differential/transfer case service cost (1 Viewer)

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I recently switched to a shop to try out future maintenance services for my 2005 LC100 since the existing shop has limited capability as a one-man show. This shop is medium sized family operation with great reviews and reputation for over a decade. I was quoted of about $200 labor+$135 parts/oil since I don't remember when the following service was done. I just wanted to check if the price quoted is not out of line.
-front/rear diff. service
-transfer case service
-transmission drain and fill
 

AlpineAccess

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It's not out of line, but puts their shop rate around $150 an hour. They have likely built in some time for stuck fill/drain plugs and for inspection/diagnostic fees. That to me is a good sign. You don't want an inexperienced shop rushing through this service and you certainly want good fluids going in.

Parts/Oil is just crush washers and gear lube, but good synthetic gear lube is about $10 a quart and takes right around 7 quarts. They've got some mark-up on that as well.

If you DIY this service it should take around 3 hours and cost about $100 including buying a small fluid pump.
 
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Their itemized parts as follows:
gear oil 80w90, 75w90 and OEM fluid from Toyota.
I'm going to call the dealer and ask if it is about the same, I'd rather go to the dealer.
 

AlpineAccess

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Their itemized parts as follows:
gear oil 80w90, 75w90 and OEM fluid from Toyota.
I'm going to call the dealer and ask if it is about the same, I'd rather go to the dealer.

No reason why the dealership would do any better than your independent shop. In fact, at the dealership, often fluid swaps like this are relegated to "lubrication technicians" meaning the newest techs and in some cases...whatever kid they have that isn't busy running cars around the lot. It is absolutely not better to have the dealership do it. Just totally up to you if you have a lot of trust in them.

80w90 SAE is what they would put in the T-case and most likely the open front diff. 75w90 (with LSD modifier) is what goes in the rear LSD.

Being in a cooler climate for a chunk of the year I find that synthetic gear oil (what I can get at my local auto parts place is mostly 75w90 variants) results in quieter operation of my front diffs and T-case when its truly cold out.
 
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You got a point there and I think I'd rather support honest and reliable local shops for their good work, especially during this time.:)
I'm in FL, so it's fairly warm for the most part, although it is nice and really cool right now, so hopefully those grades of oil would work.
 

MJK

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I vote for DIY or Indy service

7qts of M1 75w-90 synthetic gear oil and some crush washers will do your diffs & tcase.

The trans hold 12 qts or more Toyota WS, but you can only get out 3+ with every drain and fill. I buy 12 qts, and drive a few hundred miles between 3 drain/fills.
 

AlpineAccess

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There are multiple options for transmission service on the 100 (one is not recommended but am listing it for reference!)

You can "flush" (not recommended) which is done by machine and power-flushes the system.

You can drain and fill (which ends up replacing 75-80% of the fluid with fresh. This is virtually fool proof, so long as the transmission was at the proper fluid level before the work starts. WHEN COLD, you drain the pan and measure the fluid you drained, then add back in that fluid with fresh stuff that is COLD. Same temp fluid is important, as these fluids expand and contract a lot.

You can "exchange" fluid, which is what many forum members do. There are plenty of threads to read on this service, but in essence: disconnect the output hose on the trans cooler and add an extension, stick that into a drain bucket. Take a long section of hose and run it down into the trans 'fill' hole and put a funnel on it. Turn engine on and use transmission pump to pump out old fluid 2-3 quarts at a time. Add 2-3 quarts back in through the funnel and tube. Then check level using FSM procedure when done (when fluid is coming out into 5 gal bucket clear).
 
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HelthInsXpert

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You got a point there and I think I'd rather support honest and reliable local shops for their good work, especially during this time.:)
I'm in FL, so it's fairly warm for the most part, although it is nice and really cool right now, so hopefully those grades of oil would work.
Where in FL out of curiosity? I need to reseal my Transfer case and I'm not sure if I want/am capable of doing it myself!
 

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