clinometer

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My will power threshold is low today. First paid app for my Android phone is Roll Me Over. Clinometer, compass, GPS location and altitude. All in one display! ...and with a Land Cruiser icon showing the tilt. $1.50
 
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Back in the day, I had one very similar to this mounted on the dash of my 40...
ImageUploadedByIH8MUD Forum1411512791.267667.jpg
 
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I watched a guy messing around once with a 40 on 2-tons testing his flop over angle and he took a section of chain and went around the sliders, tied the chain off to a 33,000lb forklift and pick the 40 up until it tipped over and was caught by the chain so it didn't cause damage. I was amazed at how far it actually went.
 
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I got one like that right now and it works great! Same as the ones on my sailboats! Cost about $12 I think, got it from Hamilton Marine.

But then I hate electronic stuff, I've historically had really bad luck with electronics...

...but my app only cost $1.50 (plus the $400 phone, $12 mount, etc.) and if my battery dies, so does the app
(and I have no phone.)
 

2MinutesTurkish

it was two minutes, five minutes ago...
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I know these look cool but when I think about the physics involved in a rollover, I can't understand why this would be a good tool.

Maybe someone can enlighten me. Genuinely interested.

Seems like static incline is much less important than understanding weight transfer on a certain line...
 
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I don't get on the trail as much as I'd like. Seeing a gauge say I'm at 15-20 degrees side hill helps me past my initial pucker factor, and reminds me I still have some before I dump it on it's side. (Of course that margin can disappear in a moment, when you touch a new rock, slip a down hill tire off something, etc.) I've also found it interesting to know how steep a given hill is. Different tires, dusty or wet trail, air pressure, etc all play a roll in what you can climb. Sometimes it's also nice to know how steep.
 
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Although I had the same device pictured by the OP in my last two 4x4's,I doubt I looked at it more than a dozen times in a similar number of years. (I used up all the fun in my last two trucks, so I stripped them for parts. The gauge was one of the treasures I took from the broken vehicles.) The only places I recall looking at the gauge were:
1) The top of "5 Fingers" hill climb at Hollister Hills SVRA (around 30 degrees)
2) Where I stopped driving up the competition hill climb at Hollister (just over 30 degrees)
3) A (side hill) parking space in San Francisco, where I was pretty sure I was going to roll my lifted, top heavy 4x4. (It turns out I just wasn't in a "she can take it" state of mind. The street was less than 15 degrees, and I was just being a scared little princess.)
 
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...so I think the OP got his reply that they don't get used much, even by the gadget kids that buy them. To reply to the question on placement; that's (where shown in the first post) where I had planned to put mine. It blocks the flow from the A/C a bit. That's more important for people in the back seats. My truck only needs A/C for the front. (I've been thinking of removing all the rear seats.)
 

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