Driving to Peekaboo Canyon near Kanab, UT (1 Viewer)

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Hi - inexperienced off pavement driver here. Still getting my feet wet. Interested in visiting Peekaboo Canyon for the short hike if I can make it. I'm concerned about the drive through 'deep' sand to get to the trailhead. Sounds like a lot of people getting stuck, including a Taco w/ K02 and other 4WD vehicles (but not sure what kind of tires they had - street tires? Or off-road capable?).

I have a stock '08 with K02s (basically stock 20" profile). Has anybody driven this sand to the trailhead? Will someone inexperienced like me in basically a stock LX with K02's make it with 100% confidence? If there is some measure of risk, even if minimal, I'll avoid. Would CRAWL get me out of trouble here?

Also, there's a sign at the start of the sand road - 4WD only. Not for AWD. Why 4WD and not AWD? What about 4WD would be different than AWD here (sorry for the dumb question)? Would airing down to 25PSI help - it looks the same as when filled to 43PSI (at least visually to me)? Even then, I still probably would avoid - a lot of time and hassle for a 30 minute walk....?


 

grinchy

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Yes, you should air down for sand (assuming you have a way to air up after). If not, consider a basic portable air compressor that hooks up to the battery directly ($40-$150).
4wd vs AWD. There are some videos explaining the difference, try Ronny Dahl's version on youtube. You have a 4wd, just need to lock the center diff.
You should already be carrying a shovel and rescue boards/trax. If not, this is a good reason to justify investing in these tools.
Finally, if you get there, and it looks heinous, don't drive it, particularly solo.
 

kcjaz

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Its hard to advise on trails without having been on the trail yourself or knowing the person you are advising. There is no such thing as zero risk. Really only you can assess what risk you are willing to take. If your risk tolerance is low, or zero, then going solo into deep sand is probably not a good idea. Its good your thinking about it and asking questions. I would suggest getting someone who has some experience to go with you.

I have a mildly built rig with a lift, AT tires, and 17" wheels. I have never driven in sand dunes or any kind of deep sand. In my case, I would know to air down and would also know that I can go to 18 psi without risking losing the bead (your 20" wheels will not be as affective aired down as smaller wheels). I would take a shovel and max trax plus other recovery gear, though I have no winch. I have watched many stuck in sand videos showing how to get out. I would try to get a friend to go with me. From the trail description, I would consider going solo, but I would causiously assess the situation once there before I got into the sand. I would watch other trucks. I might hike in and observe for a while. Finally, I would not go in if I didn't have a good plan and feel comfortable for what I'd do if I got stuck.

All that said. You have a very capable vehicle and it will do things you may not think possible. I strongly recomend finding some friends to ride a few trails with. Doing so will give you a great feel for what your truck can do and more importanlty what you are comfortable with. I did this recently at LCDC and it really opened my eyes as to what is possible in a 200 series LC. Taking some risks and being prepared with a little knowledge usually pays off with experiences worth having.
 
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Thanks guys. Part of my problem is that I have no friends with off-road capable vehicles. I'm interesting in joining some of these groups trips you guys do here but generally can't (I don't think my stock truck could go where you guys go and I just get do the trip (time and/or money limited). Peekaboo might be good for as a nice destination AND getting some experience with sand. But I don't have a lot of recovery gear. I have a compressor (that's still new and I need to test), shovel, some hooks and a static strap. But I don't have winch or traxx (budget limited for how much I would use them at this point).

Peekaboo is probably not a bad place to get stuck, relatively speaking. It's a few mile hike back to pavement; it's not like it's a hundred miles off-road in the desert. Still, I don't want to risk getting stuck. It seems like I should be able to make it, especially airing down a bit (but not sure about real efficacy for 20" 55 profile). But then again, lots of videos of people getting stuck (although seems like 2wd trucks and/or street tires). But the video of the Taco w/ K02 getting stuck multiple times is concerning. So, not sure what to make of it.

I would like to build experience and try things. I'm just very risk averse without buddy recovery being available. I was thinking of maybe following some capable trucks in and then leaving before they do, assuming there is good traffic that day.

So, in the context of the sign, 4wd means locking center diff? But that means I need to be in 4Lo. Is that the right mode for sand? Sounds like I need more studying on when to use 4Lo and center diff. I didn't think they were indicated for sand (more for asymmetrical torque situations).

I'll keep Matt on speed dial - wonder how much it would cost.....
 

grinchy

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You can get recovery boards for $150, or even $75. A name brand is a lot more, but you’ll get a couple uses out of even the cheapest as long as you aren’t bridging, which seems unlikely in sand.
A strap is $40.
You can lock the center diff in 4h. Up to 55 mph.
 
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Just invest in a portable air compressor. If you have never driven on sand, Airing down is night and day difference. An aired up tire digs through the sand and gets you dug into trouble quick. An aired down tire (15-20 PSI) does provide a larger contact patch, but most importantly conformed to the sand and rolls over it instead of dig through it. I'm not sure if 25 PSI is low enough. once you see the lower tire side wall start to get a "belly" ( for lack of a better term) you should be fine.


I have had this compressor for 8-10 years and it has performed just fine for the 3-4 wheeling trips I do per year. There is probably better quality products, but this has been great bang for the buck. Its been great because I have been able to use it on multiple vehicles also.
 
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also invest in some tire deflators. Doing each tire by by hand is a PITA.


I have also had a set of these for the past 10 years and would recommend.
 
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Thanks. I have a viair compressor that I have never tested. I should do that before the trip. But that being said, my tires are 285/55/20 (K02). Not sure how much benefit to expect airing down to 20-ish PSI (and how low I can really go w/ out bead concerns). Thoughts?

Yup, I've got some simple deflators in my cart.
 
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Thanks. I have a viair compressor that I have never tested. I should do that before the trip. But that being said, my tires are 285/55/20 (K02). Not sure how much benefit to expect airing down to 20-ish PSI (and how low I can really go w/ out bead concerns). Thoughts?
I used to go to Glamis sand dunes a lot when I was younger so I have a lot of experience in sand there, unless you are driving erratically, like a serious jack ass, its extremely hard to pop a bead in the sand above 12 psi. I would think it would take higher speed and a hard jerk / steering wheel turn one way to pop a bead. Some jeeps and lighter rigs even go down to 6-8 PSI. Even though you are 20's, 20 psi should be just fine.
 
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PS, I just drove through Kanab 2 times this past weekend. from Bryce Canyon to Horse shoe Bend and then back to Zion. Such a beautiful part of the country. I hadn't planned on stopping there, but I definitely will go back.
 
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I used to go to Glamis sand dunes a lot when I was younger so I have a lot of experience in sand there, unless you are driving erratically, like a serious jack ass, its extremely hard to pop a bead in the sand above 12 psi. I would think it would take higher speed and a hard jerk / steering wheel turn one way to pop a bead. Some jeeps and lighter rigs even go down to 6-8 PSI. Even though you are 20's, 20 psi should be just fine.

Thanks! Good to know.
 
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Hi - inexperienced off pavement driver here. Still getting my feet wet.

If the sand is deep and soft as opposed to packed it is generally best to maintain some speed/momentum.

The Land Rover driving school has an axiom:

"Go as slow as you can, but as fast as you must."

That is good advice not just for sand but pretty much all offroad driving situations. It can keep you from; getting stuck, breaking something and running out of power on a steep climb.

Ease into it a step at a time and have fun.
 
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Thanks! Yes, that does make logical sense. However, without experience, I'm not sure what it really means in practice. For the type of sand and terrain that I'll specifically be facing, give my truck and tires, how do I determine my driving settings? 4 hi or lo (hi?)? Center locked or not (hi, so not locked; if lo is appropriate, then what?)? Tire pressure (keep it stock unless I see other trucks have problems or I get stuck? what's the trigger to lower it)? VSC on or off (guessing off, btw). Then based on all these settings and the sand conditions, what speed? Dumb thoughts I know - this is all probably second nature for you guys. I hope to get there someday. :) It's hard getting experience. No place to go (locally), no time and no money.
 
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Our vehicles are a world apart so I cannot offer specific advice related to the advanced features of yours. My choices are 4Hi or 4Lo, trans gear 1 thru 4, no lockers and skinny tires. I've driven in some sand on the lower end of Medano Pass at the Great Sand Dunes.

If you are going to slow in sand you will feel the car bogging down. Resist the urge to firewall the throttle which will just dig a hole. Instead slowing increase power until you pick up speed.

If you have a compressor I'd air down before getting into the sand. I have to believe that even with a 55 aspect ratio it will increase the footprint.

If this is a popular destination you could get there early, hang around the entrance and ask an individual or group if you can tag along with them.
 

grinchy

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Basic boards are fine. I have a set of Maxsa bought when I got the rig, still fine. I’ve moved on to rototrax which I haven’t had to use in anger yet.
You can lock that center diff in 4H.
Try out your crawl control Before you get stuck so you know how to use it.
 
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Thanks for the tips guys.

4H locking the center diff - I did not know that. I'll try that out; I thought I read 4L only. CRAWL - I need to read the manual again. I forgot when it will engage. I'm not sure how to test it - I've never used it before......
 
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I'm not sure how to test it - I've never used it before...

For the low tech 4WD vehicles it is not recommended to drive on dry pavement with 4WD engaged. It can be hard on drivetrain components. I assume it is the same for yours.

Find a gravel road to do your testing.
 

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