Buying a BJ60 in B.C.

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by waldrtw, Jun 11, 2004.

  1. waldrtw

    waldrtw

    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2003
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    How hard is it to get a BJ60 brought back into the US. I have seen tons of the them for sell near Vancouver. I live in Portland and it would be easy to run up there and get one. Is it that easy to do, or I am in for a world of paper work???


    Tim
     
  2. hj60

    hj60

    Messages:
    1,511
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2003
    Location:
    Ahwatukee, Phoenix, AZ, USA
    I think you've got to wait until it's 25 years old.
     
  3. cruiser_guy

    cruiser_guy

    Messages:
    11,197
    Likes Received:
    30
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2003
    Location:
    Wherever the truck stops!!
    I don't think there is a need to wait for 25 years. These are Canadian production vehicles NOT off shore production. The trouble is that you as an American MUST do the paperwork. The Canadian seller is NOT able to import it for you as they (me for instance) have no status in the U.S.
     
  4. HZJ60 Guy

    HZJ60 Guy Tank Buster

    Messages:
    2,356
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle area
    Here Mr. Portland. My HJ60 was already imported but I looked into it anyway.

    TB

    First off, am not a registered importer though I am thinking of becoming one.

    Any how, this is what I know:

    1.) CANADIAN SPEC'D VEHICLES.
    a.) DOT free 25 years old EPA free 21 years period, Canadian or rest-of-world. Some customs officers go by exact prod. date so beware, if you are early by a day you, may have to wait, each officer/crossing is different.
    b.) What is required to cross the border for newer than 25/21 year old Canadian spec'd vehicle is one of two things and ONLY one of these two things, period, case closed. EITHER a letter from the manufacturer stating that your vehicle, identified in the letter by the proper VIN, meets all US safety and emissions standards for its model year, OR paperwork done by a registered importer/independent commercial importer. As per my phone conversations with Jim Press' personal assistant, it is Toyota company policy to NOT issue letters of conformity, so don't even start there like the NHTSA tells you to on their website, it is futile, you will never receive a good letter.
    c.) There is a list of Canadian spec'd vehicles that the EPA knows to meet US emissions standards, this list is available to the public and it is the list that importers use to make sure your vehicle meets emissions. One importer I called said my BJ70 wasn't on the list, one I called said it was, don't know why the difference. If your vehicle does not show up on this list you have a few options. The following options are the same for rest-of-world imports as well. You have to pay to have your vehicle emissions tested. If it is older than 6 years only a "MOD" test is required, if it doesn't pass the first time modifications are made and the vehicle must be retested. If it is newer than 6 years it must be tested, a certificate of conformity filed, and a 1% fee paid to the EPA, same goes for if it fails the first test and/or if modifications are required. A total of three vehicles of the same model and model year may enter under the one certificate of conformity, after that every third must be tested. From my research all Canadian spec'd diesel Cruisers meet US emissions. Eugene Cole got a letter from Toyota that stated that his '85 BJ70 met all safety except minor labeling but it did not meet emissions. This was a lie, manufacturers will lie to keep non-US vehicles from coming in. I obtained Toyota documents filed with Transport Canada that stated that the BJ70 met Canadian emissions because it was manufactured for US emissions (which at the time were more strict than Canadian). My contact with the EPA in Ann Arbor told me he has caught many manufacturers lying to importers about compliance, it is not unusual. My contact with Transport Canada forwarded this document on to My contact at the EPA in Ann Arbor who then sent to the proper EPA guy in DC.
    d.) As exemplified by the above mentioned Toyota letter that stated that a Canadian spec'd BJ70 met US safety with the exception of minor labeling, all Canadian spec'd Cruisers meet US safety. The ONLY modification required is that a label that says KM must be affixed to the face plate of the speedo unit next to the odometer reading and next to the tripodometer reading, this was told to me over the phone by the NHTSA themselves. One of my importers did this, the other did not, doesn't bother me that the one did not, saved me $100.
    e.) The key therefore to legally importing a Canadian spec'd Cruiser is finding an importer who will do it for you that knows enough about what they are doing to know it meets emissions, to know that the entire speedo unit does NOT need to be swapped out ONLY a sticker put on it, etc. Best thing to do, call around beginning with the RI/ICI that is closest to your home or border crossing and work from there.
    f.) EPA/DOT exemptions for importing Canadian spec'd vehicles are as follows: A Canadian may gift/will/or sell their personal vehicle to an immediate family member that lives in the US. Proof of relation must be provided. A Canadian moving to the US (either to permanently emigrate or just on a visa longer than one year say for a student attending a 4 year college) may import with them one personal vehicle. For either of these exemptions you must prove that you did not purchase the vehicle for the sole purpose of bringing into the US often by showing ownership for at least one year prior to importation.

    2.) NON CANADIAN SPEC'D VEHICLES IN CANADA.
    a.) A vehicle not manufactured for the Canadian or US market may ONLY be imported into Canada if it is 15 years old or older. There is no requirement to make these 15 year old or older vehicles meet Canadian specs.
    b.) This 15 year rule has a "hard cut off date" after which it doesn't matter if it is 15 years old or not. If it was manufactured for a market other than US or Canada after January 1, 1990 it cannot be imported period. However, it looks like there will be a new law passed in Canada before this hard cut off date goes into effect with a sunsetting exemption. Starting in 2005 only 15 year old and older may be imported, 2006 14 year old and older may be imported, 2007 13 year old an older maybe imported, and so on until the year 2020 when all vehicles will be made to comply with one world standard. In any case, the man claiming to be importing Japanese Cruisers into Canada that are newer than 15 years old is either doing it illegally or they are being imported into Canada for re-export only, so BEWARE!
    c.) Non Canadian spec'd Cruisers in Canada are NOT eligible for importation into the US under the same rules that govern Canadian spec'd imports, they must be imported into the US as if they were coming from rest-of-world, see #3 below.
    d.) Mining Cruisers fall into this category too since they were never certified for Canadian roads. Even when they have been legally licensed by persons for on-road use in Canada, they must be imported as if they were being imported from rest-of-world.
    e.) The same exemptions listed in #1F above apply to non Canadian spec'd vehicles licensed for road use in Canada for importation into the US.

    3.) REST-OF-WORLD IMPORTATION.
    a.) DOT. In order for a Cruiser to be imported into the US that was not originally manufactured for the US or Canadian market it must be imported by an RI/ICI and it must be on the list of vehicles eligible for importation. Vehicles make it onto this list one of three ways. First of all the administrator of the NHTSA may deem a vehicle eligible for importation. Second, an RI/ICI may petition a vehicle's eligibility claiming a substantially similar US spec'd model exists. Lastly, an RI/ICI may petition a vehicle's eligibility claiming while no substantially similar US spec'd model exists the vehicle is capable of being modified to meet US safety standards. This last option sometimes involves crash testing three vehicles to prove crashworthiness. Currently, the only Cruisers on the eligibility list are through model 1996. These petitions for eligibility for Cruisers are NOT model specific, they only state Land Cruiser MPV. MPV stands for multi-purpose vehicle and is the designation all SUVs and minivans get. This designation is visible on the manufacturer's tag on the driver side door sill. My BJ70s have all had this MPV designation. Any 60, 80, 70 series short, medium, or long wagon, or 40 series short or long wagon would be eligible for importation under the existing petitions, no pickups. From going through non-US/Canadian spec'd Cruisers I have found very little to not be in compliance with US safety standards. This is because Toyota uses DOT spec'd parts on their lines whether the vehicle is going to the US or not. Things like seat belt supports, safety glass, DOT brake lines, etc. are all already up to snuff. The only things I have found different are minor, like the speedos, high mount rear brake lights, side marker lights, license plate lights, locking glove boxes, etc., all things that can be easily and affordably modified. The only big expensive things are on 9/1/97 and newer manufactured SUVs, there needs to be dual airbags and side safety impact beams.
    b.) EPA. Please see #1C.
    c.) Other EPA possibilities. From working with my contact at the EPA who was in charge of working with the ICIs who were filing certificates of conformity, there appears to be some other ways to go about emissions. He told me that if I could show that the emissions standards for the country the Cruiser was originally manufactured/certified for were equal to or more strict than the US standards, then testing could be avoided. He also told me that if we could obtain government or manufacturer emissions output information for the Cruiser, such as the emissions certificate of conformity on file in the country of origin, which shows the vehicle's emissions to be within US limits then testing could again be avoided. He also told me he felt that the whole test-every-third might be circumvented if manufacturer proof were provided that no running changes were made to that model during that model year that would affect emissions. On that same token he felt the same argument could be made for same models of different years, again that if manufacturer proof were provided that no running changes were made to that model between model years then testing could be avoided. While he felt these were all possibilities no one has ever attempted to circumvent the testing process by using any of these ideas.
    d.) Right hand drive. There was a time when the DOT didn't care, but just recently they ruled that from now on there must be a petition for import eligibility on file for a RHD model. Currently there is only one RHD petition on file and that is for the Nissan GTS/GTR. Rick, I know you say those importers all told you that they would have to convert a RHD Cruiser to LHD. The truth is they told you that because they did not want to go through the hassle of petitioning a RHD model and importing your truck. Since there is at least one petition on file for a RHD vehicle we all know now that the argument CAN be successfully made that a RHD model is as safe as a LHD of the same model. The trick is finding an importer who is willing to petition a RHD Cruiser.
    e.) More exemptions. The NHTSA lists on their website import exemptions that go for the EPA as well, such as for show purposes, research, diplomatic service, etc. But for the most part those are temporary exemptions, the vehicles must be shown to leave the country within one year. If you are looking to have a trailer queen trail truck or if you live on a ranch there is another exemption. Vehicles may be imported for off-road use only and be exempt from DOT/EPA. The vehicle can be imported but it CAN'T be licensed/registered for road use, so no plates! This exemption however has its limits. For example, off road diesel vehicles manufactured after 1/1/96 with an HP of 50 to 100 must meet emissions standards and off road diesel vehicles manufactured after 1/1/97 with an HP of 101 to 175 must meet emissions standards. Lastly, there is another option. A vehicle can imported as parts, reassembled, and titled in some states as a home built vehicle form used parts. This loop hole was recently closed down in my state, but in many others this is a real possibility. The requirements for doing this are different in each state, so call your local DMV and ask.
     
  5. VTCruiser

    VTCruiser

    Messages:
    3,459
    Likes Received:
    18
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    Its possible, imported my HJ60 last December. some paper work? yes, but it wasn't bad and well worth it. Depsite the extra costs, i would recommend using and RI.
     
  6. HZJ60 Guy

    HZJ60 Guy Tank Buster

    Messages:
    2,356
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle area
    There you have it.



    TB
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.