electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)

treerootCO

Where are my keys?!
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I have been reading what I can find on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and really haven't found any positive points. Even the articles that are pro ECT, discuss all of the negatives. Patients report all of the side effects of having a grand mal seizure and many have reported permanent damage. Memory loss, loss of basic motor skills, no longer able to perform simple tasks, etc.

Has anyone been through this procedure or know anyone who has?

This procedure is straight out of the 1930s and doctors are looking at this as a breakthrough in treating depression. I cannot believe the medical world even considers this a solution. The antidepressants they currently prescribe are bad enough in my opinion and now this.

I am confused and now I know someone who is thinking ECT is the solution to all their problems.

definition of ECT: The procedure is usually performed on an inpatient basis although maintenance ECT may be performed once a week or so as an outpatient. The patient is required to fast for 8-12 hours prior to treatment. Involved in the administration of ECT are usually a psychiatrist, anesthesiologist, and other supportive medical personnel. The patient is anesthetized with an intravenous injection of a barbiturate or other anesthetic. The muscles are temporarily paralyzed with the drug succinylcholine which prevents the violent jerking motions that used to break bones. The heart rate and other vital signs are monitored throughout the procedure. In bilateral ECT, electrodes are placed above each temple. In unilateral ECT, the electrodes are placed above the temple of one side of the brain and in the middle of the forehead. An electrical current is then passed through the brain, inducing a grand mal seizure. Evidence of the seizure may show in twitching toes, an increased heart rate, clenched fists or a chest heave. Clinically effective seizures generally last from about 30 seconds to just over a minute.







Now...where did I put my keys? :confused:
 
Joined
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If ya don't know, I ain't tellin'
 
 
I was feeling sick I was losing my mind
I heard about these treatments from a good friend of mine
He was always happy smile on his face
He said he had a great time at the place

Peace and love is here to stay
And now I can wake up and face the day
Happy happy happy all the time
Shock treatment, I'm doing fine

Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
I wanna, wanna shock treatment

I was feeling sick I was losing my mind
I heard about these treatments from a good friend of mine
He was always happy smile on his face
He said he had a great time at the place

Peace and love is here to stay
And now I can wake up and face the day
Happy happy happy all the time
Shock treatment, I'm doing fine

Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
Gimme gimme shock treatment
I wanna, wanna shock treatment

:D
 
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I think of ECT as a last ditch approach to intractable, severe endogenous depression, and nothing else has worked. You consider it when you've tried everything else, and the alternative is too bleak to consider. Perhaps they think they've got some special twist on it in some centers. I don't know.
 

treerootCO

Where are my keys?!
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This might be a solution to the Cruiser addiction. :D

Now if I can only figure out why I drool when the doorbell rings :confused:
 
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I would agree with IDave. I have seen people that were severely depressed improve with ECT. These were not your garden variety depressed individuals, they were hospitalized/recently discharged patients. You could see improvement as the treatment went along.

Prior to being involved with the treatment of patients undergoing ECT, I had a very negative opinion of it. After seeing some of the improvements in patients, my opinion changed. It turned some people that were basically catatonic into functional individuals. I am no longer involved with anesthesia for ECT's.

I would consider it a viable option for individuals with severe depression, when appropriate criteria are used.
 
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Bob and Doug Macenzie introduced me to the treatment in that wonderful movie.

Succinylcholine is a trigger for a really bad thing (Malignant Hyperthermia) - but that is rare. I am surprised they use it - hopefully the anest. knows what (s)he is doing. The disorder is failry well known now, but a reaction prior to 1980 or so was most likely fatal.

I always found the "medical" parts of the psychology and psychiatry fields a bit scary. "We don't know how or why they work, but they seem to help." No thanks.
 
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LongIsland60 said:
I always found the "medical" parts of the psychology and psychiatry fields a bit scary. "We don't know how or why they work, but they seem to help." No thanks.
Fortunately, we have functional MRI and PET scans that have done and do show what is going on, both the deficits and the effects of treatment. It isn't all black box anymore.
 
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I think its hilarous that they want to induce a grand mal seize...cause i have a personal freind that takes meds so she DOESN"T have grand mal seizers...but then again she doesn't suffer from depression.

Stew
 
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cruzer said:
I i have a personal freind that takes meds so she DOESN"T have grand mal seizers...but then again she doesn't suffer from depression.

Stew

See, it works! LOL
 
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Landpimp said:
is this what they used in One Flew Over the Cookoo Nest?

A bit different from that. Back in those days, it was not much more scientific than hooking a car battery to someone's brain and seeing what happened.

These days, the amount of power used is far less, and it is delivered a lot more precisely to the area of the brain that they think "needs" it. It is much more advanced these days.

I have talked with patients who love it. Say that after the lithium (which these days is considered last ditch drug due to it's problems with becoming toxic and the long-term organ damage) stopped working, it was the only thing that made them feel any better.

Others hate it, even though they have never had it.

Interestingly enough, in the case of an involuntary hospitalization in the State of Wisconsin (where I attend school) Electroshock Therapy is the only treatment that patients have carte blanche authority to refuse. Period. Don't want to take your meds? They'll get a court order. Don't want electric shock? It's your right under Wisconsin Law.

I don't know what to think of it. I've discussed it with p-docs, and the opinions there are as varied as those of the patients. Everyone does agree however, that it is absolutely last ditch treatment, and that it is lots better than it used to be.

Steve
 
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