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Drum brake wheel cyls TLC

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by brider, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. brider

    brider

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    Back to the drum brakes.

    I asked this question here before about lubing or not lubing the pistons(the steel parts that push against the brake shoes) within the cylinders. The closest answer I got was to change fluid often to minimize water absorbed into the fluid, thus rusting the cyl walls.

    But my concern is the interface between the steel parts and the steel cyl walls where the brake fluid NEVER TOUCHES. When the brakes are adjusted properly, the little rubber pistons in the cyls move very little, so the majority of the steel piston is in bare contact with the bare steel walls of the cyls. The only seal is the external rubber boot on each end of the cyl, and it's not a great seal.

    So shouldn't I use some anti-sieze or light grease to protect the bare steel sliding surfaces?
     
  2. Poser

    Poser Oh...Durka Durka Durka. s-Moderator Supporting Vendor

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    There really should not be any ‘bare’ steel sliding surfaces exposed, since the rubber boot will keep anything out of that area.

    Lubricate the threads on the adjusters and call it good.
     
  3. splitshot

    splitshot Head cook, Bottle washer, and Peace keeper. SILVER Star

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    I usually put a dab of anti-seaze on them.
     
  4. Gundy

    Gundy

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    I agree with Poser on this. I've never heard of the piston sticking. Perhaps
    this would happen on a poor cruiser that rarely gets driven. ;)
    The adjuster is a different animal. They WILL seize. Anti-seize is a solution.
    I'd guess it wouldn't hurt to grease the "exposed" piston area. I just don't think
    it is needed seeing how it's "booted".
     
  5. John McVicker

    John McVicker SILVER Star

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    Wheel cly. pistons will certainly sieze. But the solution is not to lube the pistons. The solution is to keep the moisture out of the clys. & you do this by changing the fluid regulary (brake bleeding).

    Not unheard of to have to literally remove the pistons w/a wooden dowel once siezed due to rust. Change brake fluids as part of regular pm & you won't need to worry.

    Good luck, John

    Edit: And yes of course, use anti sieze on the adjusters. They can/will also freeze w/o anti sieze.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2007