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Body Panel Glue

Discussion in '40- & 55-Series Tech' started by residualboulders, Feb 9, 2004.

  1. residualboulders

    residualboulders

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    I recently had new quarter panels put on. The Auto body shop used some kind of fancy body panel glue that supposedly is better to use than a weld where possible because it give a constant contact to the sheet metal, thus reducing the possibility of small pockets at the joint where water can accumulate and cause rust.
    Looks like it works great, the panels are very solid. I'm just curious if you can buy it in a small tube of some kind. The body shop showed me the tool they use to apply the glue and told me where to buy it. They even told me I could borrow the application tool over the weekend to fix a couple of small holes in the floor. I just don't like borrowing stuff, especially from guys I don't know too well.
    I just have a couple of small holes I want to cover until I can afford to get new replacement panels. Anyone know where to get this glue stuff, or what it is called? I'd prefer to use it for a couple of reasons, 1- I'd have to drive to WY to borrow my dad's welder to weld it, 2- the hole is just above the gas tank, and I'm a whooss, and don't feel like welding by the gas tank... Grinding the sheet metal down right there will be bad enough.
     
  2. amandap

    amandap

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    www.eastwood.com carries the adhesive in a tube that fits in a regular caulk gun. I think it's around $18-$20 for just the adhesive. They also have a kit with all the other stuff that most folks already have around. A flanging/punch air tool is a good help. The inexpensive ones from Harbor Freight seem to work fine if you're not depending on them to make a living. :cheers:
     
  3. toddslater

    toddslater

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    residual,
    The abonination I work for makes this over in europe..merc , bmw and the like use it..I hadn't heard it was available to autobody suppliers...but it was only a matter of time. It is not seam sealer...although you would use seam sealer to final dress the joint. My 02. is take the guys at the shop up on their offer and bring them a case of beer. Do some bonding with all of the above...it is rare (at least hereabouts) that a shop would be so accomodating. Call ahead to see what the beer of choice is and show up on friday afternoon. :beer:
     
  4. Poser

    Poser Oh...Durka Durka Durka. s-Moderator Supporting Vendor

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    todd is right on with this one...

    When you find a place that will offer things up like that, take them up on it, I have been fortunate to have a place like that around me, and you would be suprised what gets done for a case of beer.

    Good luck!

    -Steve
     
  5. residualboulders

    residualboulders

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    thanks fellas. Just need a free weekend to do it, I'll have to take up the guy on his offer.I figured I'd try and find it elsewhere so I could do it here and there... but on the other hand. If thats the case it probably won't get done for a while. So I should just do it all in one day.
     
  6. boltonski

    boltonski

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    Ok, this is an extremely old thread that I'm bringing back, but rather than starting a new one...

    I've uncovered a couple of holes in my '77 after scraping through the black goo used on the driver's side floor boards. Total of about 4, all roughly the diameter of a quarter to a silver dollar. One is above the body support beam that runs under the driver's feet.

    I took a trip to my (well-trusted) local bodyshop to review what it would take to repair, with he caveat that this is a daily driver, not a show car, and will probably be getting some bedliner treatment in the near future. The owner suggested that, rather than welding in new sheet metal, he'd grind out all the rust well, paint on some rust converter (rust bullit? POR?), fabricate some patches from 18ga steel and glue on with door skin adhesive.

    The goal is a structurally sound means of preventing future rust, road grime from entering, that is not ugly. My questions:

    1. Will this work as a decent fix (that is, not continue to rust).
    2. Will there be a problem at the hole over the body-support beam?
    3. Is there a better way, either using different products, or is this foolish and should I be welding in steel?

    Thanks, y'all,

    Dan
     
  7. cjgoode

    cjgoode

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    I am a little confused if you grind it down and cut a patch out of steel why you would not just weld it in. I could see using it to put an aluminum patch in. Seems like if you take the time to cut and grind it, then might was well fix it right the first time.
     
  8. 40hazjo

    40hazjo

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    There is a at home use stuff called POR PATCH it is made by POR15. It is the best stuff i have came up with to use for small holes a the lovely rain gutter problem.

    Good luck on your patching....

    Joe
     
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