Changing front and rear brake pads

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Has anyone written a 'How To' on changing the front and rear brake pads on a 100 series?

I was able to find articles on bleeding brake fluid etc, but I wasn't able to find anything specific to changing the front and rear pads.

I'm doing this project this weekend and would very much appreciate any help you can provide.

For anyone else trying to do this, just downloaded a couple sections from the 2002 Lexus LX470 Repair Manual:

- Rear Brake Pad Replacement

- Rear Brake Pad Components

Do I need to use anti-seize compound on the wheel lug nuts or other brake system bolts?

Do I need to use Loctite on any brake system bolts?
 

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hoser

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The given torque specification for lug nuts is for no anti-seize compound. I hae never used AS compound on my brake components and the FSM doesn't say to use it either.
 

Trunk Monkey

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I would use semi-permanent Loctite on the caliper bolts. I know of 4 trucks (mine included) that had a caliper bolt back out and mayhem ensue when the brakes were applied.

The fronts are painfully easy - Toyota's design of the caliper is awesome here. You don't even have to remove the caliper, just pop out the holders in the "window" on the back of the caliper, slide out old pads, press in pistons, and slide in new pads. I usually pull the cap off the brake fluid reservoir when I'm pushing the pistons back in, makes for easy going. Just remember to put the cap back when you're done.
 
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Thanks very much for the advice so far. I decided not to use anti-seize compound on the wheel lug nuts. I used Loctite Blue (rated up to 300 degrees F) on the caliper bolts. Possibly I should have used Loctite Red, which is rated to a high temp?

I have an additional question:

On my 100-series (2002 LX470), I'm using PBR (D1365 RU) ceramic front brake pads:

MAF PBR Ultimate Ceramic Brake Pads

These PBR pads have an integral anti-squeal Shim.

Therefore, I don't think I need to re-install the original Anti-squeal Shim?

If I don't re-install the Anti-squeal shim, do I need to re-install the original "Pad Retainer" and "Pad Retainer Clip" ? (See attached drawing from the factory repair manual.)

The new PBR pads are held in place by the two pins, of course, and they fit fine without the original retainer/clip. So, it seems like I might not need ro re-install the original retainer/clip...

Can anyone confirm?
 

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hoser

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Just FYI, often the anti-squeal shim also acts as a thermal barrier. But as you said, your pads have some sort of shim integrated into it.
 

Trunk Monkey

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Yes, you need the pad retainers, they keep the pad seated in the caliper. As for the Loctite, red is permanent, blue is semi-permanent. It's not the heat rating you're after, it's if you'll ever be able to break the bolt loose again.
 
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I just changed out the front pads. Very easy, this would be a good first DIY project.

I did not remove the caliper. Much easier with it in place.

To push in the pistons I left the old pads in place, cracked the bleed valve (10mm) and attached a hose into a brake bleed jar (empty water bottle would work). I then used a large pair of vice grips on the old pad and the caliper to push the pistons back (this took a while to figure out and made things much easier). Slow steady pressure made them easy to push back in.

When removing the pad use the exposed holes (the extra "why are they there" holes) on the pad to slide in a screwdriver handle and pry gently out. you do not need to remove the pad retainer at all (it is clipped into the piston heads) but if it comes out put it back in. Prep new pads with anti-squeal shims cleaned and installed with a bit of Disc break grease (Permatex small packet $.99- one is enough for both fronts). Slid the pads in with no problem and put it back together. I lightly greased the caliper pins in the area of pad travel. Refilled Master Cylinder and will bed in the morning.

Two hours with some delay for rain and time trying to figure out how to do things. I could do it in under an hour easy now.
 

Trunk Monkey

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Just pull the cap off the master cylinder when you push the pistons in, easier than the bleed valve and no need to refill.
 
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I just did my fronts and did as Truck said, remove the cap and watch the level as you press in the pistons. I used the old pads and then wedged in a large screwdriver against the old pad.

There is nothing but pad, all incorporated into one piece.

I used Toyota original pads and did not have to remove or replace fluid, it came back to full after pumping the brakes about 30 times.
 
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The safest way to compress the piston is with a long flat bar or screwdriver and a large C-clamp. The compression is slow and even that way. I don't know the tolerances on the new calipers, but 30 years ago if you did not compress it evenly, it would jam and scar the inside. It also helps the rubber seal to fold in evenly.
 
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The safest way to compress the piston is with a long flat bar or screwdriver and a large C-clamp. The compression is slow and even that way. I don't know the tolerances on the new calipers, but 30 years ago if you did not compress it evenly, it would jam and scar the inside. It also helps the rubber seal to fold in evenly.
This sounds like a good way to go but I don't think Toyota is too worried about how it's done. The instructions with my OEM pads said to use a wrench handle. :)

Just pull the cap off the master cylinder when you push the pistons in, easier than the bleed valve and no need to refill.
But then I'd have to pay a dealer for a $200 brake flush. I'm just doing $200 more work. :D

Took about 16 oz of new fluid to fill. I forgot how well these trucks stop from 70-0. New pads are all bedded in and brakes like a champ.
 
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