Can we go tubeless? Dunlop SP Qualifier 7.5 r16 mystery (1 Viewer)

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I picked up five Dunlop SP Qualifier 7.5 r16 new take off wheels today for my BJ75. They are mounted on split rims for a 79 series, so the lug pattern doesn’t work and split rims are not ideal.

My plan was to remove the tires and install them on my steel wheels, taking off the BFGoodrich tires that are on there currently. My other truck needs new tires, so this is the only reason that they are coming off.

Am I right to think I can mount these tires on my steel wheels without tubes? I see images of Dunlop SP Qualifier 7.5 r16 with sidewall writing that states TUBELESS, but these do not. @WarDamnEagle, got any hunches?

Do these specific tires need tubes, or do they only need tubes when installed on split rims? If they do need tubes, can I just install tubes with my steel wheels? Or can I only use these tires with tubes on a split rim?

See photo of my current tubeless wheel and tire combo, and photo of the replacement Dunlop SP Qualifer 7.5 r16

1C6D4D10-2259-43C6-A08A-F9835C4E7AA0.jpeg


A0895CC0-D4EA-4EAE-9E67-D357BCA738AC.jpeg
 
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I don't profess to be an expert on this subject but I'll share my thoughts. These SP Qualifiers come in a few different flavors and in Saudi you can get them made in Japan or Made in China. Made in Japan are a lot more expensive. In addition they are tubeless or "Tube Type". Mine have "Tube Type" written on the sidewall and I would assume yours should as well given they are mounted on splits.

I would think that you could run the tires with tubes on your steel rims without issue but I don't know if you can run them tubeless. However, if you try one tubeless and it holds air then I can't think of a reason why you shouldn't run them that way. Not sure if that helps or not.

@Honger might have some additional thoughts/information on the subject.


189CD2A2-DD80-493C-A6DB-2E553891A99C.jpeg
 

Honger

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I don't profess to be an expert on this subject but I'll share my thoughts. These SP Qualifiers come in a few different flavors and in Saudi you can get them made in Japan or Made in China. Made in Japan are a lot more expensive. In addition they are tubeless or "Tube Type". Mine have "Tube Type" written on the sidewall and I would assume yours should as well given they are mounted on splits.

I would think that you could run the tires with tubes on your steel rims without issue but I don't know if you can run them tubeless. However, if you try one tubeless and it holds air then I can't think of a reason why you shouldn't run them that way. Not sure if that helps or not.

@Honger might have some additional thoughts/information on the subject.


View attachment 2626620
Huh... this is curious. A quick internet search says "no" you can't run these "tube type" tires without a tube. The structure of the tire carcass is likely different... relaying on the tube's pressure. They may also have a porosity to them that a tubeless tire doesn't have.
 
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Do these specific tires need tubes, or do they only need tubes when installed on split rims? If they do need tubes, can I just install tubes with my steel wheels?
I wouldn't mount them to any rim. Those types of tyres sell cheap because no one wants the harsh ride from those tyres and split rims Are they rag or steel belted? Usually the rag tyres need a tube.
 
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I wouldn't mount them to any rim. Those types of tyres sell cheap because no one wants the harsh ride from those tyres and split rims Are they rag or steel belted? Usually the rag tyres need a tube.
I have worn out a set of these tube types tires , on tubless rims .
The main difference between tube vs tubless tires is that the latter have a coat of butile inside that is not air porus .
Other then that the tire ru s fine , with no issues .
Loss of air during time , minimal , maybe pump them up 1-2 times a year .
 

Squash

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Ran those on my BJ70 and M101CDN trailer from Ontario to NWT, Yukon and Alaska.
Not one issue. Tubeless on 6 tires as one spare fit both trailer and Yota.
Mine were Japanese made originally on split rims from the 79's.
Great for driving since they were free!
20190507_214101.jpg
 
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Ran those on my BJ70 and M101CDN trailer from Ontario to NWT, Yukon and Alaska.
Not one issue. Tubeless on 6 tires as one spare fit both trailer and Yota.
Mine were Japanese made originally on split rims from the 79's.
Great for driving since they were free!View attachment 2626674

Got any photos? That is an exciting prospect if indeed it was safe and held air!
 
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Huh... this is curious. A quick internet search says "no" you can't run these "tube type" tires without a tube. The structure of the tire carcass is likely different... relaying on the tube's pressure. They may also have a porosity to them that a tubeless tire doesn't have.

Can you show me where you found this information?
 
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I have worn out a set of these tube types tires , on tubless rims .
The main difference between tube vs tubless tires is that the latter have a coat of butile inside that is not air porus .
Other then that the tire ru s fine , with no issues .
Loss of air during time , minimal , maybe pump them up 1-2 times a year .
When you say “these tube type tires”, which exact tires were you using?
 
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I wouldn't mount them to any rim. Those types of tyres sell cheap because no one wants the harsh ride from those tyres and split rims Are they rag or steel belted? Usually the rag tyres need a tube.
I have read positive reviews of their ride quality. These are steel belted radials
 
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I don't profess to be an expert on this subject but I'll share my thoughts. These SP Qualifiers come in a few different flavors and in Saudi you can get them made in Japan or Made in China. Made in Japan are a lot more expensive. In addition they are tubeless or "Tube Type". Mine have "Tube Type" written on the sidewall and I would assume yours should as well given they are mounted on splits.

I would think that you could run the tires with tubes on your steel rims without issue but I don't know if you can run them tubeless. However, if you try one tubeless and it holds air then I can't think of a reason why you shouldn't run them that way. Not sure if that helps or not.

@Honger might have some additional thoughts/information on the subject.


View attachment 2626620

These are made in Japan. I have no problem running a tube inside of the tire with the steel wheel *IF* that is possible and safe. I can also install one with a tube and one without and see if there is any loss of air in either over a week.

when I bought my BJ 75, it had 16 inch split rims and tubes installed. I walked away from the split rims entirely because on my drive home, I got two flat tires from 18+ hours of continuous driving on the highway. I am not sure whether the tubes were installed incorrectly or if the tubes were old, but they deflated the tire and the tires got destroyed. I would like to avoid this at all costs, but then again I am driving the truck mostly on back roads now a days
 
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Are these tires marked "tube type" on the sidewall? Just curious.
Yes, they are marked tube type.

I do have the original 6 lug 16" split rims in the barn, which I can run with these Dunlops if they require both tubes and split rims to be safe. I only want to set them up in a way that is safe. I ain't got much appetite for a spontaneous rollover while out getting ice cream with my wife

IMG_9611.JPG
 
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Two local tire shops that service commercial and light duty vehicles tell me that tube tires cannot be seated on tubeless tires for two reasons:

1. the angle of the beads for tubeless tires and tube tires are different. A tubeless tire has a pliable bead and the tube tire is much less, so installation of a tube tire on a single piece wheel will be very difficult.

2. the tube will not sit correctly in the single piece wheel because of the location of the valve stem

I am therefore led to believe that you do not want to mix and match tube and tubeless tires with single and multipiece (split rim) wheels. One could run a tube tire on a single piece wheel without a tube as some have described above. But, it could be dangerous, and it could lose air over time.
 
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Short answer is no.

You will have leaks running tube tire on tubeless wheels. When I worked Discount Tire, we did this for a customer and he came back with flat tires (all four). The only way to fix it and make it work was lots and lots of bead sealer (a black rubber-type paste that you brush on) between the bead and the rim flange. I pity the person who had to clean the wheel up for the next set of new tires.
 
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as mentioned, for various reasons tube type tires are not meant to be run tubeless, and most people shouldnt.

this is a topic that has been around for ages, even in the motorcycle world,,,, the general consensus among enthusiasts like us is that you CAN run them and it will be fine, you just need to monitor your air pressure and bead/rim inspection often.
 

Squash

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Got any photos? That is an exciting prospect if indeed it was safe and held air!
Still running those tires on both vehicles.
I dare say 20,000kms is a pretty good test of a Dunlop Japanese tire.
Tires are in the above picture.
NOTE: A tubeless tire will generally leak down slowly giving you time to pull over if you are a attentive driver whereas a tube tire fails rapidly.

20190416_142629.jpg


20190419_153133.jpg


20190505_074544.jpg
 
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Two local tire shops that service commercial and light duty vehicles tell me that tube tires cannot be seated on tubeless tires for two reasons:

1. the angle of the beads for tubeless tires and tube tires are different. A tubeless tire has a pliable bead and the tube tire is much less, so installation of a tube tire on a single piece wheel will be very difficult.

2. the tube will not sit correctly in the single piece wheel because of the location of the valve stem

I am therefore led to believe that you do not want to mix and match tube and tubeless tires with single and multipiece (split rim) wheels. One could run a tube tire on a single piece wheel without a tube as some have described above. But, it could be dangerous, and it could lose air over time.
the Angle of the beads is a true fact , but goes back in time at least 30 years ago .....
as said the tube type tires have 1 big difference , the Butile coating .

besides the accademics the true road tests shows that tube type tires are ok on good tubeless rims .
 
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I respectfully disagree with tube type tires on wheels intended for tubeless tires but I only say that for peace of mind. Last thing I want is four flat assemblies due to poor sealing between the rim flange and tire bead during air inflation process.

In fact I would only run them on splits. Just my two cents.
 

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