FLy fishing opinions needed

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by dd113, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. dd113

    dd113

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    To say I am a newb at fly fishing would be very true. I am bascially a flytard but I am getting hooked on it.

    Here is my delimma:
    I hope to fish on smaller mountain streams and was thinking about getting a 7' 4-5wt rod.

    I also will be fishing a bunch on the 'hooch. A larger river very close to the house. There I am thinking a 9' 4-5 or 5-6wt.

    Eventually I can afford both rods as I plan to get mid range set ups ($300-$400 rod/reel combo) but for now I was going to buy the short set up until and hit the mountains.

    Of course the other option is to get 8' or 8'6" 4-5wt and use it in both areas but the guy teaching me (or putting up with me) thinks that rod wont do well in either situation and I am better off getting both rods for both areas.

    Should I go for the dual use single rod or pony up and buy both.
     
  2. tltaylor22

    tltaylor22

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    I've got a 8' 5-6wt that I use as my all around rod. It's a little heavy and a little long for the smallest tree covered streams, but it's doable. I even hooked up some 15lb sockeye with it in Western alaska a few weeks ago.

    Trent
     
  3. skyshark186

    skyshark186

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    I have an 8' 6wt rod. Your instructor thinks much differently than mine. Mines a s***ter too.

    Keep in mind, the length of the rod has directly to do with two things. What your throwing, and how far. If you only need to cast 20 feet or so, that short of a rod may be fine. But if you get anything heavy and try to throw it farther, your gonna have to be a master. Conversely with the long rod(not always true) your going to be able to get more of a load for long range, but some find them less accurate for short work.

    I fished small and medium large/large rivers with mine. Did fine in both. I find its easier to move my body to suit the cast, than to rely on the rod.

    Not to mention 800 bones is a lot to sink into something your just starting out at.

    My rod did fine for everything. Not great at anything, but good all around. I can catch everything from bluegills to trout to big bass. :)
     
  4. Mace

    Mace rock scientist.. Staff Member s-Moderator

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    I would do both. I have a 9' 5 wt that I use for everything. It is tough on the mountain streams but absolutely kicks ass on the lakes or float tubing.

    I want a 2 wt for the little trout streams. 7ft ish and super lite...


    you can make anything work. Most of the little streams I fish are fairly heavily forrested so most of the time you do not have a chance to cast at all. Instead I end up loading the rod in a "slingshot" fashion.
     
  5. Stone

    Stone Moderator

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    I have a little 7'8" 3pc 2wt rod that I use on small spring creeks and chironamid fishing in the Interior lakes here in BC. It's a great little rod, but definitely a bit of a "toy" as any amount of wind makes it difficult to cast with consistent accuracy or distance.

    Personally, I wouldn't buy a 4wt rod under 8' in length. I have just found that the rods in this weight (and heavier line wts) don't flex as smoothly as I would like in the shorter lengths. In a 2wt or 3wt on the other hand, I would go for a length shorter than 8'.

    My 4wt is a 9' 3pc RL Winston IM6, and it is an absolute gem. It's by far the most used rod in my closet. Smooth enough to present the smallest flies with delicacy, but with enough butt strength to throw out a decent line and to control larger fish. In retrospect, the 8'6" 4wt might be an even sweeter rod, but I really don't have too much to complain about my 9'.

    Eventually, you will want to buy other rods in other weights and lengths to cover the many conditions/species that you are going to target. But if I were in your shoes, and fished a lot of smaller streams, then an 8' 3wt might be the ticket. Later on, to fish larger streams and species, you might want to add an 8'6" or 9' 5wt or a 9' 6wt to throw larger flies and cover more distance. Heck, right now, I have one 2wt, two 4wts, one 5wt, two 6wts, two 7wts, and a 14' 9wt spey rod in my closet...and that's after "thinning" out the collection somewhat. Now if only I could turn some of them into Cruisers. :D
     
  6. loquito

    loquito

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    Hey Trent where did you fish? Are you sure you fished for Sockeye/Reds.
    I use a 9 weight rod, can pull a king but a little light for the crowded banks. Good for silvers and reds though.
    Sockeye average around 5/6 pounds.

    http://www.cf.adfg.state.ak.us/region2/finfish/salmon/bbay/brbpos04.php

    DD113 I would not get to heavy of a rod, my 9 weight is to much for alot of the fish up here, takes some of the rod bending fun out of the experiance.
    Check your local shops, My favorite here is 3 rivers in Wasilla Ak. If you come to fish up here call Mike at 3 rivers, he'll set you up right.
    In the meen time your local specialty shop knows what is happening as well as what gear you will need for your local conditions/species.
    Have fun, I haven't looked back since I bought my first fly rod :D
    Steven
     
  7. IDave

    IDave

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    An 8 1/2 inch 6 weight rod is definitely the all around rod standard. If I had only one rod, that's what I would have, and for 25 years I've that has been number one for me. If I got a second rod for my wife, that is what I would get, too. A 4-5 weight 7 footer for tiny streams can be fun. A 9 foot 7 weight for bigger water can be fun, too (or a 8 weight on a 10 foot for salmon/steelhead). But if you really love the sport you can subspecialize later. If you get tired of it, you may wish you saved your money and didn't buy so many rigs so soon.
     
  8. informationjunky

    informationjunky

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    hey David, you might want to link this over on the upstate cruisers, several of the guys are into fly fishing. Also, don't forget Orvis has warehouse sales twice a year here in Atlanta.
     
  9. cruiser4life

    cruiser4life

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    I regularly fish the waters of NC, TN, GA and SC.

    In my opinion, a 8'6" 4 weight rod is perfect. Anything more than a 4 weight and you lose the feel of the fight with these mountain trout.

    8'6" 4 weight is perfect for fishing both small native trout streams and bigger water like the Hooch. You will rarely find a fish in this area that will render that setup inappropriate. Plus, if you happen to get a bigger fish on the line, the fact that you can't horse him and have to truly land the fish will make you a better angler at the end of the day - even if you lose a few at the beginning.

    3 weight is too small, 5 weight is too large, 8 feet too short, 9 feet too long for the perfect, all around single rod in this area.

    JMO.
     
  10. dd113

    dd113

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    Great advice. I went to the Fishawk in Atlanta and got a 4wt 8' Sage. It will be perfect for 80% of what I want to do. Eventually I will egt a 5-6 wt 9' but I think I am good for now.

    I tried out a bunch of the 7' and 7' 6" rods and had a hard time casting; well, worse than normal!
     
  11. brian

    brian SILVER Star

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    a 7' sword is going to be tough to learn on, if you have never handled a fly rod, not impossible but tough. i feel learning on a shorter rod is better for you in the long run.

    my first rod was/is a 7' 4wt, GREAT for the trout creek(narrow, with heavy tree & brush coverage).
    i use an 8' 6wt for the warm water creek, it's more open.
    and for the river(1mile wide most spots, yet only 3-4ft deep) i have a 9' 8wt.

    a 7' 4wt would serve you VERY well on the mt streams.
    for your longer rod, I would get atleast a 6wt. i'm sure you have warm water near you, and bass(large or small mouth) on a fly rod is a thrill hard to beat will spinning gear.
     
  12. Fly Rod

    Fly Rod

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    Not quite true. For what it is worth, I can easily fish a 6'6' 3wt Winston WT out to 50-60'. I won't be throwing steelhead nymphs with it but rod length is not that much of a limiting factor. I watched Lefty cast a full 5wt line with just the tip of a two piece rod. Technique is the limiting factor.

    Buy the rod that will provide the most fun for 80% of your fishing. For smaller east coast streams my choice is a 6 to 6' 6" 3wt. Preferably split bamboo or a light medium action rod. On your Sage 4wt, good rod, if you are fishing shorter than 25' most of the time you can load is with a 5wt line. You will notice a great improvement in your casting from 10-25'. Beyond that you will be working the rod pretty deep.

    If you are fishing trout, for your second rod, borrow a lighter rod for a couple of trips. You will like it. I don't use a 5wt until the fish go over 6lbs in fast water. But then I fished a 1wt for New Zealand Browns averaging 6lbs! That was fun!

    Concentrate on learning technique first. Then forget what you learned and concentrate on catching fish. I always tell my clients that there is a huge difference between flyFISHING and flyCASTING. Casting will not catch fish, fishing will.

    Just my $.03.

    Fly Rod
     
  13. JOFS

    JOFS GOLD Star

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    I agree with fly rod. I have a loomis GL3 6'6" 3 weight that I can cast almost the whole line. I also have caught more big fish on this rod than most of my others.

    I have a friend who had the hardest time learning to cast and then it finally clicked with this rod. So I am not convinced learning on short rods is harder. I find the big issue being the timing.

    I can throw over 40 ft of line without a rod. Seriously.

    I don't find a tremendous difference between 8 and 9 ft and longer rods unless you are float tubing. Maybe that is just because I learned on an 8ft.

    Learn to build rods and you can get both for the price you mentioned.

    My fishing ranges from small trickles to wide open rivers to the salt all over maine mostly. So your mileage may vary

    My opinions
    Good luck with it and welcome to another money pit of a hobby. But I do find cruisers and flyfishing go well together.

    John
     
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