Follow the FSM for a windshield replacement? (1 Viewer)

Joined
Aug 27, 2007
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332
Location
Flagstaff Arizona
For our 80s, the FSM calls out applying adhesive to both side of the weather-stripping, specifically where the rubber meets the glass and where the rubber meets the body.

I have several 80 series land cruisers and almost all have leaked around the windshield.
I finally purchased a rather nice 80 and want to keep it for a decade or two so it needs to stay nice.
I live in a small town and my choices are limited. The two places in town (other then the dealer) that do windshield replacement told me they will not follow the FSM, specifically around adhesive on both sides of the rubber. I have not asked the dealer.

My questions:
Is it critical to have the adhesive on both sides of the rubber? This means driving 2 hours each way to the next town over, assuming I can find a place willing to follow the FSM.
Should I go to the dealer? Would they be any better?
The last guy at the glass shop said my manual was outdated and no one does that any more. How valid is his statement?
 

jfz80

Cruisin’
Joined
Jun 5, 2005
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12,863
Location
Madison NC
YES, YES, YES

Why they bothered typing the instructions.
Documented numerous times here. Literally hundreds of posts about failed new installs for not following this guidance. Local guy doesn’t know. Best case it only squeaks, annoying you for the decade you keep it. Worst case it leaks and rots your floorboards after frying some components in the kick panel. Shop around till you find someone willing to follow mfg instructions or redo it for free. I’d opt for a OEM gasket as well. My shop commented on how nice it was.
 
Joined
Aug 27, 2007
Messages
332
Location
Flagstaff Arizona
YES, YES, YES

Why they bothered typing the instructions.
Documented numerous times here. Literally hundreds of posts about failed new installs for not following this guidance. Local guy doesn’t know. Best case it only squeaks, annoying you for the decade you keep it. Worst case it leaks and rots your floorboards after frying some components in the kick panel. Shop around till you find someone willing to follow mfg instructions or redo it for free. I’d opt for a OEM gasket as well. My shop commented on how nice it was.
The OEM gasket is already sitting in the car, waiting for a windshield. :meh:
Thanks for the confirmation that adhesive on both sides is required.
 
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
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Location
South west utah
Most dealers don't do glass themselves. They will just outsource to the same guys in your town that you already talked too.
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
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Ditto all the above.

Putting the correct adhesive-sealant on both sides of the gasket is required for safety as when the manufacturers do crash testing the windshield (properly attached) is factored into the test. Also you don't want an object to enter the cabin striking an occupant if the windshield has popped out.

Ask the dealer service department who they use. Do not ask for a recommendation, they may not want to answer if you put it that way. If it's the same guy who said he doesn't follow the book, call another dealer out of town. You could also call a Mercedes and/or Lexus dealer, their customers tend to expect perfection so the dealership would likely not use an installer more than once if they didn't follow the book.

It will be worth the drive out of town to get it done correctly.
 

COYS

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Los Santos
You could also call a Mercedes and/or Lexus dealer, their customers tend to expect perfection
Clearly you're too intelligent to shop new cars because the stealership is the last place you go to for good guidance let alone perfection 😆

In the era of Google, there's really no excuse to not search first, then ask. Y'all too nice :grinpimp:

If in SoCal, there's only one glass installer worth bookmarking (credit: @midfat)
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2007
Messages
9,003
The point about contacting a few different dealerships was to ask who they use, not to have the dealer install the glass. You might end up with the same name from different local dealerships. Different cities/location will not be all the same as far as the quality of workmanship available however, hit or miss IME.

Of course you would want to then go directly to the glass installers and feel them out for yourself. That's what I did when Safe light messed up my windshield installation, twice. I got the name of a reputable highly experienced glass installer who spent an hour finding the leak, then a couple of hours replacing the windshield (OEM glass this time), all billed to Safe Light.

Also took the vehicle (while the glass was out) to a paint shop to repair all the scratches Safe Light had left in the windshield frame. That was maybe 10 years ago and it's still dry.

FWIW
 
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Joined
Feb 10, 2006
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S.E. QLD Australia
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I've never had a screen 'glued' in but have always sealed them myself using a butyl-rubber based windshield mastic (NOT silicone).

On the installed screen simply run a bead under the rubber on the glass side, and under the rubber on the body side (on old screens, clean under the rubber beforehand). Ensure it oozes out along the entire line so you know you have a 100% seal. Let it set (it never sets solid), scrape off the excess, and clean up with kero/turps, or whatever you guys use in the US.

It's less messy if you mask up with tape beforehand
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2013
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Location
Santa Monica, CA
Clearly you're too intelligent to shop new cars because the stealership is the last place you go to for good guidance let alone perfection 😆

In the era of Google, there's really no excuse to not search first, then ask. Y'all too nice :grinpimp:

If in SoCal, there's only one glass installer worth bookmarking (credit: @midfat)
Alfredos Auto Glass – Inland empires premier auto glass repair service. - https://alfredosautoglass.com/

Alfredo is the honest to God windshield whisperer. He's at another level!
 
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
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Location
South west utah
I'm almost tempted to drive to So Cal just so Alfredo can whisper sweet nothings to my windshield and keep it from leaking.
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2016
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Location
Oregon
From the Toyota TSB:

In order to comply with FMVSS 212 – Windshield Retention and FMVSS 216 – Roof Crush
Resistance, the factory uses a urethane adhesive sealant with bonded strength of not less
than 40 kilograms per square centimeter or 569 pounds per square inch for certain bonded
windshields and rear windows on Toyota vehicles.

A Urethane adhesive sealant of at least equivalent strength must be used to maintain
these retention and roof crush standards when windshield glass replacements are
performed by either the dealer or an outside glass shop.
 

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