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brakes

Discussion in '60-Series Wagons' started by hammer1, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. hammer1

    hammer1

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    the time has come to do my front brakes on my 60.
    i consider myself a "reluctant" but capable machanic.
    ive replaced the spring, ps pump ( more than once!) alt. starter, carb, and various other general maint. type stuff.
    is a brake job out of the realm of a guy like me?
    i'm going to buy new pads, and new rotors, rather than see if i can turn the rotors, since time is a premium for me.
    am i going to get stuck in a hole?
    i've got the hanes manual, which seems to go into great detail about brakes.
    hammer
     
  2. NocalFJ60

    NocalFJ60

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    I did my brakes along with the axle all at once. Just take your time and look at things while you take them apart. If you replace the rotors you have to hammer out the wheel studs. It is also a good time to replace the wheel bearings if you are doing rotors.I think brakes are not too hard just make sure you bleed the lines good after you finsh.

    Goodluck
     
  3. StanCruiserMan

    StanCruiserMan

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    A brass drift and a 3 lb hammer (otherwise known as BFH) will make short work of removing the wheel studs without damaging them. If you do the bearings too these will work well on the bearing races as well. Get the factory service manual if you don’t have it. It will give you confidence and let you know what you are in for before you start. Hanes is poor IMO.
    FSM:
    10/84 or newer = Pub. No. 36262E
    Older = Pub. No. 36044E
     
  4. Tinker

    Tinker

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    Brakes are simple & easy. Big C-clamp on old pads compresses the pistons easily, but be careful about overflowing the master cylinder reservoir. Turkey baster works to get excess out (but don't put it back in the kitchen drawer after using it).

    Buy or borrow a set of metric flare wrenches.

    A glass quart jar with metal cap works best for the catch container when bleeding. Get 2-3' of clear plastic tubing that just fits over the bleeder screw. Drill a smaller hole in the metal cap & enlarge it with a tapered punch so the tubing has to be forced through it. Put the excess fluid from the master cylinder in the jar, & make sure the end of the tube is at the bottom, below the level of the fluid in the jar when bleeding. Clear tube makes it easy to see air bubbles as you open the bleeder screw.

    Black brake fluid indicates deteriorating seals, either in the MC, wheel cylinders, or both. Brake fluid is cheap in quantity, & flushing the system until you see clear fluid at each wheel is a good idea.

    Calipers & wheel cylinders aren't too hard to rebuild if the pistons aren't corroded.

    If you don't know if or when the flex lines were changed, do it now. Better to know you're safe.

    Brembo makes good aftermarket rotors that are pretty cheap.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2005
  5. SAS

    SAS Seeking higher vistas

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    Or if you don't want to fab yourself a mason jar bleeding kit, most parts stores sell a kit (less than $10) with a pint-sized plastic jar with clear tubing, and a plastic nozzles that you poke into the bleed valve. It's held by friction, so you'd think it might "pop" out when you apply the brakes, but I've had one for years and have never spilled a drop (knock on wood).

    Brakes are easy once you've done them a time or two. I pull mine after every outing where I get into mud and water crossings. They collect alot of crud, and keeping them clean goes a long way.
     
  6. lovetoski

    lovetoski SILVER Star

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    Remember to get a couple of cans of brake cleaner. I've never been able to re-assemble w/out getting grease/dirt onto the caliper - but brake cleaner takes it right off.
     
  7. archie

    archie

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    If you disconnect some of the brake lines often enough or find the lines hard (rusted frozen) to disconnect, try getting a 10mm or 12mm LINE wrench. You'll get a better grip instead of slipping and rounding off the nuts.
    PB blaster the lines and caliper bolts a day or two before start the project.
     
  8. archie

    archie

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    Oh yeah, be prepared to run off to the auto store to get brake lines because mine leaked after the weaked line ruptured (due to age and abrasion to a bracket). All that pounding stresses out the weak points and midwest rust doesn't help much either.