Engine kits, ring/bearing size....

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by 74fj40, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. 74fj40

    74fj40

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    Here's a preface to the post, so you don't think we're total idiots.....
    My friend graduated from Wyo Tech in the spring. He dropped by and saw the F engine sitting on the stand. He got all kinda excited and asked if he could take it apart.. He went on to say that if we bought the engine kit, he'd help us put it back together. It was apart in 30 minutes. He moved to Florida 2 days later.

    So, the question is, how do I tell whether to buy normal rings and bearings or oversize? We are not replacing the pistons, but how do I tell whether or not the engine has been overhauled already?

    Any other useful advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks....
     
  2. frenchman

    frenchman

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    here is one advice....change your circle of friends!
     
  3. Poser

    Poser Oh...Durka Durka Durka. s-Moderator Supporting Vendor

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    Didn't you post this same damn story up before???



    Get a machine shop involved, so that you will not be paying for things more than once.


    Measure your bore of the cylinders...


    Measure the bearings....


    Measure the crank.....



    READ A BOOK!!!!


    Do you own a FSM? If not, it would be worth the money invested in one....TRUST US!!!



    :beer:


    oh wait, your like 12 years old.....


    :pepsi:



    Good luck!


    -Steve
     
  4. IDave

    IDave

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    The piston size will be stamped on the piston head. Along with another number. However, you really should measure it. Like Steve says, read the book.
     
  5. Nick the Carpenter

    Nick the Carpenter

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  6. ken_79-fj40

    ken_79-fj40

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    Nice friend. But I must admit it made me laugh. You probably are broke too to top it off. A machine shop is definately the best way to go about it, and probably not too expensive. But when you have no money at all... Get yourself a very accurate dial caliper and get the stock specs from your manual and start measuring.
     
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