electric fan

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I did the "Ford Taurus" conversion in my '67 Mustang before I even knew that was a good fan to use. I just went to the junkyard and looked for the biggest electric fan I could find. Ended up being a Taurus.

Anyway, it works great! Spent $15 for the fan and $30 for a switch that turns it off and on when it gets hot. I just fabricated the plastic myself... some cutting here and there on the shroud and it works great! It is pretty loud though, especially when the car is off...
 

woody

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high current relay required. I believe these babies draw a ton.

"must" make custom mount, "thru rad" stuff tends to act like a plastic saw blade on your radiator and is a VERY bad idea for fans.
 

Gumby

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I have had a number of Tauruses and Sables in the shop this year and I have been looking for 3 wire fans. 2 out of the 5 had them so far. It seems they came with the bigger motor. The 3.0Ls had two wire fans. One of them ended up on the 40, the other on the students' project 350 Astro. I'm running two high amp Bosch relays on each. I fabbed aluminum 1 inch angle brackets to attach it to the aluminum radiator. Couldn't tell you well it cools yet other then it never gets over 200 when it's on during many endless hours of diagnoses.
 
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Did you just attach with cable ties through the fins or did you need to make special brackets?
I drilled holes into the stock rad support and used sheet metal screws to hold it to the rad support.
I am just hoping the shroud doesn't crack where I drilled it.
 
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When I still had my '89 Dodge Cummins I had the electric fan running through a thermostatic switch thresded into the head I got from the local auto parts store and through the battery with a fuse on the hot side. I just selected a thermostatic switch that was 5 - 10 degrees hotter than the thermostat. It only came on when necessary and only as long as necessary. It worked great for me.
 
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Did you just attach with cable ties through the fins or did you need to make special brackets?

Did you need to add a high current relay to power it or was their and existing circuit to tie into?

I used that metal stuff they use to attach pipes (comes in a roll and has holes drilled every inch or so) to attach the fan. I bolted a metal "strap" in all four corners of the fan/shroud and bolted it to my frame and radiator supports.

As for wiring, all I did was run a hot wire directly from the battery to a thermostat switch. Then, from the switch to the fan. I had to use a 30amp fuse in the line though, as a 25 amp fuse kept blowing. My switch has a dial to change the temp at which the fan turns on. I made it a little above 180 so that if I'm driving on the highway, the fan doesn't turn on. Instead it allows the air to cool it off. Mine only comes on while sitting still. &nbsp:Do keep in mind though, that with my set up, the fan does run for a few minutes after you shut the car off. IMO, this is good but others may differ.

Also, I used a two-wire fan from an '89 Taurus.
 

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