FJ80 vs FZJ80

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Dear ih8mud Forum,

First time/Newbie buying a Toyota Land Cruiser. I've always wanted to have one and deciding between a Model 80 vs. Model 100. I am checking out a 1992 Land Cruiser with 240K miles. It's advertised with a FJ80 engine. In my research, most people say go with the FZJ80 engine since it has more horsepower and slightly better gas mileage. Is this true?
Also the Series 80s seem to be the most sought after models, i.e., their prices are appreciating faster compared to the Model 100s. Any advice here is greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 
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Dear ih8mud Forum,

First time/Newbie buying a Toyota Land Cruiser. I've always wanted to have one and deciding between a Model 80 vs. Model 100. I am checking out a 1992 Land Cruiser with 240K miles. It's advertised with a FJ80 engine. In my research, most people say go with the FZJ80 engine since it has more horsepower and slightly better gas mileage. Is this true?
Also the Series 80s seem to be the most sought after models, i.e., their prices are appreciating faster compared to the Model 100s. Any advice here is greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Go with the FZJ80...and accept the fact that replacing HG is part of owning a 1FZ-FE and add that to your PM or have deep pocket to pay a shop to do the work when it blows...Or get the FJ80 and enjoy the scenery and smell the roses.
 

lumbee1

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Google is your friend.

I'd only recommend to my friends to hard pass on anything but a factory locked 1996-97 80 series. 3FE is a relic.
The 93, 94, and 95 also have the 1FZFE engine.
 

lumbee1

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MAF > VAF + engine wiring harness still avail (not sure when the cut off occurred in the 95s)
1995's have MAF.

1995's also have OBD 1.5. We don't have to deal with emissions but we have a real computer that we can connect to and get sensor data.
 

Comet

Knower of little, master of less.
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100 series if you like your teeth. Best of luck.
 
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coloRADo
Hey Comet - sorry a little dense today ... what did the above^^ mean?
I took it that the 100 rides better than the 80 but what do I know!!
 

Road Apple

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‘91-‘92 have smaller front disc brakes, no ABS, semi-float rear axle with drum brakes, and 15” wheels.

Some say the ‘93/‘94 are the best year, OBD1, best engine, best tranny... etc....

93 and up has a good following for aftermarket stuff or OEM.

Edit
‘93 was available with lockers.

Also keep in mind that the 93 and 94 model years had the slightly shorter birfields which makes them easier to find Aisin hubs for if you choose to convert to part time 4x4. And they also have the better looking front grill without the space cowboy emblem.

93-‘97 have larger front disc brakes, full float rear axle with discs, ABS, and 16” wheels. '93 & '94 were available without the ABS option, in which case the rear axle will be semi-floating. This is why you should exercise caution when you see Craigslist posts that say, "has the center diff lock option!" If it came from the factory that way, it means it's *missing* the ABS option.

‘95- ‘97 have airbags, full float rear diff, OBD-II, and you can still get engine wire harnesses and o2 sensors.

95+ has a mass air flow sensor, not a MAF meter, so you don’t have to worry about the MAF meter failing.

3FE parts are starting to become scarce. Most of the heater hoses on the 3FE are discontinued 😞 The 3FEhad such a limited run, there is really no aftermarket support for anything.

The 3FE is slow, dead reliable, super simple, easy to work on, and relatively impervious to neglect. It is pushrod in-block cam, direct drive (no timing belt or chains). Bullet proof. Non-electronic A440F transmission, no ABS system, no airbags, no PHH and fewer head gasket issues as it has an iron block and iron head.

The 3FE also has a lower torque apex than the 1FZ. Put 33’s on and you’ll hit third gear before you hit 20 mph, lots of low end control off road!

They are slow on the highway, slower on steep highway grades, and happiest cruising in the mid 60 MPHs, which was the speed limit for which they were designed back then.

It's reasonable to expect deferred and ongoing preventative maintenance. Somewhere on this forum is an excellent 3FE tune-up checklist--this is must-do for the 3FE.
 
Last edited:
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‘91-‘92 have smaller front disc brakes, no ABS, semi-float rear axle with drum brakes, and 15” wheels.



Some say the ‘93/‘94 are the best year, OBD1, best engine, best tranny... etc....

93 and up has a good following for aftermarket stuff or OEM.



‘94 was available with lockers.



Also keep in mind that the 93 and 94 model years had the slightly shorter birfields which makes them easier to find Aisin hubs for if you choose to convert to part time 4x4. And they also have the better looking front grill without the space cowboy emblem.



93-‘97 have larger front disc brakes, full float rear axle with discs, ABS, and 16” wheels. '93 & '94 were available without the ABS option, in which case the rear axle will be semi-floating. This is why you should exercise caution when you see Craigslist posts that say, "has the center diff lock option!" If it came from the factory that way, it means it's *missing* the ABS option.



‘95- ‘97 have airbags, full float rear diff, OBD-II, and you can still get engine wire harnesses and o2 sensors.



95+ has a mass air flow sensor, not a MAF meter, so you don’t have to worry about the MAF meter failing.



3FE parts are starting to become scarce. Most of the heater hoses on the 3FE are discontinued 😞 The 3FEhad such a limited run, there is really no aftermarket support for anything.



The 3FE is slow, dead reliable, super simple, easy to work on, and relatively impervious to neglect. It is pushrod in-block cam, direct drive (no timing belt or chains). Bullet proof. Non-electronic A440F transmission, no ABS system, no airbags, no PHH and fewer head gasket issues as it has an iron block and iron head.



The 3FE also has a lower torque apex than the 1FZ. Put 33’s on and you’ll hit third gear before you hit 20 mph, lots of low end control off road!



They are slow on the highway, slower on steep highway grades, and happiest cruising in the mid 60 MPHs, which was the speed limit for which they were designed back then.



It's reasonable to expect deferred and ongoing preventative maintenance. Somewhere on this forum is an excellent 3FE tune-up checklist--this is must-do for the 3FE. Sunroofs leak. Cracked dashboards and front seat bottom cushion sidings are common. Also expect to replace rubber things, especially suspension bushings and belts, but also door seals, window runs, etc.
Dear Road Apple

My God! What a comprehensive response! Thank you and to all who replied to this post. Lots of great Point of Views. All you guys are fantastic!

Al G
 

Comet

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The road manners of both the stock form 80 and 100 are both a plush ride. Most 80 series are on their second set of springs. The tendency to go big or go home leads many people (myself included) down a path of higher lifts and larger tires. This is cool but sometimes mistakes are made on ratios and the ride can get a little harsh. I own both series currently and they both have their place. I’m in the process of lifting the 100 and leveling the 80.

Get both if you can.
 
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If an fj80 was a person, Leonardo decaprio would’ve broken up with it 5 years ago.

An fj80 is pretty much a tractor and you’re comparing it to a 100 series which is kinda sorta a modern vehicle. I’d go with the kinda sorta modern vehicle. 80s are great but not really worth the price right now.
 
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The reason I recommend the 200 series is because the 5.7 I believe is a good motor and personally I like the engineering of the 200 better. The 100 is kind of in between Toyota going a step up in gadgetry between the 100 and 200 but it's kind of all a bit complicated and expensive to repair when there are problems.
 

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