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Effect of cold weather and block heater on TLC?

Discussion in '80-Series Tech' started by e9999, Mar 10, 2004.

  1. e9999

    e9999 You want to do what...? Moderator

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    hiyall:
    you would assume that trucks that have a block heater would have been exposed to some seriously cold weather.
    All you cold fiends, are there some indicators of potential trouble with engines on trucks that were used in climates necessitating block heaters? Likely failures of parts etc?
    thanks
    E
     
  2. ppc

    ppc M Go Blue

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    Wear of mechanical components in the driveline would not be my primary concern. I would be concerned that it also was in an environment where salt may have been used on the roads causing potential corrosion issues. That would not just be body panels and the like but having nuts and bolts that can’t be removed without breaking.
     
  3. CDN_Cruiser

    CDN_Cruiser

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    I would have to agree. I would say that for the vast majority of people in North America, a Land Cruiser would not have been exposed to any significant degree of extreme cold weather that would be a problem.

    I've lived in one of the coldest places in North America and vehicles did experience cold weather related problems (ie when it was -40C/-40F for three weeks at a time). If you are looking for a truck that has rarely seen, say -20C, then salt is more of a problem than cold.

    Cheers, Hugh
     
  4. Pitbull

    Pitbull

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    I wouldn't think a block heater would cause any problem. Any owner that would install a block heater would normally do this to cut down on engine wear from cold starts. All Dodge Cummins Turbo diesels come with block heaters for just this reason.
     
  5. e9999

    e9999 You want to do what...? Moderator

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    so these stories about blocks freezing over and cracking and all, huge wear, that's all old stuff then, what with new coolants and all (assuming you put the right mixture in) ?
    E
     
  6. ppc

    ppc M Go Blue

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    If they made the effort to install the heater they more than likely used it. That being the case the block would be in good shape. I don't think a block heater was a factory or port installed option.
     
  7. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Moderator

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    Phil is correct , DIO (Dealer Installed Option) only.
     
  8. e9999

    e9999 You want to do what...? Moderator

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    so these cruzah things can operate at subsubsubfreezing temps then?
    E
     
  9. RavenTai

    RavenTai

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  10. Photoman

    Photoman SILVER Star

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    I have block heaters in four vehicles, a tractor, backhoe, dump truck, and the cruiser. The nice thing about block heaters (if you are near electricity) is there is no need to use things like starting fluid. To me this stuff can do a good bit of harm. I have already bent the pushrods in a backhoe when I gave it too much ether trying to start it in very cold weather. Also, if something still won't start and you give it too much ether it will wipe down the cylinder walls making it even harder to get it going. For very cold climates they make a neat heater that runs on fuel like an oil fired boiler.

    http://www.hydro-hot.com/Webasto/webasto_hwy.html

    Since they basically just work on heater hoses, you could install one on your cruiser if so inclined $$$.
    I have camped in my cruiser at -10F in the Yukon when photographing Dahl sheep, and never had a problem with it starting. I guess people in every climate have learned the tricks and special requirements to get things started and keep things running.

    Bill
     
  11. e9999

    e9999 You want to do what...? Moderator

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    I remember reading these stories about the German airfields in Russia during WW2, where they would have to build a fire under the plane engine to get it going. It was either go or go up in flames but that was the only way to get them to fire up (!).
    Imagine the cruzah stuck in the frozen woods with that same choice...
    Yikes!
    E
     
  12. robbie

    robbie Guest

    I personally am a firm believer of a block heater. It helps faster warm up in the morning and less fuel wasted in the winter. I use to use a oil pan heater also in the winter in Alaska when I lived there. Both the block heater and oil pan heater could warm the engine in about 1.5 hours. made less stress on the starter and less wear on the engine. The toyota one that is sold is about 450 watts and is only good if you plug it in over night when the temp is less then 32 F. When working in Prudoe bay AK if you did not plug in your truck when the temps drop below -10 f it would be real hell getting it started. Also diesel trucks were left running all the time after -20 f. The diesel fuel made on the slope for winter conditions was like petrol, if it hit the floor it would evaporate in a little while. later robbie
     
  13. rochestercruisin

    rochestercruisin

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    For what its worth, I have 1995 TLC with 155K on it. It has spent its entire life in South Dakota and Minnesota, without a block heater. So far:

    no rust

    no drips

    no (unusual) wearing

    Seems to me the LC can play ball even in the cold. :)

    Jeff
    Rochester, MN
     
  14. CDN_Cruiser

    CDN_Cruiser

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    [quote author=e9999 link=board=2;threadid=12869;start=msg119270#msg119270 date=1079017971]
    I remember reading these stories about the German airfields in Russia during WW2, where they would have to build a fire under the plane engine to get it going. It was either go or go up in flames but that was the only way to get them to fire up (!).
    Imagine the cruzah stuck in the frozen woods with that same choice...
    [/quote]

    This was standard operating procedure for many cold places in the world. When I lived in the arctic, there were lots of stories of pilots that used to land the plane and then, more commonly, drain the oil into a pan and reheat on a stove or fire to restart the plane after it had been sitting.

    I used to carry a propane 'tiger torch' and a few lengths of stove pipe to restart our cruiser after it had been sitting for a long time in the cold (and not close to power outlet). Even more recently, this January, a friend of mine had to use a camp stove to reheat his oil and battery after an unexpectedly cold weekend camping!

    Cheers, Hugh
     
  15. cruiserdan

    cruiserdan SupportingVendor Emeritus Moderator

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    Ya just gotts ta love the desert, no? ;)