it may be a different leak.
Try a flush and stop leak for the PS rack.
What is the "Differential & Transfer Case 0"
Door lock actuators could be done yourself.
 

Zjohnsonua

SILVER Star
Joined
Feb 1, 2018
Messages
1,208
Location
Huntsville, Alabama
The UZ is not known for main seal leaks. It is, however, somewhat notorious for valve cover leaks - especially at your mileage. Valve cover gaskets and spark plug tube seals are due and they aren't very expensive to do. This definitely a DIY job if you have the desire and the time.

The rest of the stuff has already been addressed. Do not put off those heater tees.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2020
Messages
47
Location
Atlanta
Thanks, guys. What a forum. I am not a DIY guy - not against it and with YouTube it is easier but I don't have a ton of tools that are car specific - maybe I should get some? This is a family truck that my wife also drives with kids so I am paying for peace of mind as much as anything. I would hate to DIY them and then have her overheat somewhere. For the more expensive stuff, the stop leak, etc. seems to make good sense.

I bought the truck after living in NYC for a decade - I have not owned a car in a long time. Seems the guys these days just do what the computer tells them....
 

94SRUNNER

GOLD Star
Joined
Oct 9, 2006
Messages
3,857
Location
Dayton, OH
Thanks, guys. What a forum. I am not a DIY guy - not against it and with YouTube it is easier but I don't have a ton of tools that are car specific - maybe I should get some? This is a family truck that my wife also drives with kids so I am paying for peace of mind as much as anything. I would hate to DIY them and then have her overheat somewhere. For the more expensive stuff, the stop leak, etc. seems to make good sense.

I bought the truck after living in NYC for a decade - I have not owned a car in a long time. Seems the guys these days just do what the computer tells them....

Lots of great knowledge here on the forum. Good YouTube how-to videos as well.

You could also post in the clubhouse forum associated with the region where you live. Most Land Cruiser owners are happy to lend a hand.
 

AlpineAccess

Overlanding is an expensive word for car camping.
Joined
Apr 16, 2019
Messages
1,620
Location
Colorado
Thanks, guys. What a forum. I am not a DIY guy - not against it and with YouTube it is easier but I don't have a ton of tools that are car specific - maybe I should get some? This is a family truck that my wife also drives with kids so I am paying for peace of mind as much as anything. I would hate to DIY them and then have her overheat somewhere. For the more expensive stuff, the stop leak, etc. seems to make good sense.

I bought the truck after living in NYC for a decade - I have not owned a car in a long time. Seems the guys these days just do what the computer tells them....

You've gotten good advice on the repairs already. More good news is that on a 100 you only need basic tools to get started, and then to accumulate other odds and ends as you get more comfortable (buy as needed for the job). If you're starting from scratch on tools this will get you most of the way there for a 100 series (and most other cars too):

First Purchase: something like this: Cresent 170 Piece Tool Set with Case

I have had the older version of this same kit (at least same component parts) since 2004. I'm not saying its the best, just what I've had and I feel it was a "lucky buy" as outside of the clasps to hold the case shut breaking, it has been almost everything needed and nothing more. When your tool set at home starts building out, throw this guy in the cruiser because it isn't so excessive that it takes up a ton of space.

Second group of purchases: 6 ton jack stands and a good quality 3+ ton floor jack and a 22mm deep well socket. You can service much of the vehicle without putting it in the air but you'll need a jack for suspension work, tire/wheel rotation, wheel bearing service, etc.

Third group of purchases: 30mm deep well socket and 54mm deep well socket (30 for torsion bar adjustment/54 for wheel bearing service)

You'll be most of the way to fixing MOST things with that list. You will eventually get the addiction and need snap ring pliers, a fish scale, a dead blow hammer, plastic mallet, brass drift, 22mm ratcheting wrench, etc. but those are specific to the job you're doing. Plenty of good tutorials here for the main maintenance and repair items - most of us including myself are ape brains anyways which is why we rate the difficulty of a job by how many bananas (difficulty level) we think it is. "Wheel bearing service is a 1.5 banana job", for example.

All in probably around $500-1000 for everything you need, depending where and how much of that stuff you buy. You will save 5-10x that amount plus you'll learn a lot about yourself (like what your default "wrenching" curse word is).

UPDATE: Almost forgot the following:

1. Digital Multimeter. Even the $20-30 ones these days are solid for people that don't use them every day for work.
2. Telescoping Magnet. For when you drop a bolt or just can't reach something. Use mine all the time because I'm clumsy and/or working too fast.
3. *Adding after it was recommended* an OB2 scanner or bluetooth transmitter.
 
Last edited:

MJK

SILVER Star
Joined
Mar 13, 2020
Messages
518
Location
Arizona
I'm with @AlpineAccess

DIY it. Most of us do, and we all had to start sometime too. It isn't rocket science and there is lots of support here if you get stuck. Start with Tees, Fluids and a battery. You'll build some confidence, tick some items off the list and your savings will more than pay for the tools required to do them. If you are looking for info Google "replacing heater tees site:ih8mud.com <100 series>" as an example.

Battery - $100 at Costco and 5 mins in the parking lot with a (10mm?) wrench
Heater T's - $20 in tees and a gallon of coolant, plus half an hour at home. Tools required: a pair of pliers and a funnel.
Differential & Transfer Case - a 3/8 metric drive socket set, a couple crush washers, a hex socket, 7 qts of 75w-90 Mobile 1 LS, and pump or syringe.
Rear Main Seal (moderate leak) - Probably valve cover gaskets, as mentioned. You might be able to just snug them up.
Leaking Power Steering Rack - fluid change as mentioned above is a good start with additive.

So, what is that $5-600 including tools + part of a Saturday for everything other than door lock actuators?
 
Last edited:

saucebox

Slobivius Americanus
Joined
Jan 24, 2009
Messages
2,204
Location
SLC, UT
There's also the 'Clubhouse' at the top with local groups. Lots of really good folks in the Atlanta area—for some of the more intimidating projects, you can often find someone to help you look at it in person.

ACC is also a really great shop there in the ATL area—when a job gets too big, take it to a shop that knows what they're doing.
 

gregnash

Anal Retentive Analyst
SILVER Star
Joined
Nov 3, 2011
Messages
12,224
Location
Carson City, NV
$214 for heater tees sounds astronomical. I think they're like $9 a piece from Toyota and aren't too hard to replace.
Shop labor at most places is anywhere north of $125/hr. So if they figure cost of the part, plus their standard price increase then the shop labor and everything. That is a general quote for that stuff.
When I did my heater t's with basic tools and replacing everything it took me about three hours. So if they are just replacing the T's (most likely) and not the hoses then that would cut the time pretty short for the change out.

A lot of that stuff I believe is pretty easily done on your own. You can always take to another shop to get a price quote but that is getting into the range of "I really don't want to do these jobs" type prices.

Note that the steering rack is a bear to do from what everyone states on here, when done properly. So that may not be all the off.
 

Tanner H

SILVER Star
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
649
Location
Corona, CA
Tons of good info in here already.

The door lock actuators are expensive from the dealership, but the trick is to just replace the cheap motor inside the actuator. below is a link to a set of motors for all four doors and a second link that shows how to replace them. boom bam.

Heres a link to a set of motors so there is no guess work. These are plug n' play.



 

ramangain

Clarksonian disciple
SILVER Star
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
2,544
Location
Atlantis
Do all of your power door locks work? If so, leave them alone until they fail.

Clean around leak areas and monitor. Do the heater Ts yourself, as well as dump the power steering gunk into the power steering fluid to try and stem/stop the leak for now. Get a new battery and install it yourself, if you feel compelled.

If all of this sounds familiar, it is because you'll receive the same advice over and over again on here. Many, many folks have marched down this road before and are kind enough to share advice/experience in this forum. Welcome!
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2013
Messages
2,272
Location
St. Louis, MO
Sorry if this is a repeated answer:

SLEE did my Steering rack and my truck went from driving like a dodge to a BMW. All Tight and great. I hope you are taking your 100 to ACC
 
Joined
Dec 23, 2015
Messages
157
Location
Los Angeles, California
You've gotten good advice on the repairs already. More good news is that on a 100 you only need basic tools to get started, and then to accumulate other odds and ends as you get more comfortable (buy as needed for the job). If you're starting from scratch on tools this will get you most of the way there for a 100 series (and most other cars too):

First Purchase: something like this: Cresent 170 Piece Tool Set with Case

I have had the older version of this same kit (at least same component parts) since 2004. I'm not saying its the best, just what I've had and I feel it was a "lucky buy" as outside of the clasps to hold the case shut breaking, it has been almost everything needed and nothing more. When your tool set at home starts building out, throw this guy in the cruiser because it isn't so excessive that it takes up a ton of space.

Second group of purchases: 6 ton jack stands and a good quality 3+ ton floor jack and a 22mm deep well socket. You can service much of the vehicle without putting it in the air but you'll need a jack for suspension work, tire/wheel rotation, wheel bearing service, etc.

Third group of purchases: 30mm deep well socket and 57mm deep well socket (30 for torsion bar adjustment/57 for wheel bearing service)

You'll be most of the way to fixing MOST things with that list. You will eventually get the addiction and need snap ring pliers, a fish scale, a dead blow hammer, plastic mallet, brass drift, 22mm ratcheting wrench, etc. but those are specific to the job you're doing. Plenty of good tutorials here for the main maintenance and repair items - most of us including myself are ape brains anyways which is why we rate the difficulty of a job by how many bananas (difficulty level) we think it is. "Wheel bearing service is a 1.5 banana job", for example.

All in probably around $500-1000 for everything you need, depending where and how much of that stuff you buy. You will save 5-10x that amount plus you'll learn a lot about yourself (like what your default "wrenching" curse word is).

UPDATE: Almost forgot the following:

1. Digital Multimeter. Even the $20-30 ones these days are solid for people that don't use them every day for work.
2. Telescoping Magnet. For when you drop a bolt or just can't reach something. Use mine all the time because I'm clumsy and/or working too fast.

Super helpful!!!
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2012
Messages
228
You've gotten good advice on the repairs already. More good news is that on a 100 you only need basic tools to get started, and then to accumulate other odds and ends as you get more comfortable (buy as needed for the job). If you're starting from scratch on tools this will get you most of the way there for a 100 series (and most other cars too):

First Purchase: something like this: Cresent 170 Piece Tool Set with Case

I have had the older version of this same kit (at least same component parts) since 2004. I'm not saying its the best, just what I've had and I feel it was a "lucky buy" as outside of the clasps to hold the case shut breaking, it has been almost everything needed and nothing more. When your tool set at home starts building out, throw this guy in the cruiser because it isn't so excessive that it takes up a ton of space.

Second group of purchases: 6 ton jack stands and a good quality 3+ ton floor jack and a 22mm deep well socket. You can service much of the vehicle without putting it in the air but you'll need a jack for suspension work, tire/wheel rotation, wheel bearing service, etc.

Third group of purchases: 30mm deep well socket and 57mm deep well socket (30 for torsion bar adjustment/57 for wheel bearing service)

You'll be most of the way to fixing MOST things with that list. You will eventually get the addiction and need snap ring pliers, a fish scale, a dead blow hammer, plastic mallet, brass drift, 22mm ratcheting wrench, etc. but those are specific to the job you're doing. Plenty of good tutorials here for the main maintenance and repair items - most of us including myself are ape brains anyways which is why we rate the difficulty of a job by how many bananas (difficulty level) we think it is. "Wheel bearing service is a 1.5 banana job", for example.

All in probably around $500-1000 for everything you need, depending where and how much of that stuff you buy. You will save 5-10x that amount plus you'll learn a lot about yourself (like what your default "wrenching" curse word is).

UPDATE: Almost forgot the following:

1. Digital Multimeter. Even the $20-30 ones these days are solid for people that don't use them every day for work.
2. Telescoping Magnet. For when you drop a bolt or just can't reach something. Use mine all the time because I'm clumsy and/or working too fast.
Please add:
OBD2 scanner
You can get a cheap wired one, or wireless with phone app for about $30.

Also you can borrow tools from O’Reilly’s, autozone, Napa as needed. I always print out parts I need from McGeorge Toyota and take it to my local dealer (they match prices). I recommend keeping a spare coil in the truck. Mine started to fail around 250k. (Denso $50 from rockauto - truck misfires and OBD2 will tell you which coil is bad).
- Kevin.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom