Delo 400 & Delo 400 SYN

Joined
Mar 13, 2003
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North Front Range, CO
I see that Delo has a syn oil now.
Is it as good as M1 and RotellaT syn oil?
Anyone use it or know how well it works?
WHere would you buy it?
Is the Delo 400 syn for our 6cyl motors?
On the Delo page it shows the applacation of the oils

Delo 400
• Four-stroke gasoline engines and all naturally-aspirated and turbocharged four-stroke diesel engines using high or low-sulfur fuels

Delo 400 SYN
• Turbocharged diesel and four-stroke gasoline engines

• Torque converters, gear cases, hydraulic systems
 
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May 3, 2003
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S. Lake Tahoe, CA
I have been using delo 400 syn 5-40 in my 98 jetta turbo-diesel since 5k,(it now has 120k). I love it and may use it in the 80, but it is spendy at around $5.00 qt. I get it from the local Chevron jobber (wholesaler). They used to have to order it for me but enough people buy it now that they keep it in stock. It is designed for diesels, and not all the synthetics are.
JonB
 

cary

 
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May 7, 2003
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I believe the Delo 400 is a group IV PAO. There has been very little info that I have seen about it.
 
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Sep 20, 2004
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Reno, NV
cary said:
I believe the Delo 400 is a group IV PAO. There has been very little info that I have seen about it.

I used the regular delo 400 in my PSD and seems to do real well.

I can't keep track of the synthethic groups, so is the IV PAO a good thing or is it one of the kinda sorta sythethics or is it a true synthetic?
 

cary

 
Joined
May 7, 2003
Messages
3,136
Group IV PAO is the good stuff. Group III Hydrocracked is the sorth of synth. Still works well, but costs less to make and should be priced lower (Ala Shell Rotella Synth 5w-40). The Delo 15w-40 you are using is a great (best possibly) mineral oil as long as temps are above 30-40f. Lower temps and you should be using a 0w-xx or 5w-xx oil.
 

tarbe

 
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Aug 6, 2004
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Houston, Texas for now - Romance, MO soon!
locrwln 1

It is helpful to think of a barrel of crude as a mixture of widely varying molecules...straight chain, branched, ringed...and widely different molecular weights - kinda like a soup. The more refining and distilling you do, the more impurities you remove (sulphur and nitrogen, among others) and the fractions become more uniform as to molecular weight and boiling point. Groups 1 through 3 basestocks are essentially differentiated by the degree of refining of the crude oil.

Group IV basestocks (Olefins) are purpose built molecules (we make them from coal, but you could make them from other hydrocarbons). If you buy a pound of say C-12 olefin, 99+% of the molecules are going to be the same. This consistency allows you to tailor the properites of the finished product to more excactly suit your needs. You don't end up with a large percentage of molecules "on the wings" as we say...ie either lighter or heavier than you really want.

It is not uncommon for oils to be made with several different basestocks, as well. Poly-alphaolefins are finding their way into more oils these days than just straight group IV oils. That is good for the guys that make their house payments selling olefins!
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2004
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Reno, NV
tarbe said:
locrwln 1

It is helpful to think of a barrel of crude as a mixture of widely varying molecules...straight chain, branched, ringed...and widely different molecular weights - kinda like a soup. The more refining and distilling you do, the more impurities you remove (sulphur and nitrogen, among others) and the fractions become more uniform as to molecular weight and boiling point. Groups 1 through 3 basestocks are essentially differentiated by the degree of refining of the crude oil.

Group IV basestocks (Olefins) are purpose built molecules (we make them from coal, but you could make them from other hydrocarbons). If you buy a pound of say C-12 olefin, 99+% of the molecules are going to be the same. This consistency allows you to tailor the properites of the finished product to more excactly suit your needs. You don't end up with a large percentage of molecules "on the wings" as we say...ie either lighter or heavier than you really want.

It is not uncommon for oils to be made with several different basestocks, as well. Poly-alphaolefins are finding their way into more oils these days than just straight group IV oils. That is good for the guys that make their house payments selling olefins!
Cool, I just love learning about all of this stuff.
 
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