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Crank pulley, Can it be powder coated?

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by AATLAS1X, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. AATLAS1X

    AATLAS1X

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    I have been told about horror stories about these being powder coated and they just fall apart.

    True or false?

    I dont want to try with my A/C P/S 3 groove...............


    Advise please....................


    Thanks,

    Shane
     
  2. KLF

    KLF Frame waxer SILVER Star

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    I don't have any direct experience with this, but I can believe it. There is a dense rubber dampener inside the pulley, between the shieves and the center hub part. I would bet it would not take the heat from the curing oven.
     
  3. Waorani

    Waorani

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    I was wondering the same thing last night before I realized how it was made. I heat parts to 450F until the powder flows and I don't think I want to do that with a part with rubber in it.
     
  4. AATLAS1X

    AATLAS1X

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    My powder is set up for 400 degrees....


    Anyone have an idea?
     
  5. 890man

    890man

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    I would say don't do it. I'm not sure what material they use, but I bet it wont hold up well to heat. I am an injection molder working with plastics every day. We run all typs of material including some rubber jobs. The material we use is a TPE (Thermoplastic Elastomer) The process (melt) temps range between 365 F up to 450 F, but most of them fall in the lower range. This assumes it is a TPE. They do begin to melt at lower temps though. Don't bake these at 400, you will ruin them. There are a lot more materials and grades that can handle higher temps, but I would just stay safe. Use a good epoxy paint or POR-15 or some of the others out there. I dont know the manufacturing process but the chrome, powder or other finishing is most likley done before adding the dampening material.
     
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