Frame after sandblast...what do you think?

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Joined
Dec 17, 2009
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22
Messages
49
Location
MN
Just got my frame back from sandblasting. The guy said it in great shape (and much heavier/stronger than most frames he sees). There is only one area that he pointed out, the area under the bib/cross member. He has a buddy that had done a few FJ's and the guy pointed out the weak area but after looking at mine said its no big deal.
You guys that have done frame off's, would you attempt to do something here, or just coat everything up good and call it a day???

And, yes...I will create my build thread soon.
Thanks

frame3.jpg
frame4.jpg
 
If it's any consolation, when someone does a saginaw conversion most of the metal on the back side, where that hole is, gets cut out.
the back is much thinner than the front. Literally thousands of 40's have saginaw conversions and only the hacked up ones need much followup attention. If it concerns you do a a little gusset work. When you get the front bumper make sure you buy stronger than stock, 1/4" or better.
The front channel will do as much as far as holding the frame together as the cross member does
 
I agree with lcwizard but would like to add a couple of thoughts. You might want to consider what areas of the frame show after reassembly and weld in some new metal as much for appearance as strength. The other thing that caught my eye is even a good sandblaster cannot get all the rust , especially inside the frame so now might be a good time to use something like POR 15 in areas that still show some rust.
 
Do something to fix it now, NEVER be an easier time. It is accessible and clean for welding.
 
Hi Aussie 42
I was at chassis stage 15 months ago.
First you need to repair the frame. Lots of threads on this site covering chassis repairs.
Mudder micdon comes to mind with a thread on chassis repairs.
Chassis painting.
Lots of options here this is what I did.
The chassis was taken to an industrial paint shop. (Brisbane )
These guys paint bridges, shopping centre metal work, marine metal work etc.
For a finish that would last 20 plus years this is was there process.
1 Zinc coated.
2 Etched prime
3 Polyurethane x 3 coats gloss.
4 Sealer coat.
I'm told by the painter that this process of painting can be repaired or touched up if needed . Other types of chassis coating eg powder coating can not be repaired.
Process time was 10 days.
Cost $2,700.00 AUD
Overall very happy with the job.
A photo for you.
Cheers
ImageUploadedByIH8MUD Forum1423264360.351461.jpg




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given where I live, I'm a little anal about rust ... while its in pieces do it once, and do it right which usually means more time/money ...
 
No dog in this fight, what so ever, but how exactly would you patch that? Would you remove the whole brace, weld in metal or try to weld something in as it sits. If you were going for looks, lets say. I'm thinking it would be pretty hard to weld anything in there and have it look good.

Just for conversation!
 
Bambi Girl that's exactly what I did with my frame. I was set on powder coat, but I was given strong advice otherwise for repair purposes.

ImageUploadedByIH8MUD Forum1423326379.925399.jpg
 
Thanks everyone,
Actually, after looking at it, where the rust is there is really no structural support (the "C" channel goes top/bottom/front), the rust is on the thinner piece of the box for the radiator support brackets. Looking at the front, there are half circles cut out next to the frame channels and looks to be kind of a oops that they left the thinner piece go all the way to the inside of the frame and causing a catch point for that down slope part of the frame.
I think I am planning on trying to match the half circle cutout that is in the front and finish it off.
What do you think?
 
No dog in this fight, what so ever, but how exactly would you patch that? Would you remove the whole brace, weld in metal or try to weld something in as it sits. If you were going for looks, lets say. I'm thinking it would be pretty hard to weld anything in there and have it look good.

Just for conversation!


you can do some pretty clean work with a CAD program and cnc cuttings
 
Hi
Now you have decide on doing a repair the question is how to do the repair.
This is one of many options.
If you have a well equipped work shop I would remove the cross bar by grinding the the head off the rivets and with a good punch and hammer remove the rivets.
With the cross bar removed a patch can be fabricated and welded in place.

Be sure brace the chassis rails and take measurements before you start.

When replacing the cross bar I would fabricate a set of rivet setting tools then spin up a set of rivets in the Lathe and reset the cross bar back in place using rivets rather using bolts and nuts.
A riveted joint for this application is far superior than a nut and bolt joint in my opinion.
Take your time, think out your steps and you will be rewarded with a job that looks professional , original and will last for many years.
What part of Australia are you from?
Enjoy have fun and good luck.
Cheers


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Being the Bubba, that I am, I'd cut out the cross brace, repair the rust and weld back in. I wish I had CNC capability or even a lathe to make rivets. Sure would be a great time to add power steering.

I guess a guy could bend up his own cross brace and reinstall. What ever you decide to do, it will be better than now.

Some good ideas posted!
 

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