Engine Removal

Joined
Dec 7, 2002
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I would appreciate a general overview on engine removal for a 2-F engine from a 1986 FJ60. I recently bought a nice, straight vehicle with no rust here in Montana. Unfortunately, the #4 cylinder has no compression, there is oil in the air cleaner, and it looks like a bad piston. I am thinking about pulling the engine myself; I have done this on a 1976 FJ40. Do in have to remove the transmission and transfer case with the engine as I did with the FJ40? How much stuff do I need to remove in front of the engine? Radiator I am sure, how much of the grill?
 
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Good question. I was just trying to find this information on the list searching but is not very clear.

Can you just unbolt the engine from the transmission so you don't have to remove the transmission?
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2003
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You don't need to remove the transmission, but it must be supported some way because it has only one mount to the crossmember - the engine acts at the front mount so without it the tranny can tip forward and damage the cross member rubber mount.
 
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Heartworm said:
How much stuff do I need to remove in front of the engine? Radiator I am sure, how much of the grill?
Radiatior, and then the upper boddy crossmeber and grill. This will give you a nice notch to pull the motor through.
 
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Thanks for the information. After slinging the 1100-1200lbs of engine/transmission/transfer case on my FJ40, I would opt to try the engine only method. How difficult is the access to the bolts? How hard is it to get the transmission shaft back in the clutch and flywheel.. I have the alignment tool that I used on the FJ40 when I put a new clutch in it. Will it work on an FJ60?
 
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Heartworm said:
Thanks for the information. After slinging the 1100-1200lbs of engine/transmission/transfer case on my FJ40, I would opt to try the engine only method. How difficult is the access to the bolts? How hard is it to get the transmission shaft back in the clutch and flywheel.. I have the alignment tool that I used on the FJ40 when I put a new clutch in it. Will it work on an FJ60?
Getting to the bolts isn't too hard and I'd say that it's easier to stab the tranny with the engine on a hoist than trying to wrestle the tranny whil working under the rig.
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2004
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Rockville, MD
Bolts are easy to get to. There are 4 of them at the back of bellhousing where it mounts to the tranny. Hardest part is lifting that TALL motor out. Double check that your lift can lift it high enough. Pulling the motor is the easiest part of the swap :D and obviously pull the radiator and front "body" stuff or the hood or you'll never get it out.

As far as lining the output shaft from the motor and the tranny, its hard the pilot bushing is a tight fit on the output shaft. Measure the height of the flywheel when you pull the motor and secure the tranny well, that'll help when you put it back.


Have fun and good luck, post questions... easier to "ask" then "find out"

Chris
 

60wag

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Jun 25, 2003
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If its just a bad piston, you can replace it with the block in the truck. A full overhaul on the other hand, pull it. When I did mine, I separated the tranny from the bellhousing to remove it. After doing the eninge and rebuilding the tranny and tranfser, bolted everything together and installed the whole assembly. I think it was easier to install the whole package at once. One thing that really helped was the adjustable load leveler between the hoist and the engine. The balance point is very close to the rear lifting hook with the tranny hanging off the back. Being able to make subtle adjustments to the balance while manuvering the thing in place was nice. Also watch for bumping the oil pan into the front axle. Iv'e seen several trucks with the brake line on the axle flattened from meeting the oil pan.
 
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