electric chain saws

Joined
Nov 6, 2013
Messages
478
I bought an electric Craftsman chainsaw a couple of years ago and used it for some small stuff and then put it one a shelf and didn't touch it until today.
It has a 16" bar and when I got it out checked the bar oil and started cutting.
I also have a 14" 40volt saw I bought about 6 months ago.
That little saw goes through a sizable piece of wood pretty quick.
In 1980 I went off the grid and heated with just wood and then where I am now with wood until two years ago.
All that time it was mess with the chainsaw to get it running for the season and mess with them during the season.
I am sure someone will claim to never have problems with their chainsaws but it was never the case with me.
After I put a furnace in two years ago I planned on never cutting wood again but the power company said I needed to remove some trees on my property that were to close to the transformer.
I don't like cutting live trees and the fact that they were Sassafras made it even harder so rather than let them be ground up I had them leave the trees for me.
I diced up some of it but would like to do something wit the larger pieces rather than just burn it.
Anyone have experience with Sassafras?
Her are some pics of my old ars using the electric chainsaws.
This is the 110V Craftsman
1922585

The 40V from harbor freight
1922586
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,707
Location
US
I've watched several youtube vid reviews of some of the newer cordless saws from major manufacturers and they do look surprisingly impressive in cutting ability. Less so on runtime though.
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2013
Messages
478
Yes run time is restrictive for the battery saw.
I figure half hour of solid cutting before performance starts to drop but any more I am ready to knock off in a half hour and if I do have the desire to keep going there is the 110 plug in as long as I can get the logs with in 25 feet of an out let.
One can find draw backs in just about any thing but what I have liked most about the electric is low noise, no exhaust and the constant torque.
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,707
Location
US
well, I have no direct personal experience with electric saws, but I can see that a corded one would be pretty much useless for my needs. Unless you have a very small place and yet somehow lots of wood, the cord reach limitation is just too big a drawback for me. However, I will say that for a climbing saw, a light tiny battery saw seems very appealing.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2018
Messages
257
Location
Georgia
I bought an Aldi electric chainsaw as an experiment. It is 110 volt and has a 2 or 3 year warranty. It does surprisingly well.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2006
Messages
1,480
Location
Santa Rosa, CA
We have the green pro. the middle size battery. Great for little jobs about the house. It's definitely not for continuous long term cutting, but to take down one small tree to do some branch trimming it's awesome. I have to agree with OP that I've moved away from all small gas motors - they all go bad and then I have to drop them off, pick them off, pay a lot of money. If I were to buy again, I'd buy the big one. It lacks the torque of gas.
 

e9999

You want to do what...?
Moderator
 
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Messages
16,707
Location
US
I'm not that fond of ICEs in general, I must say. The design is quite clunky in the big picture and not that satisfactory to folks fond of elegant designs I think, in contrast to electric motors. However, having said that, I must add that I'm also stunned at how well ICEs function and how reliable they are. I have at any given time probably close to a dozen little gas engines around the house. In various forms, and may have had close to that many for 20 or 30 years. I have NEVER had to bring one to a repair shop. And I'm no expert on those things, just a regular DIYer. I don't use fancy premixed gas either, just my own run of the mill on the spot mix. And I am in one of those states that impose large amounts of ethanol on their sheep. Only preventive maintenance I do is to empty the tanks before long time storage and clean the air filters every so often. Over the last 20 or 30 years, I may have had to change 3 or 4 gas lines, maybe one fuel filter (not even sure about that). And I don't mean for each, I mean total. I may have squirted some carb cleaner in an intake 2 or 3 times. And futzed with carb screws maybe 2 or 3 times. In over 20 years. That's it. I never had one die on me or one that could not be started. Generally, they all start within less than 5 pulls and for most, within 2 or 3 pulls. Admittedly, I don't use those professionally, just homeowner work. And I don't have crap generic chinese engines. But I can't imagine I'm unusually lucky either.
 
Top Bottom