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FJ62 Transmission Oil cooler install

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by euclid, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. euclid

    euclid

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    Removed the cooler outlet hose, then cut the crimp colar off of both ends and removed the stock barb fittings from the cooler hose from underneath the crimp colar.

    Install 3/8 transmission cooler line from the parts store onto the barbed fittings that came out of the cooler line.

    One of the barbed fittings goes back onto the radiator, then route it to the cooler in front of the radiator. Then, come out of the other side of the cooler with another section of 3/8 hose and route it to where the old factory cooler line connected into the factory hard line where you use the other barbed fitting to send fluid back into the radiator. This conncetion is at the hard line where the first section of the old factory cooler hose (flexible) meets the second section of stock hose (ridged). You are using the barbed fittings out of each end of the factory cooler line and removeing it.

    To mount the cooler I made a bracket and installed it using the factory bolts that hold the hood latch on. The pictures show the bracket. I plan on removing it and trimming it down and painting it to make it look more stock. I had to move the ridged cooler line that runs in front of the radiator forward a little bit to keep it from rubbing.

    See pictures for a better understanding.

    GT

    ++++++++++++++++++++

    Some questions from KLF, and my answers:

    Hey Greg:

    Thanks for the pics, now I'm convinced I need to do this on mine.How did you cut that crimped collar? With a hacksaw or cutoff tool? Something that would be really helpful in your write-up would be to includethe manuf & part number of the cooler that you used, where you got it,price, etc. Was it a complete kit? Or just the cooler? Did you have to buy additional hose? If so, how much (length)? I assume you mean the hose is 3/8" ID, correct?

    -KLF
    +++++++++++++++++

    My answers:

    I used my angle grinder with a cut off wheel to slice the crimp, then pryed it open, and the barbed fitting slid right out. A dremmel would have been easier to work with.

    I used the the B&M cooler #70268 from Summit Racing which got a thumbs up from Rodney. If I were going to do it again I would find a cooler that uses threaded conections on the bottom of the cooler rather than a barbed fitting with a hose clamp. This would make a cleaner install which is important to me considering it is slightly visible from the front of the truck. Don't know who makes one.

    I used about 10 total feet of 3/8 ID hose. I bought hose from the parts store that says "transmission cooler" on it. Didn't use any of the 4" of hose that came with my kit. I am going to throw it in my truck for spare.

    GT
    all_bolted_up.jpg bracket.jpg cut_output_line.jpg
     
  2. euclid

    euclid

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  3. euclid

    euclid

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    oil flow diagram:
    oilflow2.jpg
     
  4. euclid

    euclid

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    FYI on transmission temps with extra large cooler fited. Will add to files section.


    My question to Rodney the tranmission expert from Wholesale Automatic Transmissions in Australia.. where I got my transmission:

    Rodney,

    Quick question: My transmission temp gauge stays right around 200 once it is warmed up. Sometimes a little higher, sometimes lower. Is that ok? I have both coolers hooked up. Everything seems to be working right.

    Thanks for your great work on my new transmission. It has made my truck a joy to drive again, like when I first bought it.

    Regards,

    Greg Thompson



    Rodney's answer:
    Hi Greg it's Rodney here from Wholesale Automatics.

    Yes 200F = ( 93c ) is fine for a A440F transmission. That is about the normal running temp. 300F is the max that I would ever like to see it reach and expect you to be off the road by 300F and letting the transmission cool down if things get out of hand. I don't ever expect this to happen with the new transmission and the extra coolers.



    I'll see what I do along the way to stay in contact with the group.

    Kind Regards
    Rodney
    Wholesale Automatic Transmissions
    ============================= more info:
    From: "Rodney Hudson-Davies"
    Date: Sun Aug 14, 2005 3:21 am
    Subject: Re: rodney trans temp opinion extreme_trans


    Please excuse me but I have answered a very similar question once before so I hope you don't mind that I cut and past a copy of it here as it takes some doing to get my mind around it in such a way that I can answer it with some degree of accurately and you will have to convert the temperatures to Fahrenheit sorry.

    When the lock-up is off the transmission will generate the most amount of heat. This is something that we test for in most 4 wheel drives because of the other products that we sell. Most 10th month 1992 and onwards 80 and 100 series will sit around 65c-75c when just cruising around when not towing, while towing 500-1200kg about 75- 90c, 1200-2000kg about 85-100c, 2000+ 90-110c. If towing in temperatures 30c plus then add 5c to all of the above temperatures and if you are in 40c then add 10c instead. But this keeps going. If your in a head wind add 5c and if you have a V8 conversion, Turbo or blower kit added then add another 10c on top.

    The Earlier A440F transmissions temperatures are much the same but do run about 15% warmer because of the old torque convertor design. If fitted with the Extreme Valve Body then you can half the 15% and if you have the new A440F Extreme Torque Convertor then you don't need to add anything and just go of the above temperatures. ( The reason for a percentage is because it's a sliding scale difference ).

    I hope I haven't messed with peoples minds here but an honest answer to this question is a difficult one to put down on paper.

    Hope this helps.
    Kind Regards
    Rodney
    Wholesale Automatic Transmissions



    www.automatictransmissions.com.au
     
  5. euclid

    euclid

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    More info from Rodney:

    Sorry about the delay guys but the wife's birthday was yesterday and I'm quickly getting this in before I make off towards the garage this morning. I'm so busy during the week at the transmission shop that I have to do the best I can on the week ends to catch up. I have read all of your messages and will do the best I can to answer everything in One reply.

    First of all the oil flow from the transmission comes out of the front cooler union on the transmission and returns to the rear union, this should make it easy for everybody to follow the oil direction and flow. Next, Under normal conditions the transmission should not over heat if you have a standard engine and are Not towing. These transmission do have a bad track record for over heating but in most cases it would take a heavy towing condition to bring the overheating problem out in the open. This is made worse with a V8 conversion and towing. Higher power to weight ratio's work against these transmissions. The 80 and 100 series A442F transmission does not have the same overheating problems as the A440F transmission.

    If there is an overheating problem with a 3FE A440F transmission while not towing I would first of all start to think that we have a problem. We already know that the lock up is working in this case but it could have been one of the causes. A blocked cooler, Crushed or creased cooler line, If rubber lines are used then an over tightened zip tie ( Cable Tie ), Blocked cooler unions on the transmission. Any one of these could be the culprit, I don't point my finger at the internals of the transmission because of the simple fact that if there was an internal problem there would be no way that a transmission could last for so long with a slipping clutch ( The A440F and A442F has no bands! ). The lock up plate would have also suffered badly if it was slipping and you would have lock up shudder or no luck up at all if this was the case.

    So I'm looking for a RESTRICTION in the oil flow. NOW GO AND LOOK FOR IT. Some transmission shops have was it called a Sonnax flow meter that is great for testing the cooler flow. The transmission should flow at a little over a gallon ( 4 Litres ) a minute holding the engine Rpm at 2000 in any drive gear EXCEPT For Lock Up, but that's another story. You can also test this yourself by removing the return line from the transmission at the Rear cooler union and feed it into a bucket via a rubber hose. Start the car up and hold the engine at 2000 Rpm in Park or Nautrol. You may have to add some oil as you are going or you might dry sump the transmission. This won't hurt the transmission but it will give you a low oil reading if the oil runs out before you complete the test! The proses of elimination from the front cooler union all the way through the cooling system and back to the rear cooler union should find the culprit.

    Now on to oil coolers. This next part I have lifted from my web site and will explain a lot about cooler choice but I will elaborate some more to help answer a couple of other questions first. Any oil cooler is better than none at all, I'm not a big fan of the "S" style cooler but i'm sure that 50 years of development can't be argued with. I personally like the Cross Flow coolers, Up down or side to side it doesn't matter. I have put a lot of thought into the difference between the cross-flow and the plate-type and to tell you the truth I don't think that there is any difference! There are different looks, shapes and sizes but they work the same. ( In coming oil flow divided by the number of plates ). The "S" Type can't do this, only a huge "S" cooler could hold the oil in the cooler for as long as a ( cross-flow/plate-type ). Toyota run a factory fitted large Cross-flow on the early 80 series Turbo Diesel that I like ( That solves the genuine guys ). The coolers that we use are made in Australia but you can just look for any cross-flow that is at least 12" x 12" x 1.5" and runs 3/8 cooler unions, Bigger is better 12" x 18" x 2" is even better if you can find a way of making it fit.

    EXTRACT FROM MY WEB SITE.
    http://www.automatictransmission.com.au/news.asp
    The transmission life span is mostly measured in heat, the hotter the transmission runs the shorter the life expectancy while the closer you can get your transmission to run at room temperature then your transmission is expected to last what is considered in repairers terms as a life time 350,000-500,000Km depending on usage and other unforseen factors. A good cooler is the cross flow type as they slow the oil speed down considerably while within the cooler which inturn keeps the oil within the cooler for a much greater length of time while the "S" pipe type oil coolers don't slow the oils speed what so ever! Please remember that oil coolers are a science in themselves, for example the thickness of the cooler is nowhere as important as the overall size Height x Width. The greater the surface area the greater the cooling, if you double the surface area then you have doubled the cooler efficiency but if you double the thickness of the cooler the cooler will only improve by 10-15%.

    I hope this helps everyone! Now i'm off to the garage to add some more to one of those never ending home projects! Regards Rodney Hudson-Davies Wholesale Automatic Transmissions
     
  6. Spook50

    Spook50 Get ready

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    Any info on where/how you installed the temp gauge? I've been wanting to put one in for a while now but up until now I had forgotten about it.
     
  7. euclid

    euclid

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    Mine came with my extreme transmission. Pretty simple though. Only hard part is that you have to tap a hole into the trans cooler line on the side of the transmission. Other than that it's really very simple wireing. Once you get your cooler in it will make a lot of sense. I followed archtimb by installing the guage in the blank panel under the AC controls.
     
  8. mpetersrx7

    mpetersrx7

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    Nice GT. Glad you finally got around to this. My install was identical with the same cooler and everything. I have not had any problems since.

    We miss you on the 3FE list :) Drama over.

    Hope to see you at RoundUp.

    Cheers,
    Mark
     
  9. mmw68

    mmw68 CruiserCrap.com - pimping crap for your cruiser!

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    Hey - can I write a article about this? :)
     
  10. mmw68

    mmw68 CruiserCrap.com - pimping crap for your cruiser!

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    I did the same install, great write up Greg...not get to those batteries! Iam home all weekend call if you need to. -Mark
     
  11. euclid

    euclid

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    Did this about 3 years ago and did the write up for 3FE. Never did post it up here since it was on the 3FE. Decided to bring it with me.
     
  12. mpetersrx7

    mpetersrx7

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    I should have know you would not have waited this long :) Now get your butt to Round Up.

     
  13. Spook50

    Spook50 Get ready

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    So you have to tap the hard line, or is there a T fitting you can install?
     
  14. euclid

    euclid

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    The temp pickup is a little brass nub with threads on one end. Mine was installed on my new transmission when I got it. It is installed into the transmission oill cooler output line, in the hard line, before it turns into soft line, before it makes the turn. I can take a picture if this isn't clear.


     
  15. Spook50

    Spook50 Get ready

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    That'd be cool, because I'm completely lost. I'm sure it'd be easy to figure out once I crawl underneath and take a look. The local Schuck's carries the 2 1/16" tranny temp gauges, so I'll probably pick one up on Sunday if I get the chance (and look around for a cooler).

    Something else I forgot to ask: what's the pressure of the tranny's cooling system? I would figure not too high, since you were able to use band clamps on the lines.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2006
  16. euclid

    euclid

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    It'l make sense when you get under there.

    The transmission isn't under a whole lot of pressure, but 280 degrees isn't all that uncommon with a big load, especially in the hills. You want a hose that will handle that heat on a daily basis.
     
  17. mmw68

    mmw68 CruiserCrap.com - pimping crap for your cruiser!

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    Following Greg write up a few months ago, I also added a Tranny Cooler, and like Greg suggested, I routed it thru the radiator as well.

    I used some Blue high presure hose I picked up all the fitting at a local hot rod speed shop.

    Maybe my pictures could be useful.

    The fittings are:

    14mm x .15x6 (Blue fitting with oring)

    6 x 90 degree bend fitting with hose lock nipple on the end.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Spook50

    Spook50 Get ready

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    I take it you only used one of each fitting? Looks like a pretty good idea. That hose holds up to the heat pretty well I take it?
     
  19. mmw68

    mmw68 CruiserCrap.com - pimping crap for your cruiser!

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    Spook, yes I just used the fittings to come off the radiator. The hose is very high presure and made for heat - used in drag racing, and with the AN fittings, no clamps are needed to place the hose on the fitting. It's over kill.

    If you take the JEGS racing catalog, they also carry these fittings and hoses.
    I ordered the factory fittings from cruiserparts.net, but when I found the AN fittings, I just decided to use them instead. They swivel, which is very cool.

    Look at Gregs diagram - then things begin to make sence. :)
     
  20. WckedMidas

    WckedMidas

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    I have a quaestion reguarding running the trans fluid threw original radiator then to the new cooler.
    Wouldnt the stock radiator increase the heat of the trans fluid. Beins its running threw the rad thats cooling the motor? Why wouldnt it be better to eliminate the radiator and run lines straight to aafter market cooler?
     
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