Front wheel bearings question - really could use some help/advice

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Good afternoon
In the process of replacing my front brakes/rotors. During disassembly, I noticed this groove on the outer bearing 'retaining ring'. I assume this is not normal and just wondering what this indicative of? One more thing...I think I boogered up one of the hub flange bolts a bit, as I can only thread it back on just until about the nut is flush with the head of the bolt. In looking at it, it doesn't look too bad, but I certainly dont want to make it any worse. Is there an 'easy' way to clean up and/or recut the thread on that bolt? Thanks in advance for any/all help.

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JunkCrzr89

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In the bottom picture showing the deep groove, that’s from the wheel bearings not being torqued to the proper preload and therefore being loose. Just flip it over and place the good side (non-grooved side) towards the wheel bearing OR buy a new one (they’re cheap).

I think I boogered up one of the hub flange bolts a bit, as I can only thread it back on just until about the nut is flush with the head of the bolt.
Run the proper threaded die over the stud to clean up the threads, and run the proper threaded tap through the nut to clean up those threads. OR just replace the stud and nut (they’re also cheap).
 
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My local Toyota does not have the studs in stock so looks like I'll clean up the threads as I'd like to button this up tomorrow. I don't have a tap and die set, I assume this one will do the trick?
Any idea what size the stud is?
 

JunkCrzr89

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My local Toyota does not have the studs in stock so looks like I'll clean up the threads as I'd like to button this up tomorrow. I don't have a tap and die set, I assume this one will do the trick?
Any idea what size the stud is?
Yes that will work. Put motor oil on the threads before using the tap or die. I don’t remember the size, maybe M8 x 1.25.
 
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O'Reilly's rent (free) a thread chase kit. Which works better than a tap & die, as less chance of cutting threads.
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I just messed up a flange stud trying to break the cone washers free. I checked the threads before replacing it. I didn’t record it, but I believe @JunkCrzr89 is correct and the threads are M8x1.25
 
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Using what? Brass punch is the ticket.
Brass hammer. I didn’t have the nut flush enough with the end of the stud. This allowed the nut to push and fold a few threads over. I couldn’t get them corrected with a file and my tap and die set didn’t have this pitch. Seems to be the way it goes, wait three days for a $2 part to come in to the dealer.
 
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I used a brass hammer also, I threaded the nut on the stud until it was flush and then banged away...for whatever reason, I think that's how I screwed up one of the threads. When I did the other side, I placed the brass hammer on the stud and hit the hammer with a normal hammer...took a few more hits, but I knew there would be no risk of hosing the threads. FWIW....both the adjuster and lock nuts weren't even finger tight on both sides! I guess that certainly explains the groove I showed in my first post. Nice to know that I have it done correctly now.
 
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So now you've a few days to recondition wheel hubs.

For your next wheel bearing service. Remove nut from stud, pound on naked stud with brass dowel (brass hammers tend to be a harder brass (forged))

When I replace hub flanges studs. I use medium thread locker (blue) and torque to 14ft-lbf. The blue will lock & seal threads, keeping water out. I also use a little blue during assemble, on threads of stud for the nut. Torquing nut to 24ft-lbf. Tick is to not use to much blue or it will presses into flat washer and cone washer. Making next service more difficult to pop out cone washers.

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This was the worst set of cone washers, I ever pounded off. As it turned out. Hub flange and cone washers, were glued on/in. The video is only last few minutes of pounding.



Today I use air hammer with brass tip. So easy and fast.



Tip: Very important: Bearings and races are matched (seated together), do not mix up wheel bearings from one wheel hub to the other.
 
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suprarx7nut

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Brass hammer. I didn’t have the nut flush enough with the end of the stud. This allowed the nut to push and fold a few threads over. I couldn’t get them corrected with a file and my tap and die set didn’t have this pitch. Seems to be the way it goes, wait three days for a $2 part to come in to the dealer.

I used a brass hammer also, I threaded the nut on the stud until it was flush and then banged away...for whatever reason, I think that's how I screwed up one of the threads. When I did the other side, I placed the brass hammer on the stud and hit the hammer with a normal hammer...took a few more hits, but I knew there would be no risk of hosing the threads. FWIW....both the adjuster and lock nuts weren't even finger tight on both sides! I guess that certainly explains the groove I showed in my first post. Nice to know that I have it done correctly now.
I've done a lot of 100 wheel services where I had to take off those cone washers. Rarely am I able to get those free without some serious hammering with a brass punch.... or a very careful air chisel. That one task has kept me from opening up a hub more than once. Such a pain. Some guys have that process figured out. I am not one of them.

Those darn cone washers...
 

tip

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Today I use air hammer with brass tip. So easy and fast.

I second the air hammer method. Super quick and very satisfying.

And most importantly much less chance of damaging the threads (or your knuckles 😂)
 
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I second the air hammer method. Super quick and very satisfying.

And most importantly much less chance of damaging the threads (or your knuckles 😂)
It is! But more so for the pro. DIY, often do not have shop-air or air-hammer. The FSM brass dowel (cheap) method, works very well for DIY..
 

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