Food for field work

GeoRoss

 
 
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I am getting ready for my summer field season in Tibet and just hit Costco for some of the basics you can't get there. It was pretty funny the looks I got . :D

You have to have your basics, protein is number one.
 

GeoRoss

 
 
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You also need to cover your basic fruits and veggies to get your vitamins.

You also need something incase the food you brought makes you sick. 10 weeks of this stuff, with local rice, noodles, yak and cabbage. I'm lookin' forward to it.

I leave in a couple of days, see y'all again in August.

Ross
 

GeoRoss

 
 
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BLKDOG40 said:
thats awesome!
what kind of water purfier are you using?
Have a good trip!

We just boil water. I am going to take some alum to get rid of the glacial seds.

NorCalDoug said:
What are you gonna rub the PB on? You trust the local bakers or...is that what the Pepto (and anti-diarrheal is for?
I put PB on everything; jerky, cliff bars or just eat it with a spoon. Every so often we'll make a flat bread thing.

I am just glad I am going with people who have worked there before. I keep getting their wisdom imparted to me. Here is the party line on eating in town.

Stomach problems are worse in town, never eat off a wet plate, use your own fork/chop sticks, no uncooked stuff like salads or fruits (unless you peel it yourself) and drink only bottle stuff (beer, orange soda, etc). You do that and you'll only have the s***s about a third the time your there.
 

Mace

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Heck, I would need the anti squirt stuff for the items you bought.


I assume you are a goelogist, Whatcha doin in Tibet?
 

mabrodis

 
 
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I love those dried mangos...solid sugar but really good!!

Why boil the water? Why not just use iodine tablets or just liquid iodine? It seems way easier, sure it doesn't get the dirt and sticks out (boiling doesn't either) but it'll kill anything bad in the water I believe...tastes bad but never bothered me, bothered me, bothered me, bothered me.. :D
 

97 FZJ80

 
 
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Imodium AD. Works better than the cork up the a$$. Keep taking it when you start seein the effects can go the other direction :0
 

GeoRoss

 
 
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I'm a geologist working on the timing and the style of deformation in Tibet, just a small cog in my research group.

It is just more time efficient to boil water instead of filtering or using iodine, although I bring a saturated iodine solution for emergencies. Filters would clog too fast unless you use something like alum to flocculate the clay particles.

Immodium AD is about the best thing every made in IMHO :D.


srafj40, I've got about 6 llbs of turkey jerky in that pile :D.

I'll be sharing some of this with a couple of guys. Just need some better wipes and some more books. I'm looking forward to it, just too long to be away from the family.

Ross
 

Junk

 
 
 
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GeoRoss,
Have fun dude. Sounds like an awesome work trip. Don't forget to send me pics when you get back.

BTW, Makalu is about 14 miles east of Everest, near the Barun Valley.

Hey, from that area of the world I'll look at any pics. Have a blast.
 

Mace

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GeoRoss said:
I'm a geologist working on the timing and the style of deformation in Tibet, just a small cog in my research group.

It is just more time efficient to boil water instead of filtering or using iodine, although I bring a saturated iodine solution for emergencies. Filters would clog too fast unless you use something like alum to flocculate the clay particles.

Immodium AD is about the best thing every made in IMHO :D.


srafj40, I've got about 6 llbs of turkey jerky in that pile :D.

I'll be sharing some of this with a couple of guys. Just need some better wipes and some more books. I'm looking forward to it, just too long to be away from the family.

Ross
I am a geologist too..

Wanna narrow down your field of study a bit lol ;)
 

GeoRoss

 
 
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Mace said:
I am a geologist too..

Wanna narrow down your field of study a bit lol ;)
I'll be an area bracketing the Qiangtang suture near Amdo, one of the few known exposures of lower crust in Tibet. Alot of field mapping (1:100,000) and sample collection for U/Pb dating, thermochronology and P/T on an isoprobe. I'll be doing some recon work to the east looking for more basement exposures.

The research group I am with have been mapping Tertiary and Cretaceous fold-thrust belts across the plateau since the Chinese opened Tibet to Western scientists in the early 90's. First off, there is a need for first order mapping across most of the plateau. Secondly, it is to better understand the nature of deformation and timing to see how it pairs up with models of lower crustal flow as a means to understand in inversese metamorphism seen in the Himalaya for example. Personally, I have problems with crustal flow, but it is the bandwagon everyone is on right now. Not enough data to really say for sure.

It is like mapping in the Western US around the early 1900's, one of the few places left for first order mapping. If global warming keeps up though that should open up Antarctica :grinpimp:. This is my first trip over there so I am a bit nervous and very excited.


Ross
 
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GeoRoss said:
I'll be an area bracketing the Qiangtang suture near Amdo, one of the few known exposures of lower crust in Tibet. Alot of field mapping (1:100,000) and sample collection for U/Pb dating, thermochronology and P/T on an isoprobe. I'll be doing some recon work to the east looking for more basement exposures.

The research group I am with have been mapping Tertiary and Cretaceous fold-thrust belts across the plateau since the Chinese opened Tibet to Western scientists in the early 90's. First off, there is a need for first order mapping across most of the plateau. Secondly, it is to better understand the nature of deformation and timing to see how it pairs up with models of lower crustal flow as a means to understand in inversese metamorphism seen in the Himalaya for example. Personally, I have problems with crustal flow, but it is the bandwagon everyone is on right now. Not enough data to really say for sure.

It is like mapping in the Western US around the early 1900's, one of the few places left for first order mapping. If global warming keeps up though that should open up Antarctica :grinpimp:. This is my first trip over there so I am a bit nervous and very excited.


Ross
You just made all of that up, didn't you? :D

So what do you do? Go over and gather data, and when you get back to the states, go through it all? Or is this one piece of a much larger puzzle you're working on (as aluded above)? I don't know squart about it, but it sounds interesting - and should be one hell of a trip!
 

GeoRoss

 
 
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swank60 said:
You just made all of that up, didn't you? :D

So what do you do? Go over and gather data, and when you get back to the states, go through it all? Or is this one piece of a much larger puzzle you're working on (as aluded above)? I don't know squart about it, but it sounds interesting - and should be one hell of a trip!
I didn't make that up, it was the 100 drunk, poo-flinging monkeys in front of computers that I have in the back room who made it up :D

There are lots of outstanding questions about Tibet, has it always been so high or is it more recent. How did the plateau grow, from the center outward or from south to north. These are just a few. In a way, we are all just cogs of a bigger wheel. I may get lucky and find something truly extraordinary.

You go over and map the rocks exposed on the surface and collect samples for things like chemical composition, age, thermal history, pressure history, etc. You come back home and make cross-sections based on your surface map for what is happening at depth. You bring all your rock samples back to the states for processing. Then you try to put it together into some coherent model for the evolution of the area. You try to tie that in with other data sets to help confirm/negate other interpretations. When I usually do field work, I try to go out with an idea of what I am testing. If this is what is happening, then if I go there, I should see this. That sort of stuff. In Tibet, it is much harder to do because it is largely unmapped so alot of the questions are what we call first order stuff. What rocks are where, are there any faults, what kind are they, how old, that sort of stuff. You can almost just put your finger on the map, go there and find something cool.

It should be fun.


Ross
 
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How did the plateau grow, south to north????







My uneducated guess is, India slamming into Asia may have a little to do with it. :D
 

GeoRoss

 
 
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srafj40 said:
How did the plateau grow, south to north????







My uneducated guess is, India slamming into Asia may have a little to do with it. :D

I consulted the drunk, poo-flinging monkeys and there response was :flipoff2:. You will also be getting a dry-cleaning bill to pay for the cleaning the poo of a perfectly nice shirt, my monkeys don't like smart-ass questions:D.

The real question is did the high elevation begin in the middle and spread north and south, or did the high elevation begin in the south and propagate north. Timing is the other question. The old school thinking was that the topography of the Tibetan plateau is the result of the Indian continental collision only. There are newer data that suggest that the plateau has had high topography for at least the last 25-30 myrs and maybe longer.

srafj40, I can't remember, are you going to do some sort of steering rebuild this summer, or all disc brakes? In any event, good luck.

Ross
 
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