brakes, rotors, calipers and wheel bearings?

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tejas
legends. i'm going on for the first time to do brakes soon. brake light is on and i've never taken a look in there.
can i upgrade the calipers or the rotors? is one or the other a better bang for your buck? would doing both be a good place to spend some money?
can i just measure the existing rotors (225K) and resurface them if they have grooves?
do i go with ceramic pads?
on the front or the rear i can upgrade to 100 series pads is that right?
anyone have any links or recommendations?
so far i have:

pads
DP6993 front $63x2 (amazon)
DP71319 7000 series. rear
$132x2 (ebay)

rotors
DBS +3. front
$209x2. (slee)
DBA +3. rear
$182x2 (slee)

calipers
no info

THANKS

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cartercd

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Chandler, AZ
Warning light is likely low fluid level. There is a float sensor on your master cylinder reservoir. Of course, you need to inspect the entire system. At that age and mileage, you should strongly consider replacing all your soft brake lines.
 
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Warning light is likely low fluid level. There is a float sensor on your master cylinder reservoir. Of course, you need to inspect the entire system. At that age and mileage, you should strongly consider replacing all your soft brake lines.
yeah. thanks for that. i totally hate bleeding brake lines so i might actually pay someone else to do this. i also need to finally settle on whether i need or should get extended brake lines for a 2-3" lift. i think it is 2" but i realize i need to verify this i think.
 

WarDamnEagle

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yeah. thanks for that. i totally hate bleeding brake lines so i might actually pay someone else to do this. i also need to finally settle on whether i need or should get extended brake lines for a 2-3" lift. i think it is 2" but i realize i need to verify this i think.
You actually don't have to disconnect the brake lines to change pads and rotors. Probably a good idea to flush and change the brake fluid anyway if it hasn't been done in the last 2 or more years but that can also be done without having to actually "bleed" any air out of the lines. Of course if you change the soft lines, as someone suggested, then you will obviously have to bleed them.
 
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Yeah, I went ahead and did all the bearings while in there.
54 mm special socket and paper towels and gloves? do you need a driver if some kind or some propane to heat up a housing? i will look in the FSM but just trying to get a practical idea...
 
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FWIW, the OEM bearings are cheaper if you don't buy them from Toyota; this, and seals, are the exceptions to the rule. Anywhere you can buy NSK or Timken bearings, you can get both front and rear bearings, including online bearings distributors, just make sure they're NSK or Timken, unless you know enough about bearings to make the substitution yourself. NOTE: any time you open the hub, you will need at least one new seal - you cannot get around this; the rear needs the seal and gasket.

Pro Tip: replace your snap rings and cone washers, at least once, when YOU remove them. They are springs, springs weaken over time and you have no idea when they were installed or what they have been subjected to at the hands of savage "I can fix anything" mechanics.

You should at least clean and repack the bearings if you if don't know when it was last done. You can do this without any special tools, unless you consider a torque wrench a special tool, and then, well...

I've been using ceramic pads for years and would not go back. Slotted and drilled rotors are another subject. They look good, but I can argue they offer no advantage over OEM disks, on a Land Cruiser. You'll get all kinds of opinions on this topic.

Replacing 80 series disks, calipers and pads with 100 series is another voodoo topic, IMHO. The 100 series has better brakes because it has a better brake system, not because it has bigger pads. I have both, I know. Having said that, there is a great amount of variability in 80 series brake systems. My 80 has brake power equal to my LX470. The other two 80s the minions drive have brakes that range, IMO, from OK to poor. I have yet to find the root cause; not for lack of trying.

I second the comments about replacing flexible lines and replacing the fluid. Buy a Motive power bleeder and the 80 master cylinder adapter; you will recoup the money you spend after one brake job, and you will not hate bleeding brakes any more than any other job on your truck. If you decide to replace the lines, get a new LSBPV too. Yours is rusted inside.

HTH
 
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DO NOT use a torch on the hubs to remove the bearing cups. There is a 0.002"-0.004" press fit on them, depending on whether it's the inner or outer. There are slots in the hub to allow a BRASS drift pin to be used to drive them out. You can install the new ones like this, or use a press. My 12-ton just did manage to push in the rear inner cup, and the cup sat in the freezer for two days; I measured 0.0045" press though.

To repeat, you do not have to remove the cups to clean and repack the cones. Only if the cones are sloppy in the cups or look scored should you replace them. Timken's recommendation for these bearings is a very light duty in a Land Cruiser, so they really will last a long time, unless they are run dry. I can supply the Timken engineering data if you're interested.
 
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54 mm special socket and paper towels and gloves? do you need a driver if some kind or some propane to heat up a housing? i will look in the FSM but just trying to get a practical idea...
Socket and a bunch of paper towels and gloves. Brass drift to help remove the cone washers.
 

FMC80

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I just went through this. If you haven’t been in your brakes recently or ever in your case, I’d take some time to remove your calipers and inspect them throughly. You are probably in need of a rebuild. Inspect your pads, rotors and all clips/anti squeal/shims/etc etc. you likely need all new clips and such. Take an inventory of parts needing replacement and go from there.

I got new pads, checked out my rotors. They needed to be turned, I didn’t want to eff with the local shops here handling my brake components so I ordered new OEM rotors. Why? Because they’re perfectly adequate for the 80 and my driving style. I drive aggressively but in moderation.

Here’s my take on pads:
100 series pads are great! For 100 series cruisers and brakes. Is that much more pad material going to make a damn bit of difference on an 80? Probably not. The feedback you read on the forum are probably subjective validation.

I like Toyota pads and get the shim kit since it’s all inclusive.

I bought new OEM calipers too for all 4 corners. Why? Because when I went to do my pads and rotors, I noticed several of the boots that house my caliper pistons were shot, torn, ripped and probably allowing a bunch of crap to infiltrate.

Did all new brake lines separately because I’m dumb.

Bled till I was blue in the face but got her done.

Just the other day while on the freeway, an idiot saw a plastic plant pot rolling on the road and instead of plowing through it OR pulling off to the very wide median, she decided to stop in the middle of the freeway. Well that caused a chain reaction. I smashed my brakes and I came to a solid halt and felt very confident of my braking system. I had enough following distance between the car in front of me but it was very reassuring to be able to stop so well.
 
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FWIW, you can't beat Toyota OEM pads, for price, availability and performance. I used to rebuild calipers on my 40s and 60s, but I gave up on the 80s (can't remember why). Rumor has it the rebuilt NAPA calipers come from the same factory as the Toyota rebuilt calipers. I've installed both and can't tell the difference.

Rebuilt its more costly than rebuilding, but it sure is less hassle. And if your piston bores are rusted, like all mine were, I'm not sure you could rebuild them; I couldn't and I pretty much have a machine shop in my garage.
 

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