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Help solve FJ60 doors that freeze up!

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by Hojack, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. Hojack

    Hojack

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    Have had issues with my doors freezing up in my FJ60 taking it to the mountain since I've owned it. Most times another door will work depending on which side the wind is blowing from. Sometimes it's so bad I need to go in from the rear tailgate. I can push from the inside and they open. Is my door seals going out or is this just a design flaw??? Has anybody else had this and found a fix.

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    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
  2. Willard

    Willard SILVER Star

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    Um....both my 2007 F150 and my 2004 Yukon do this.
    We had freezing rain the other day and I had to pull so hard on the rear door of the 150 that the weatherstripping came off the channel.
    When in Quebec this Christmas with the crazy snow they received was able to open the driver's door but almost had to kick the passenger door open from the inside.
    Went to the store and they were frozen agan.

    Design flaw maybe, maybe not.
     
  3. Hojack

    Hojack

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    I was wondering if there is a product that would prevent the weather stripping around door not to bond with the door frame???
     
  4. NMC_EXP

    NMC_EXP

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    Give the weatherstrip a heavy dose of armor-all or similar product that contains silicone. Main thing about silicone is that things do not stick to it. Might help to wax the door frame that contacts the rubber. Have to reapply it periodically.

    If the weatherstrip is chewed up/chunked out the armor all may not help much as the ice can mechanically "key" into the low spots in the rubber.

    Armor-all etc works on garage door bottom seal freezing to the floor.

    Bad thing about anything containing silicone is that it is killer of paint adhesion. There are no solvents for silicone so you really have to work to get it off.
     
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  5. NMC_EXP

    NMC_EXP

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    Another thing - around here there is enough sun to partially melt the snow on a vehicle. Meltwater flows down into the door joints. After sundown it freezes up.

    Because of this I brush the snow off the roof and doors in the morning. Saves a lot of grief.
     
  6. Hojack

    Hojack

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    :poop:
    Tough part is going up to the mountain with wet road spray and then transitions to cold and snow. By the end of the day when I get back to cruiser it's frozen up tighter than a :poop: brick house!
     
  7. mwebfj60

    mwebfj60 SILVER Star

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    X2 on what NMC said, that and I used to keep a microfiber towel in the center console and would wipe the moisture and condensation off the door jam and weatherstripping when getting out if I was going to be parked overnight or for a few hours. Thanks for the visual of having to climb through the rear hatch...good stuff.
     
  8. Bear

    Bear SILVER Star

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    Heard that wiping WD-40 on the rubber seals keeps them from sticking.
    Why not test it on just one door until you're satisfied?
     
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  9. Hojack

    Hojack

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    Sounds like an idea. The stuff works wonders
     
  10. NMC_EXP

    NMC_EXP

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    I had a career in the rubber business. There are several types of rubber and these are divided into oil resistant and non-oil resistant types. Chances are the rubber used for weatherstrip, windshield gaskets and any other rubber part which is exposed to the sunlight is non-oil resistant. Prime example is EPDM rubber which is best for this application because UV light does not hurt it.

    If so using WD-40 or any other petroleum based fluid on it will degrade the rubber. Usually by softening the rubber even to the point it will become sticky.

    Drop a non-oil resistant (EPDM or natural rubber) o-ring in a container of gasoline, diesel....etc. Check it a month later and the o-ring will have turned into a chunk of black goo.
     
  11. Hojack

    Hojack

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    That is some helpful information. So what's the fix?
     
  12. NMC_EXP

    NMC_EXP

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    Armor-all or other silicone based fluid on the seals, like I mentioned earlier. Maybe wax or armor-all on the door surround that mates with the gasket. That plus keep the water out of the door joints.
     
  13. 89GASHOG

    89GASHOG

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    Vegetable oil sprays are said to work well too, along with silicone. I always seem to forget to do this. It can be a big problem here, because the typical weather is really wet and then if it freezes the doors are totally seized up.
     
  14. Bear

    Bear SILVER Star

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    Hojack,

    There are a large number of "rubber" pieces on a vehicle from gaskets, to hoses, to weatherstrips, to seals. The very nature of their environment exposes them to various oils, greases, and solvents as well as heat and cold temperatures and of course UV and environmental pollutants.

    Not knowing which compound or formulation is definitely used for each on a specific vehicle, and even the variances from manufacturer to manufacturer, was why I suggested testing a product--a large area if you feel confident or just a small inconspicuous patch if you're doubtful. As for your specific door-weatherstrips, their manufacturer would be the final arbiter as to their performance characteristics and reactions to various compounds and exposures. Many door-weatherstrips are predominantly sandwiched between metal components and rarely exposed to much UV or environmental pollutants, as would say a front windshield-glass gasket. WD-40 was originally designed to displace water and might have a valid application for snow and melting and re-freezing ice. I will give it a shot this winter and report back.

    And as always YRMV.
     
  15. hj 60

    hj 60 JT1W0HJ6000960839

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    rubber spray is made for winter freezing.
    this is a link in dutch bol.com | Holts rubber spray
    And I can only find rubber coating in ebay, somehow it must have another name in english, but for me rubber spray in a can protects the door seals and is made against winter freezing.
    Can I export a few million cans to the usa? :banana:
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
  16. NMC_EXP

    NMC_EXP

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    I agree with all your comments.

    My reluctance with WD-40 is based on:

    (1) I am assuming WD-40 contains petrochemicals but I have not pulled its MSDS to verify thet.

    (2) If I selected a material type for door weatherstrip it would be EPDM. Even though it has little direct exposure to sunlight/UV it also has excellent high temperature resistance. Better than nitrile/Buna-N the low cost oil resistant rubber. Compared to solid molded rubber, foam rubber is structurally weak from the git-go. To me EPDM would be more durable over the long haul. Having said all that, I never had engineering responsibility for foam rubber components so I may be over thinking this.

    (3) Testing a localized area is a good idea. I'm just not sure how well it will predict long term effects. Standard fluid compatibility testing involves immersing test specimens in the test fluid at a certain temperature and time, then measuring the volume change, and the changes in tensile strength and elongation. Changes range from subtle to the sample dissolving into a gob of black snot.

    My first Toyota was a '79 FJ40 that I bought new. Owned it until 2016. I was impressed by the quality and long term durability of all of the rubber components on that vehicle. Compared to Toyota the tubing, hoses, gaskets etc on American vehicles were junk.
     
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  17. Hojack

    Hojack

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    The easiest solution may to use car wax in door frame. No harsh chemicals to deteriorate the weatherstripping or paint. It's just frustrating getting to the cruiser and almost pulling the door off or breaking the door latch.
     
  18. TanTLC

    TanTLC

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    Vasaline works. I"ve been using it for years. wipe some on at the beginning of winter, then just wipe it off in the spring so as not to attract dust/dirt.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
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  19. hj 60

    hj 60 JT1W0HJ6000960839

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    The english name is rubber and nylon lubricant
    Does not stick to clothes and we also have a Subaru (window glass to rubber seal) where this works.
    on ebay plenty of it:

    rubber and nylon lubricant | eBay
     
  20. Spike Strip

    Spike Strip Stable Genius. SILVER Star

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    I've never experienced this, living in Southern California, but I've read that any of the oil/wax sprays like Pam work well, and obviously have no petroleum products.