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Cheap tricks

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by FLFJ40, Jul 28, 2005.

  1. FLFJ40

    FLFJ40

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    I was thinking we could start a thread with cheap tricks that we have learned through the years.

    You can use valve grinding compound to clean up threads if you don't have a tap to fit. Coat the bolt with the grinding gompund and run it in and out a few times.
     
  2. Bennett

    Bennett

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    if you are losing coolant or water and think you might havea a blown headgasket ... take your rig down to the local emissions station and have them give you a free sniff of your cooling system for hydrocarbons in the system( coolant/water) . Kind of nice to know before you pull a head. It will show more than a trace btw.
     
  3. PUPTLAM

    PUPTLAM

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    Small hole in the radiator? Add some ground black pepper to get you through the weekend. Broken fan belt and stuck on the trail? Your wifes pantyhose will get you to a parts store.
    This is a very good thread and I hope it really takes off. Every mechanic can stand to learn a little something more.
     
  4. HawkDriver

    HawkDriver

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    Crankshaft Pilot bearing removal tool: take a bolt almost the same size as the hole, make a little lip in the end to get behind the bearing, set a spacer between the prybar and the prying surface for max pressure and voila, it pops right out with out buying the special tools like slide hammers or pullers that can break easily.

    Easily remove a broken bolt: A nut makes the perfect tool, just weld inside the nut's hole to the broken bolt then you have a nice new nut to turn that biatch right out. By far one of the most headache and time saving trick I've ever used. Once spent 3 days on a Tstat housing bolt before I learned that trick. Not it's what 4 minutes. Ha!!

    In order to prevent having stripped phillips head screws on stubborn screws: Get a speed handle, get a nice bit on the end via a 1/4 in socket. Put all of your weight against it or as much pressure as you can then use little controlled bursts and do not allow it to strip any. A few nice pops on em and again, voila easily comes out.

    For electrical work: Stop and look for heatshrink tubing in that aisle. Put your butt connections on then slide it over the conn and heat it and it looks pro and will never come apart or get wet. I love that stuff.

    Stubborn bolts or tie rod ends: Turn your castellated nut around and run it down flush with the bolt and commence to whacking. The nut will protect and retap the threads on it's way off and now you don't have a bunch of crappy threads to clean up.

    Turning tie rods during nut removal: Apply tons of pressure forcing it back into it's cone will usually allow you to get the nut off.

    Cool thread, again. I'll think of more.

    Suspected vacuum leak: Spray starter fluid, brake clean, friggin hair spray around the carb til you locate the prob.

    Common sense but hey: Use brake cleaner and remove all oily residue on gasket surfaces for good leak proof seals.

    Bailing wire, zip ties and duct tape can fix almost anything on a trail breakdown. Keep it in perspective.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2005
  5. Ethan

    Ethan

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    Head light switches are serviceable (at least fj40), if you have a problem with yours take it apart and clean it with electrical contact cleaner or even brake cleaner. Might save you some money or at least get you home on a dark night. to take them apart just bend the tabs holding the bottom (where the wires connect to)

    Try the vinyl spray paint on your old dash pads to make them look new or at least not faded gray.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2005
  6. andrewfarmer

    andrewfarmer

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    If your starter or alternator stop working - hit them with a hammer.
    (will often shift the worn out brushes enough to get you home)
     
  7. dustin

    dustin

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    punching holes through gaskets-
    old spend bullet casing to punch holes in gaskets. the larger the caliber, the larger the hole..

    cleaning grease off stuff-
    oven cleaner works wonders on thick grease like on your steering knuckles. keep it away from rims and other painted items though.

    trail trash bags-
    Some prefer canvase gunnie sacks to hang off the back of the rig for extended wheeling trips. Gunnie sacks are hard to come by in my parts, but I found that a thick cotton laundry bags work well. They have a hooked metal ring at the opening to keep the mouth easy to access, stout, cheap. Some come in a netting, which is good for cans.

    stickers-
    use a hair dryer or heat gun to remove stickers from plyable surfaces, like your dash.
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2005
  8. PUPTLAM

    PUPTLAM

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    PB Blaster is your friend. Use a lot and use it often.

    Never clean an electrical part with alcohol and then try to install it. I spent an hour trying to read out a headlight switch. ALCOHOL CONDUCTS ELECTRICITY!!! Use WD-40. P.S. my buddy who was helping me was pissed when he figured out what I had done.

    If you ever feel the need to put a sticker on your truck, spray the area with window cleaner first. It will allow you to slide the sticker into just the right spot.
     
  9. norm

    norm

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    Use a small ball peen hammer to cut out gaskets. Turn the part upside down, lay the gasket material over the part, and tap around the edges with the hammer. Use the ball side of the hammer to cut/punch the bolt holes.

    Don't hit gear reduction starters with a hammer, you can break the permanent magnets.

    Tire plug kits are great off road, if you can plug the tire before it goes completely flat, you may not need to change it at all.

    If your radiator gets damaged off road, just pinch off the damaged tubes and add some bars leak.

    Cramolin contact cleaner/lubricant works great on lock tumblers.
     
  10. haystax

    haystax

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    Self drilling/tapping screws with rubber washer fix almost anything that leaks - tires, radiators, gas tanks - might not be a cure but a great bandaid.
     
  11. madoc1

    madoc1

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    i love hays thinking
     
  12. peesalot

    peesalot

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    5/8 and a ballpeen.....
     
  13. Texican

    Texican s-Moderator

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    Pull a couple of studs out of a junk axle, the ones that hold the 3rd or the cover.....cut a slot for a flat blade screwdriver, next time you have the spindles, off servicing the birfs etc. you use these, and can stack the dust cover, spindle and seal, on them, start some of the bolts then remove them......
     
  14. Fireman

    Fireman SILVER Star

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  15. camcruiser13

    camcruiser13

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    hole in the radiator add an egg will fill the hole ( small hole that is)
     
  16. Plowboy

    Plowboy

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    quicktie and #10 wire connector, put it where you need it!
    kwicktie front.jpg
     
  17. fjbj40

    fjbj40

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    big hole in rad trick ;) ....squeeze tube with pliers...add a couple of eggs :eek: ..pepper optional...it will stop a fairly large leak...I have done this...when you arrive to your destination people will think you are cooking breakfast :cheers:
    Daryl
     
  18. chief

    chief

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    Another easy way to remove a pilot bearing is to pack it with grease just cram it in until it won't take any more then insert a tight fitting rod or bolt and hit it with a hammer . hydralic pressure will force the bearing out easy as pie

    J B Weld can save the day

    Old inner tubes especially bicycle ones can do anything a bungee cord can in case something comes loose and can also slow a hose leak if necessary

    You can't leave the shed without baling wire and duct tape

    You can stuff a ripped tire with weeds and brush at least enough to get home
     
  19. HawkDriver

    HawkDriver

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    I forgot about that one, I think I used it once. Thanks.

    Plowboy that's sweet man, you think of that?
     
  20. Plowboy

    Plowboy

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    quicktie and wire end was a ripoff of a quicktie product, tie with plastic ring on the end. Mine is cheaper to make and you can move the ring anyplace on the tie you choose and then crimp. Here are two of my own ideas. VCR boxes, free from blockbuster(they throw away hundreds of these a month) small tool organizers and nut driver hole punches. Buy cheap drivers or use one that the handle has come loose, drill out the center and sharpen the outer edge on a grinder. Hole sizes range from 3/16 to 1/2
    cheap1.jpg cheap2.jpg