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Home Improvement Question - Cabinets

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by willmaxr, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. willmaxr

    willmaxr

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    Wondering if anyone has had their cabinets "refaced"? We are trying to update our kitchen on a budget - new floor, counter, etc to prep for living in now and eventual sale. The cabinets we've got a super solid 1957 originals. Don't want to spring for full replacement of kitchen and thought this might be a way to go.
    Anyone? Thanks.
     
  2. archie

    archie

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    I am coming from a background that has made cabinets and torn out old ones so it really has nothing to do with refacing but at least I will share you my experience.
    I assume your cabinets are solid wood and have no major defects such as rot, rat holes and stains and the only reason you are changing the look of the cabinets is because it doesn't thave to look you are looking for in regards to style, color and finish. Have you thought about refinishing , restaining or painting the cabinets? I am concerned that if you resurface the cabinets might you end up with a laminate on that might peel or chip off easily. If you painted and it chipped off you can always retouch it. The finacial investment is much lower if painted or restained but it will take some work. The way I see it is if the cabinet wood is worth keeping for the quality it would be easier to remove the paint later than a laminate glued on to the surface. Why cover up good solid wood with a veener?
    The only advantage you got with changing the cabinets is you can change the layout of the kitchen but that usually goes with updating the electrical outlets and the floors,etc........
    I was wondering what main reason for changing the look of the cabinets?Outdated style, color,etc...
     
  3. Scamper

    Scamper

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    When I bought my house about 18 years ago, the cabinets were refaced. I didn't notice it when we looked at the house (and it wouldn't have mattered anyway), but it was a crappy job. You could see that they simply removed the doors from the old cabinets, then faced over the entire thing with new facing and doors. You could still see the old facing inside when you opend the door though.

    I don't know if that's how they all do it, but if I planned to live in the house for a while, I'd not do it. If you're just sprucing up to sell, and it makes a big visual difference, then go for it. The risk you take is that the buyer may not like it if they notice.
     
  4. phishtaco

    phishtaco Cincinnati

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    Well as the resident ih8mud kitchen designer this is my .02....
    -A lot of time "refacing" is the same or more expensive than buying new cabinets. If you are handy hang them yourself.
    -I would not pay anyone to reface them. If they are in good condition, paint them and add new hardware.
    -Take some measurements of your kitchen and goto Home depot/lowes let them throw it up on there gay computer software and price it out. They have many different price points.

    Counter Tops.
    How handy are you? I poured my own concrete tops in a weekend for about $100 which usually cost about $100 per sq. ft.

    Update your appliances with decent looking stuff.
     
  5. willmaxr

    willmaxr

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    thanks for the replies. that was really the info i was looking for. i guess i wanted my suspicions about the durability of the refacing confirmed. they are good solid wood cabinets. and it is just the look that needs updating. stripping and refinishing them sounds like the way to go. :cheers:
     
  6. phishtaco

    phishtaco Cincinnati

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    refacing will most likely delaminate or turn colors especially aroung a heat source(range)
     
  7. mabrodis

    mabrodis

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    Hey, can you elaborate on this, what type of concrete do you buy, do you pour it right on the actual countertop? Do you stamp it to create a pattern or anything? That sounds really cool, and the advantage of pouring it is you can have wild shapes and huge dimensions, since you aren't limited to like a slab of granite or something for size.

    So, details please.. :D
     
  8. phishtaco

    phishtaco Cincinnati

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    Heres a good refernce book for like $25. There also places online
    http://www.concreteexchange.com/index.jsp

    Anyway I did mine 5 or 6 years ago before some of these ideas and books came out. I formed mine right on top of the cabinets, some people form thiers and carry them in after being cured. I used Quickcrete 5000 for mine and that is usually recommended. First I laid 3/4" Plywood on the cabinet boxes and left about a 1/2" overhang. Then I took some 1x material and formed up the edges so that the top would appear to be 1.5" to 2" thick. Next I put some chicken wire. I also put duct tape on the edge forms and then rubbed them with crisco so that the forms would release from the concrete. Mix concrete, pour it, float it out to smooth, let it cure for a few days, pull off forms and seal it. Not to hard
     
  9. archie

    archie

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    I saw an article in Fine Homebuilding magazine (maybe able to find in library)a few years back about doing concrete countertops and considered doing some custom fabrication on an outdoor space. The only thing I remember is that you have to use a sander or vibrator on the form you are making the tops to eliminate bubbles on the finished surface.
     
  10. phishtaco

    phishtaco Cincinnati

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    I took an orbital sander and vibrated it down by running it down the face of the edge form. It has worked well for me.
     
  11. semlin

    semlin discouraged user

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    You might consider getting new cabinet doors made. I have made shaker style wood doors a couple of times and many cabinet places will do that alone. With new countertops, it generally looks pretty good in an old style kitchen.