carb/manifold insulator plate

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Oct 13, 2013
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I am replacing a Weber carb with the original Toyota carb on my 1984 FJ60 Land Cruiser. I am replacing the carb/manifold insulator plate and noticed that a new looks like it comes standard with gaskets already in place. Do I need to add a gasket top and bottom and should I use a gasket sealer like Permatex or similar?
Insulator Plate.png
 

Dizzy

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Dry gaskets, no sealant. I don't know if you need one or two of them. I like using washers and fresh lockwashers with the M8x1.25 nuts. Keep a magnetic pickup tool nearby, as it seems like any carb work has me on my hands and knees looking for fugitive hardware.
 

Steamer

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Gaskets are built in/bonded on. Dry and no sealant will give them a long life even with multiple off and on scenarios.
And I don't think I'm the only one that when not knowing better, attempted to scrape them off to replace and discovered just how well they are bonded on there.
 
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Thanks guys I appreciate the feedback. One follow-up question I see where the choke cable attaches on the card but I do not see where the cable get clamped/secured. Not sure if that makes sense?
 
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As it relates to replacing the Weber with a Toyota carb, can you tell me where the hoses go in the attached photo (Car hose 1)? The Land Cruiser had already been de-smogged before I bought it I am not able to trace the old hoses. I've looked at the component layout and schematic drawing and found it very confusing. With the other photo (Carb hose 2) the hose was inserted into the Weber Air Filter, where would it go with the Toyota Carb - I assume in the air filter somewhere.

Carb hose 1.jpg


Carb hose 2.jpg
 

Dizzy

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Clean air to the valve cover, so, there is a barb on the back of the air cleaner assembly that will do what the old Weber barb did.

The rest of that, cap it, for lack of better understanding. The best (not so fast to crack, and not so catastrophic when it shows cracks) caps are sections of fuel or vac line, with the smooth bit of a screw (under its head) chopped off and inserted in the end of the line.
 
Joined
Oct 13, 2013
Messages
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Location
Houston
Clean air to the valve cover, so, there is a barb on the back of the air cleaner assembly that will do what the old Weber barb did.

The rest of that, cap it, for lack of better understanding. The best (not so fast to crack, and not so catastrophic when it shows cracks) caps are sections of fuel or vac line, with the smooth bit of a screw (under its head) chopped off and inserted in the end of the line.
Thanks for the help. Could you expand on your second point - I do not fully understand this part: "The best (not so fast to crack, and not so catastrophic when it shows cracks) caps are sections of fuel or vac line, with the smooth bit of a screw (under its head) chopped off and inserted in the end of the line."
 

Dizzy

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Currently, I have a return fuel line plugged on my rig. I used a 5/16 or 8mm section of screw, cut off on the bench vice, with a cut-off wheel on a grinder, to make the plug. Then a short section of fuel line with a couple of hose clamps.

Here is my EGR vac cap. It is the head of a allen head cap screw 10mm (which has a 16mm OD hex head), inserted into the EGR barb (about 16mm), a section of PCV line goes over the carb barb, and just the screw head, then a couple of hose clamps.

EGR Plug.JPG


EGR Plug2.JPG
 

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